North Carolina Extension and Community Association Records 1916-2011

Summary
Contents
Names/subjects
Using these materials
Creator
North Carolina Extension and Community Association
Size
84.25 linear feet (75 boxes, 4 legal boxes, 1 oversize legal box, 7 oversize flat boxes, 11 flat boxes, 3 oversize boxes, 3 half boxes, 1 album, 14 cartons)
Call number
UA 102.052
Access to materials

Portions of this collection have restricted access; access requires at least 48 hours advance notice.

The records of the North Carolina Extension and Community Association document the activities of the association from 1916 to 2011, with the bulk of the records falling between 1929 and 1975. The files contain correspondence and memoranda, programs and brochures, reports, meeting minutes and agenda, member lists, financial information, clippings, news releases, photographs, and handbooks and yearbooks.

The association was organized in 1920 as the Federation of Home Bureaus, and the name changed to the Federation of Home Demonstration Clubs in 1924. An African-American organization was formed in 1940, and it integrated with its white counterpart in 1966. The current designation was assumed in 1995.

Biographical/historical note

The first women's home demonstration clubs were formed in North Carolina in 1913, in the fourteen counties that employed home demonstration agents. As the number of clubs and counties involved grew steadily thereafter, it was decided that a statewide organization was needed to coordinate agents activities and to act as a voice for their concerns. Thus, at the 1920 Farm Women's Convention in Raleigh (held in connection with the annual Farmer's Convention which began in 1903), the Federation of Home Bureaus was created and charged with directing the efforts of the home demonstration agents. In 1924 the name of the organization changed to the North Carolina Federation of Home Demonstration Clubs.

The Federation held its first separate business meeting in 1928, called the State Council meeting. During this period the local clubs were organized into sixteen districts that held their own meetings beginning in 1929. The number of districts grew to 27 by the 1950s, and the numerical districts were abolished in the following decade. In 1958, the group's name was changed to the North Carolina Organization of Home Demonstration Clubs.

Negro home demonstration work was organized in 1917, and the first clubs formed by 1922. A statewide organization was not created, however, until 1940, as the State Federation of Negro Home Demonstration Clubs. By 1945, the name had changed to the State Council of Negro Home Demonstration Clubs of North Carolina.

The two organizations were integrated in 1966, and the group's name changed to the North Carolina Extension Homemakers Association. This name remained until the current designation was assumed by 1995. In 2005 the Extension and Community Association (NCECA) had over 5359 members in 434 Clubs.

Scope/content

The records in the North Carolina Extension and Community Association collection document the activities of the association from 1916 to 2011, with the bulk of the records falling between 1929 to 1975. Detailed scope and content notes can be found at the beginning of each of the separate series below, as well as for each subseries. The only apparent gaps in the records pertain to the earliest dates of North Carolina home demonstration work, the 1910s and early 1920s. This collection was formerly titled North Carolina Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences Records, but it was determined in 2006 that the records did not originate with that organization but rather with the North Carolina Extension and Community Association.

The records in this collection tie in closely with the records in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, UA 102.018. Many of the records in the Department's collection can be found to a greater or lesser degree here as well. Researchers who search through this collection are advised to see the records of UA 102.018 as well.

Arrangement

The collection has been organized into ten series: Annual Records, Administrative Records, Affiliations, Committees, County and District Records, Farm and Home Week, Financial Records, Oversize, Scrapbooks, and Unprocessed. Most of the records have been arranged alphabetically within each series, with the exception of the Annual Records, Farm and Home Week, and Oversize series, which are arranged chronologically. In addition, many of the series have been further divided into subseries where appropriate, often denoting records of particular interest. Occasionally, the records in different series overlap, in order to preserve the original filing of the records. This can be seen in the number of financial records to be found in the Annual and Administrative series, in addition to the files in the Financial Records series.

Use of these materials

The nature of the NCSU Libraries' Special Collections means that copyright or other information about restrictions may be difficult or even impossible to determine despite reasonable efforts. The NCSU Libraries claims only physical ownership of most Special Collections materials.

The materials from our collections are made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user must assume full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used for academic research or otherwise should be fully credited with the source.

This collection may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations. Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which North Carolina State University assumes no responsibility.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], North Carolina Extension and Community Association Records, UA 102.052, Special Collections Research Center, North Carolina State University Libraries, Raleigh, NC

Related material

Source of acquisition

Transferred from offices of North Carolina Extension and Community Association.

Sponsor

Portions of this collection have been digitized as part of "Content, Context, and Capacity: A Collaborative Large-Scale Digitization Project on the Long Civil Rights Movement in North Carolina." The project was made possible by funding from the federal Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA), as administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources.

Access to the collection

Portions of this collection have restricted access; access requires at least 48 hours advance notice.

For more information contact us via mail, phone, or our web form.

Mailing address:
Special Collections Research Center
Box 7111
Raleigh, NC, 27695-7111

Phone: (919) 515-2273

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], North Carolina Extension and Community Association Records, UA 102.052, Special Collections Research Center, North Carolina State University Libraries, Raleigh, NC

Use of these materials

The nature of the NCSU Libraries' Special Collections means that copyright or other information about restrictions may be difficult or even impossible to determine despite reasonable efforts. The NCSU Libraries claims only physical ownership of most Special Collections materials.

The materials from our collections are made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user must assume full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used for academic research or otherwise should be fully credited with the source.

This collection may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations. Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which North Carolina State University assumes no responsibility.