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Vet Med Library Collection Move Begins May 2015

VetMed News - Wed, 2015-04-15 09:04

Impending Vet Med Library Collection Movement Activities (May – November 2015)

This move should not impact faculty, staff or students since all of the content to be moved is available online. It was approved by the Library and Education Resources Committee on January 28, 2015
Approximately 37 shelving units of basic science and human medicine print journals where the print duplicates our online access will be moved to the Hunt Library BookBot between May-November 2015. All material in the BookBot is freely scanned upon request should we experience any problems with our online access. The list of titles/years to be moved is below. If there are any of these titles/years for which online access is not considered sufficient, and you need the print version retained onsite, please contact Kris Alpi at kmalpi@ncsu.edu or 919-513-6219.

Titles/years: (forthcoming)

Collection Surprises

VetMed News - Mon, 2015-04-06 11:48

By Rachel Jacobson and Rose Buchanan

Floppy disks from the Raymond LeRoy Murray Papers

For processors of archival collections, it becomes second nature to look for groups of similar records produced as a result of the collection creator’s activities. When organizing collections, it is not unusual to come across materials other than paper documents. There may be relics of the past discovered amongst the files. For example, an odd floppy disk or VHS tape may turn up every now and again. Some artifacts may be a bit more unusual.

In a Special Collections Research Center with a broad collecting scope, one must be prepared to discover an occasional strange artifact. Recently, two peculiar artifacts have been discovered here at NCSU. One of the artifacts was a bit jarring while the other brightens up the collection it is a part of by contributing to the collection’s uniqueness. The jarring artifact was found as part of an addition to a collection that was already established, the James F. Wright Papers.

The unexpected artifact brings two questions to a processor’s mind. One, in which part of the collection could this artifact fit? Two, how should one store potentially hazardous materials? Answering these questions is all in a day’s work at the Special Collection Research Center. As this collection only has one series and materials are being arranged in the order they were received, the answer to the first question was not as complicated as it could have been. However, because such materials may be dangerous, it was decided that the tranquilizer gun should be held under restricted use for researchers’ safety.

Marble made from borosilicate glass, a nuclear waste storage material

Other unexpected artifacts, however, are safe to use and in fact add a sense of quirkiness to a collection. This was the case with the Raymond LeRoy Murray Papers. Dr. Murray was a physics professor at NCSU in the Nuclear Engineering program and was a key figure in establishing the University’s nuclear reactor, the first reactor operated on a college campus. While arranging his papers, processors came across a small marble made from borosilicate glass. As the card accompanying the marble said, “This nonradioactive marble is made with glass from a full-sized glass melter developed especially for defense nuclear waste.”

A quirky artifact indeed! While the marble does not pose a safety risk like the tranquilizer gun, processors still had to determine where the marble would best fit in the collection. Since the marble was discovered in a folder of “souvenirs” that Dr. Murray kept from his time in the Department of Nuclear Engineering, the processors decided to include the marble with teaching materials, rather than place it with reactor material which may fit more closely with research. This decision was made in part because of the artifact’s provenance. As the artifact was found in a previously sorted carton filled with teaching related documents, it seemed the logical choice to keep the artifact in the same series with the material stored near to it. Perhaps Dr. Murray picked the marble up during a visit to a nuclear waste disposal facility and later showed it to his students. Or Dr. Murray and others in the Department of Nuclear Engineering may have given prospective students each a marble as a “souvenir” of their visit to the University.  Either way, researchers may view this artifact, and other interesting finds, by contacting the Special Collections Research Center.

April Fools!

VetMed News - Wed, 2015-04-01 14:14

While the bookBot can carry loads of up to 500 lbs. it is certainly not intended to carry people. You can safely watch the bookBot in action from the windows in Robot Alley on the 1st floor of Hunt Library. Have a safe and fun April Fools Day!

April Fools!

NRL News - Wed, 2015-04-01 14:14

While the bookBot can carry loads of up to 500 lbs. it is certainly not intended to carry people. You can safely watch the bookBot in action from the windows in Robot Alley on the 1st floor of Hunt Library. Have a safe and fun April Fools Day!

April Fools!

Design Library News - Wed, 2015-04-01 14:14

While the bookBot can carry loads of up to 500 lbs. it is certainly not intended to carry people. You can safely watch the bookBot in action from the windows in Robot Alley on the 1st floor of Hunt Library. Have a safe and fun April Fools Day!

March 2015 Publications from CVM Authors

VetMed News - Wed, 2015-04-01 09:59

March 2015 Publications from CVM Authors
Take a look at the CVM author publications for March 2015 courtesy of the NCSU Scholarly Publications Repository.
CVM and other NCSU authors are specifically highlighted with their department affiliation and links to their other publications in the repository. To access the full text of any of these articles, click on “Find Text (NCSU Only)” link.
If you have questions or would like information about the repository or NCSU publications, please email libraryvetmed@ncsu.edu or call us at 919-513-6218.

Time to Submit Spring Selectives Reserve Readings to VML

VetMed News - Wed, 2015-04-01 08:00

The Veterinary Medicine Library has began processing Spring Selectives requests.  CVM Faculty who need to put materials on reserve may submit a reading list (or email it as an attachment to libraryvetmed@ncsu.edu) by Friday, April 10th.  To help us expedite your request, please specify the email subject as Reserve Request.  In addition to your name and course name/number, provide complete citations (title, author, and full call number) for titles desired.

The Libraries’ reserve management system offers you or your designate an opportunity to manage many aspects of the course reading page. Please visit the reserves management system at https://reserves.lib.ncsu.edu/ where you can make your requests.

For additional information on VML reserves services and quick access to the system, go to  Course Reserves. If you need assistance or have questions, please contact Betsy Whitman at libraryvetmed@ncsu.edu or phone 919-513-6218.

Vet Med Library Hours for CVM Holiday and Spring Exams (4/3 – 17)

VetMed News - Mon, 2015-03-30 10:43

These are the Vet Med Library Holiday, Pre-Finals, Reading Day and Spring Examination Hours.

April 3 (Friday): 7:30am – 6:00pm
April 6 -10 (Monday-Friday) : 6:00am – 12:00am (Midnight)
April 11 (Saturday) : 6:00am – 7:00pm
April 12 (Sunday) : 8:00am – 12:00am (Midnight)
April 13 – 16 (Monday-Thursday) : 6:00am – 12:00am (Midnight)
April 17 (Friday) : 6:00am – 7:00pm
April 18 (Saturday) : 11:00am – 7:00pm (Regular Hours Resume)

Longer hours are available at the D.H. Hill Library and James B. Hunt Library. See http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/hours/ for all NCSU Libraries Hours.

Spring “Show and Tell” at Design this Friday, March 27

Design Library News - Wed, 2015-03-25 09:44

Please join us this Friday at the College of Design in the Belk Rotunda for our Spring “Show and Tell.”

We will be bringing selected items from the following collections: the Martha Scotford Research and Study Collection on Graphic Design; the Richard C. Bell Drawings and Other Materials; the Matthew Nowicki Drawings and Other Material; the Alexander Isley Papers; the Brian Shawcroft Papers; and the Meredith Davis Papers.

We will also bring architectural drawings created by Harry Barton for the Tudor Revival S. H. Tomlinson House in High Point, North Carolina.

Please email us at library_specialcollections@ncsu.edu with any questions!

Code+Art Student Visualization Contest Finalists Announced

Design Library News - Mon, 2015-03-23 16:03

The NCSU Libraries is pleased to announce the finalist teams for its inaugural Code+Art Student Visualization Contest. Through a competitive proposal process, students are creating large-scale, data-driven “generative art” for the twenty-foot wide Art Wall and iPearl Immersion Theater at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library. The selected finalists are Anthony Smith and a team from WKNC 88.1 FM, who are working closely with Libraries staff to realize their project visions. The finalists are competing for the grand prize of $600 which will be awarded at the Code+Art reception at the Hunt Library on April 15, 2015.

Anthony Smith, a Senior in Computer Science with a concentration in Game Development, is creating Fractal Forest, a fully interactive planet that grows different plant types as guests enter the Hunt Library. The visualization will also include a sun and moon, and will depict elements including the current time and weather. As people view and participate in the work, the visualization will develop and change.

The team from WKNC 88.1 FM, NC State’s student run radio station, is creating a music visualizer of their Internet radio stream. This visualization will have an outline of the Raleigh and NC State skyline along the bottom, and various objects flying through the sky above. Each flying object will represent a current online listener. This team consists of Cameren Dolecheck, Harrison Wideman, Neal Grantham, Dylan Stein, and Colin Keesee.

This contest marks the first open call for students to create and showcase data-driven art for the video walls at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library. Mike Nutt, digital media librarian and creator of the Code+Art program says, “The video walls were installed to create a dialog with library patrons about the world around them. Code+Art re-envisions the role that data plays in a university setting, turning data into part of our library’s aesthetic fabric.”

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If you would like more information about this topic, please contact Mike Nutt at 919-513-0651 or mrnutt@ncsu.edu.

Code+Art Student Visualization Contest Finalists Announced

VetMed News - Mon, 2015-03-23 16:03

The NCSU Libraries is pleased to announce the finalist teams for its inaugural Code+Art Student Visualization Contest. Through a competitive proposal process, students are creating large-scale, data-driven “generative art” for the twenty-foot wide Art Wall and iPearl Immersion Theater at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library. The selected finalists are Anthony Smith and a team from WKNC 88.1 FM, who are working closely with Libraries staff to realize their project visions. The finalists are competing for the grand prize of $600 which will be awarded at the Code+Art reception at the Hunt Library on April 15, 2015.

Anthony Smith, a Senior in Computer Science with a concentration in Game Development, is creating Fractal Forest, a fully interactive planet that grows different plant types as guests enter the Hunt Library. The visualization will also include a sun and moon, and will depict elements including the current time and weather. As people view and participate in the work, the visualization will develop and change.

The team from WKNC 88.1 FM, NC State’s student run radio station, is creating a music visualizer of their Internet radio stream. This visualization will have an outline of the Raleigh and NC State skyline along the bottom, and various objects flying through the sky above. Each flying object will represent a current online listener. This team consists of Cameren Dolecheck, Harrison Wideman, Neal Grantham, Dylan Stein, and Colin Keesee.

This contest marks the first open call for students to create and showcase data-driven art for the video walls at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library. Mike Nutt, digital media librarian and creator of the Code+Art program says, “The video walls were installed to create a dialog with library patrons about the world around them. Code+Art re-envisions the role that data plays in a university setting, turning data into part of our library’s aesthetic fabric.”

# # #

If you would like more information about this topic, please contact Mike Nutt at 919-513-0651 or mrnutt@ncsu.edu.

Code+Art Student Visualization Contest Finalists Announced

NRL News - Mon, 2015-03-23 16:03

The NCSU Libraries is pleased to announce the finalist teams for its inaugural Code+Art Student Visualization Contest. Through a competitive proposal process, students are creating large-scale, data-driven “generative art” for the twenty-foot wide Art Wall and iPearl Immersion Theater at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library. The selected finalists are Anthony Smith and a team from WKNC 88.1 FM, who are working closely with Libraries staff to realize their project visions. The finalists are competing for the grand prize of $600 which will be awarded at the Code+Art reception at the Hunt Library on April 15, 2015.

Anthony Smith, a Senior in Computer Science with a concentration in Game Development, is creating Fractal Forest, a fully interactive planet that grows different plant types as guests enter the Hunt Library. The visualization will also include a sun and moon, and will depict elements including the current time and weather. As people view and participate in the work, the visualization will develop and change.

The team from WKNC 88.1 FM, NC State’s student run radio station, is creating a music visualizer of their Internet radio stream. This visualization will have an outline of the Raleigh and NC State skyline along the bottom, and various objects flying through the sky above. Each flying object will represent a current online listener. This team consists of Cameren Dolecheck, Harrison Wideman, Neal Grantham, Dylan Stein, and Colin Keesee.

This contest marks the first open call for students to create and showcase data-driven art for the video walls at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library. Mike Nutt, digital media librarian and creator of the Code+Art program says, “The video walls were installed to create a dialog with library patrons about the world around them. Code+Art re-envisions the role that data plays in a university setting, turning data into part of our library’s aesthetic fabric.”

# # #

If you would like more information about this topic, please contact Mike Nutt at 919-513-0651 or mrnutt@ncsu.edu.

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