Fabulous 50: New Buildings on Campus in 1969

Architectural rendering of (l to r) Bowen, Metcalf, and Carroll Halls, all dedicated in Oct. 1969.

Architectural rendering of (l to r) Bowen, Metcalf, and Carroll Halls, all dedicated in Oct. 1969.

In the midst of a building spree 50 years ago, a number of new buildings were opened, dedicated, or named in 1969.  They included the following:

 

Biltmore Hall, ca. 1970.
Biltmore Hall, ca. 1970.  The building was named in June 1969.

Biltmore Hall - Built to house the forestry program, while still under construction in June 1969 the building was named for the Biltmore Forest School (1898-1913), the first U.S. institution of higher education devoted to scientific forestry.  The building was completed and dedicated in 1970.  (The Libraries' Special Collections Research Center holds the papers of Biltmore School founder Carl Schenck.)

 

Dabney Hall, ca. 1978.
Dabney Hall, ca. 1978.  The building opened in Sept. 1969.

Dabney Hall - In Sept. 1969 it opened as the new Physical Science Lab, originally built to house the Dept. of Chemistry.  The building was named for Charles William Dabney (1855-1945), a director of the agricultural experiment station, state chemist of North Carolina, and an early advocate for the creation of NC State. 

 

Susan Colwell Carroll, namesake of Carroll Hall.  From the 1903 Agromeck yearbook.
Susan Colwell Carroll, namesake of Carroll Hall.  Photo from the 1903 Agromeck yearbook.

Bowen, Carroll, and Metcalf Residence Halls - All 3 were dedicated in Oct. 1969.  The buildings were named after Arthur F. Bowen (1872-1942), who served as the university's registrar, bursar, and treasurer; Susan Colwell Carroll (1849-1901), the first matron of the college infirmary; and Zeno P. Metcalf (1885-1956), head of the Dept. of Zoology and Entomology.  Students nicknamed the buildings "Railroad Towers" because of their proximity to the train tracks.  (As a side note, Student Government passed a motion in Oct. 1969 to allow refrigerators in all dorm rooms.)

 

Classroom in Poe Hall, 1972.
Classroom in Poe Hall, 1972.  The building was named in 1969.

Poe Hall - Poe Hall was named in Nov. 1969 while still under construction.  It was built specifically for the College of Education.  Named after Clarence Poe (1881-1964), editor of the Progressive Farmer and a member of the university's Board of Trustees, the building was completed and dedicated in 1971.

If you are interested in conducting research on these buildings, their namesakes, or the growth of the NC State campus in the 1960s and 1970s, please contact the Libraries' Special Collections Research Center.