index Animal Rights

Regan's The Case for Animal Rights (1983) is regarded by many scholars and commentators as the seminal work in the field. He argues that animals have moral rights of the sort enjoyed by humans, especially the right to life. In his view, support for the rights of animals is no different than support for human rights. This work begins with core concepts of inherent value theory, the same concepts that have been significant in the progress of human civil liberties since the seventeenth century and which were extended somewhat to nonhumans during the nineteenth century. The notion of inherent value continues to be vital and important for progress in both human and animal rights. The development of these views and their presentation in scholarly and activist forums have brought Regan to the forefront as the "philosophical father" of the animal rights movement and as a major figure in the rise of a socially and economically significant phenomenon.

Animal and Regan image Tom and Horses Regan on tv The Case for Animal Rights The Norman Rockwell Radical Animal Research

 

"All of us engaged in the struggle for animal rights have a tendency to forget who we once were. Most of us once ate meat, for example, or unblinkingly dissected nonhuman animals in the lab during high school or college biology courses. Probably we went to a zoo or an aquarium and had a good time. Some of us hunted or fished and enjoyed that, too. The plain fact is, it is not just society that needs changing. The struggle for animal rights is also a struggle with self. What we are trying to do is transform the moral zombie society would like us to be into the morally advanced being we are capable of becoming. All liberation movements have this common theme. That's only one of the ways our Movement resembles other rights movements of the past."

óTom Regan, The Bird in the Cage: A Glimpse of My LifeóAn Autobiography

Regan speaking at World Day Letter from Peter Singer to Tom Regan Letter to Peter Singer from Tom Regan Tom and dog Article titled "The Moral Basis of Vegetarianism" from the "Canadian Journal of Philosophy" "Defending Animal Rights"

 

Tom Regan and Peter Singer are the major philosophers who write about animal welfare. Singer, who wrote a review of Regan's book The Case for Animal Rights for the New York Review of Books, is now a professor at Princeton University. They co-edited Animal Rights and Human Obligations, Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1975.

 

Comments on The Case for Animal Rights

"The Case for Animal Rights is a pioneering work. It is the first comprehensive and systematic exploration of the issues, the first effort to define a position that faces and answers every serious objection to the idea of animal rights, the first philosophical discussion designed to invite a thoughtful response from the general reader, and the first treatment suitable for continuing use in public policy debates. . . . Destined to become a classic."

"An important book, which states the case for the long overlooked justice toward animals, admirably. It is a book that should be widely read."

"Reganís The Case for Animal Rights is a superb example of theoretical and applied ethics at its best. Not only does it present the case of human and animal rights in a clear, rigorous and well-reasoned philosophical manner; it also is a brilliant critique of major theories: rational egoism, utilitarianism, contractarianism, Kantianism, and Aristotelianism."

"The most powerful and plausible consideration of the issues and defense of animal rights yet produced (or likely to be)."

 

An American Philosopher The Career of Tom Regan

Regan earned a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities from 1980 to 1981 to work on The Case For Animal Rights, which was completed in November 1981. Regan is known throughout the world as an animal rights activist. The Case for Animal Rights has been translated into German, Swedish, Danish, and Italian. Regan also authored Animal Rights and Human Obligations,edited by Tom Regan and Peter Singer, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1976. Tom Regan and Peter Singer are the major philosophers who write about animal welfare. Singer, who wrote a review of Reganís book The Case for Animal Rights for the New York Review of Books, is now a professor at Princeton University. They co-edited Animal Rights and Human Obligations, Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1975. Reganís first published essay on animal rights was "The Moral Basis of Vegetarianism," Canadian Journal of Philosophy, October 1975. A few more of his books are: The Thee Generation, Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1991; Matters of Life and Death, Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1980; and And Justice for All, N.J.: Rowman and Littlefield, 1982. Regan spoke at the World Day for Laboratory Animals in April 1984. Regan has also produced several documentaries on animal rights. His film, Voices I Have Heard, won the Gold Award at the Houston International Film Festival. Regan's film We Are All Noah won the Silver Medal at the International Film & TV Festival of New York in 1986. Regan was honored with the Mahatma Gandhi Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Animal Rights Movement in 1986. He also won the N.C. People Newsmaker award.
 
Introduction Family Life and Education Writing and Research Animal Rights Teaching Culture and Animals Foundation
Introduction Family Life and Education Writing and Research Animal Rights Teaching Culture and Animals Foundation
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