Computer Simulation Oral History Archive 2003-2016

Summary
Contents
Names/subjects
Using these materials
Size
1037208 megabytes; 0.25 linear feet (1 card box)
Call number
MC 00488
Access to materials

Collection is open for research; access requires at least 48 hours advance notice. Because of the nature of certain archival formats, including digital and audio-visual materials, access will require additional advanced notice. Copies of digital files will be provided for use in the SCRC Reading Room upon request.

We perform virus scans upon ingest and upon request for access. However, not all virus software profiles will catch all threats, especially newer, not yet recognized ones. The researcher assumes all risk when opening files.

While electronic files are made available to researchers, some files may not open with current software or at all. Researchers may be required to find and use legacy software packages to read files.

Some or all electronic files may be unavailable or restricted due to privacy reasons, agreement with the donor, or because files cannot be retrieved from original media.

The Computer Simulation Oral History Archive, 2003-2018, includes video and audio interviews of computer simulation pioneers. The video oral histories of computer simulation pioneers were funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and were conducted from 2013-2016. The purpose of this grant initiative was to capture and preserve accounts of seminal projects, related pivotal events, and distinguished project contributors from the perspectives of, and the words of, individuals who witnessed the relevant history of computer simulation firsthand. The importance of collecting these accounts is also based on the remarkable degree to which computer simulation has heavily influenced the design of computing software.

The Computer Simulation Oral History Archive is a part of the Computer Simulation Archive, which was established in 1998 with substantial initial donations of papers and research materials by three pioneers in the field of computer simulation—Robert G. Sargent, Alan Pritsker, and Julian Reitman. The Computer Simulation Oral History Archive includes interviews conducted from 2003-2016, almost all of which were funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation.

Computer simulation was established as a separate discipline of research and practice during the mid-1950s, with many seminal works in the field published from the mid-1950s to the early 1970s. Reflecting the diverse backgrounds of the field’s pioneers, simulation encompasses theory, methodology, and practice arising at the interface of applied probability, computer science, electrical and computer engineering, industrial and systems engineering, management, manufacturing engineering, operations research, and statistics.

The roots of the computer simulation field are revealed in the broad diversity of current application domains in which the development and use of large-scale computer simulation models are critical to the design, improvement, and operational control of computer and telecommunications networks, financial systems, healthcare delivery systems, transportation systems, and governmental and military systems. The field comprises discrete-event simulation, Monte Carlo methods, combined discrete-continuous simulation as well as hybrid analytic/simulation computer models. It is noteworthy that as the field has matured, it has contributed significantly to the evolution of allied disciplines—for example, object-oriented programming in computer science and innovative resampling schemes in statistics.

Biographical/historical note

The Computer Simulation Oral History Archive is a part of the Computer Simulation Archive, which was established in 1998 with substantial initial donations of papers and research materials by three pioneers in the field of computer simulation—Robert G. Sargent, Alan Pritsker, and Julian Reitman. The Computer Simulation Oral History Archive includes interviews conducted from 2003-2016, almost all of which were funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation.

Computer simulation was established as a separate discipline of research and practice during the mid-1950s, with many seminal works in the field published from the mid-1950s to the early 1970s. Reflecting the diverse backgrounds of the field’s pioneers, simulation encompasses theory, methodology, and practice arising at the interface of applied probability, computer science, electrical and computer engineering, industrial and systems engineering, management, manufacturing engineering, operations research, and statistics.

The roots of the computer simulation field are revealed in the broad diversity of current application domains in which the development and use of large-scale computer simulation models are critical to the design, improvement, and operational control of computer and telecommunications networks, financial systems, healthcare delivery systems, transportation systems, and governmental and military systems. The field comprises discrete-event simulation, Monte Carlo methods, combined discrete-continuous simulation as well as hybrid analytic/simulation computer models. It is noteworthy that as the field has matured, it has contributed significantly to the evolution of allied disciplines—for example, object-oriented programming in computer science and innovative resampling schemes in statistics.

Scope/content

The Computer Simulation Oral History Archive, 2003-2018, includes video and audio interviews of computer simulation pioneers. The video oral histories of computer simulation pioneers were funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and were conducted from 2013-2016. The purpose of this grant initiative was to capture and preserve accounts of seminal projects, related pivotal events, and distinguished project contributors from the perspectives of, and the words of, individuals who witnessed the relevant history of computer simulation firsthand. The importance of collecting these accounts is also based on the remarkable degree to which computer simulation has heavily influenced the design of computing software.

Arrangement

This collection is arranged alphabetically.

Use of these materials

The nature of the NCSU Libraries' Special Collections means that copyright or other information about restrictions may be difficult or even impossible to determine despite reasonable efforts. The NCSU Libraries claims only physical ownership of most Special Collections materials.

The materials from our collections are made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user must assume full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used for academic research or otherwise should be fully credited with the source.

This collection may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations. Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which North Carolina State University assumes no responsibility.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Computer Simulation Oral History Archive, MC 00488, Special Collections Research Center, North Carolina State University Libraries, Raleigh, NC

Source of acquisition

Accession numbers 2013.0172; 2013.0177; 2013.0178; 2013.0265; 2013.0288; 2013.0300; 2014.0092; 2014.0124, 2018.0169 each interview donated by the interviewee.

Processing information

Processed by: Gwynn Thayer, June 2014; machine-readable finding aid created by: Gwynn Thayer, June 2014; Digital materials processed by Jessica Rayman, 2016 March and April. Updated by Gwynn Thayer, April 2017; Finding aid updated by Taylor de Klerk, 2018 August.

Russell C. H. Cheng Oral History 2012 (2013.0172)
Russell C. H. Cheng Video Oral History 2013
Richard W. Conway Video Oral History 2014
Richard W. Conway and William L. Maxwell Video Oral History 2014
GPSS Video Oral History (Robert G. Sargent, Thomas J. Schriber, Julian Reitman, James O. Henriksen, Richard E. Nance) 2013 (2013.0265)
James O. Henriksen Video Oral History 2013 (2013.0265)
David W. Kelton Video Oral History 2014
Size: 9 files; 5.2 gigabytes
Philip J. Kiviat Video Oral History 2013 (2013.0265)
Jack P. C. Kleijnen Oral History 2013 (2013.0172)
Donald E. Knuth Video Oral History 2013 (2013.0178)
Averill M. Law Video Oral History 2013
Peter G. Lorenz Video Oral History 2014
Size: 5 files; 7 gigabytes
Harry M. Markowitz Video Oral History 2013 (2013.0178)
William L. Maxwell Video Oral History 2014
Richard E. Nance Video Oral History 2013 (2013.0177)
Ray J. Paul Video Oral History 2013
C. Dennis Pegden Video Oral History 2014
Size: 5 files; 4.7 gigabytes
Photographs from Winter Simulation 2013 Conference 2013 (2015.0021)
Size: 48 files; 52 megabytes
Mike Pidd Oral History 2012 (2013.0172)
Julian Reitman Video Oral History 2013 (2013.0265)
Robert G. Sargent Video Oral History 2013 (2013.0177)
Robert G. Sargent, James R. Wilson, and Richard E. Nance Video Oral History 2013 (2013.0177)
Bruce W. Schmeiser Video Oral History 2013
Thomas J. Schriber Video Oral History 2013 (2013.0265)
Lee W. Schruben Video Oral History 2013
Simula Discussion led by Richard E. Nance with Birger Møller-Pederson, Bjarne Stroustrup, and Ole Lehrmann Madsen 2016
Peter D. Welch Video Oral History 2013
Dean H. Wilson Oral History 2013
James R. Wilson Video Oral History 2013 (2013.0177)
Bernard P. Zeigler Video Oral History 2014
Paul F. Roth Oral History 2018 April 23 (2018.0169)
Size: 8 Files; 728 Megabytes; 1 Electronic file transfer (email/ETC)

Digital copy exists. Pending staff review and approval, access will be provided for use in the SCRC Reading Room upon request. Access may be restricted.

File count is approximate and may exclude system files, deleted files, and duplicates that may have been created during processing.


Simula Panel Oral History Transcription and Notes, Electronic File Transfer 2016 (2016.0247)
Size: 1 Electronic file transfer (email/ETC); 7 Files; 10 Megabytes

Digital copy exists. Pending staff review and approval, access will be provided for use in the SCRC Reading Room upon request. Access may be restricted.

File count is approximate and may exclude system files, deleted files, and duplicates that may have been created during processing.

Access to the collection

Collection is open for research; access requires at least 48 hours advance notice. Because of the nature of certain archival formats, including digital and audio-visual materials, access will require additional advanced notice. Copies of digital files will be provided for use in the SCRC Reading Room upon request.

We perform virus scans upon ingest and upon request for access. However, not all virus software profiles will catch all threats, especially newer, not yet recognized ones. The researcher assumes all risk when opening files.

While electronic files are made available to researchers, some files may not open with current software or at all. Researchers may be required to find and use legacy software packages to read files.

Some or all electronic files may be unavailable or restricted due to privacy reasons, agreement with the donor, or because files cannot be retrieved from original media.

For more information contact us via mail, phone, or our web form.

Mailing address:
Special Collections Research Center
Box 7111
Raleigh, NC, 27695-7111

Phone: (919) 515-2273

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Computer Simulation Oral History Archive, MC 00488, Special Collections Research Center, North Carolina State University Libraries, Raleigh, NC

Use of these materials

The nature of the NCSU Libraries' Special Collections means that copyright or other information about restrictions may be difficult or even impossible to determine despite reasonable efforts. The NCSU Libraries claims only physical ownership of most Special Collections materials.

The materials from our collections are made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user must assume full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used for academic research or otherwise should be fully credited with the source.

This collection may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations. Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which North Carolina State University assumes no responsibility.