Phil Freelon Papers 1975-2018

Summary
Contents
Names/subjects
Using these materials
Creator
Freelon, Phil
Size
173.77 linear feet (158 archival boxes, 4 legal boxes, 1 legal halfbox, 11 flat boxes, 2 card box, 85 flat folders, 242 tubes, and 5 architectural models.)
Call number
MC 00553
Access to materials

Collection is open for research; access requires at least 48 hours advance notice.

The Phil Freelon Papers consists of architectural drawings, extensive project files, and related architectural records. The projects documented include: Hillside High School; Diamond View Office Building; Durham Bulls Athletic Park; Durham Police Department; Durham Solid Waste Facility; Hope Valley Elementary;and The Hill Center in Durham, N.C.; and Lake Johnson Boat House and the North Carolina Old Revenue Building in Raleigh, N.C. Also included in the collection are some items from Freelon's personal archive documenting his career in architecture. Most of the records in the collection relate to Freelon's earlier projects in his career (during the 1990s). The collection also contains five architectural models and selected photographs of Freelon's work.

Phil Freelon (1952- ) is a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and founder and president of The Freelon Group, Inc., located in Durham, North Carolina. Freelon is a 1975 graduate of North Carolina State University's College of Design with a Bachelor of Environmental Design in Architecture; he received a Master of Architecture from MIT. In 1989, he spent a year of independent study at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design on a Loeb Fellowship. He served as adjunct faculty at North Carolina State University’s College of Design and was a visiting critic and lecturer at several universities including Harvard and MIT. Freelon was named Designer of the Year for 2008 in Contract Magazine, won first prize in the PPG Furniture Design Competition, was the 2009 recipient of the AIA Thomas Jefferson Award for public architecture, and 2010 recipient of AIA North Carolina’s Gold Medal. He is a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, won the 2012 Design Guild Award, and the same year was appointed to the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts by President Obama. Freelon specializes in public architecture and is best known for his design of cultural museums and educational buildings in Washington, D.C.; Baltimore, Maryland; Chicago, Illinois; San Francisco, California; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Atlanta and Augusta, Georgia; and Durham, Greensboro and Charlotte, North Carolina.

Biographical/historical note

Phil Freelon (1952- ) is a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and founder and president of The Freelon Group, Inc., located in Durham, North Carolina. Freelon is a 1975 graduate of North Carolina State University's College of Design with a Bachelor of Environmental Design in Architecture; he received a Master of Architecture from MIT. In 1989, he spent a year of independent study at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design on a Loeb Fellowship. He served as adjunct faculty at North Carolina State University’s College of Design and was a visiting critic and lecturer at several universities including Harvard and MIT. Freelon was named Designer of the Year for 2008 in Contract Magazine, won first prize in the PPG Furniture Design Competition, was the 2009 recipient of the AIA Thomas Jefferson Award for public architecture, and 2010 recipient of AIA North Carolina’s Gold Medal. He is a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, won the 2012 Design Guild Award, and the same year was appointed to the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts by President Obama. Freelon specializes in public architecture and is best known for his design of cultural museums and educational buildings in Washington, D.C.; Baltimore, Maryland; Chicago, Illinois; San Francisco, California; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Atlanta and Augusta, Georgia; and Durham, Greensboro and Charlotte, North Carolina.

Scope/content

The Phil Freelon Papers consists of architectural drawings, extensive project files, and related architectural records. The projects documented include: Hillside High School; Diamond View Office Building; Durham Bulls Athletic Park; Durham Police Department; Durham Solid Waste Facility; Hope Valley Elementary;and The Hill Center in Durham, N.C.; and Lake Johnson Boat House and the North Carolina Old Revenue Building in Raleigh, N.C. Also included in the collection are some items from Freelon's personal archive documenting his career in architecture. Most of the records in the collection relate to Freelon's earlier projects in his career (during the 1990s). The collection also contains five architectural models and selected photographs of Freelon's work.

Arrangement

This collection is arranged into five series:

  • Project Files;
  • Professional Papers;
  • Drawings;
  • Architectural Models;
  • Photographs of Freelon Projects.

Use of these materials

The nature of the NCSU Libraries' Special Collections means that copyright or other information about restrictions may be difficult or even impossible to determine despite reasonable efforts. The NCSU Libraries claims only physical ownership of most Special Collections materials.

The materials from our collections are made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user must assume full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used for academic research or otherwise should be fully credited with the source.

This collection may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations. Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which North Carolina State University assumes no responsibility.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Phil Freelon Papers, MC 00553, Special Collections Research Center, North Carolina State University Libraries, Raleigh, NC

Related material

Source of acquisition

Gift of Phil Freelon, 2015 (Accessions 2015.0080 and 2015.0111)

Processing information

Processed by: Gwynn Thayer and Jessica Serrao, June 2015; machine-readable finding aid created by: Gwynn Thayer and Jessica Serrao, June 2015. Finding aid updated by Liz Bell because of additional processing.

Access to the collection

Collection is open for research; access requires at least 48 hours advance notice.

For more information contact us via mail, phone, or our web form.

Mailing address:
Special Collections Research Center
Box 7111
Raleigh, NC, 27695-7111

Phone: (919) 515-2273

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Phil Freelon Papers, MC 00553, Special Collections Research Center, North Carolina State University Libraries, Raleigh, NC

Use of these materials

The nature of the NCSU Libraries' Special Collections means that copyright or other information about restrictions may be difficult or even impossible to determine despite reasonable efforts. The NCSU Libraries claims only physical ownership of most Special Collections materials.

The materials from our collections are made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user must assume full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used for academic research or otherwise should be fully credited with the source.

This collection may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations. Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which North Carolina State University assumes no responsibility.