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Architects' and Firms' Records Known to have been Destroyed, Lost, or Dispersed


A. G. Bauer
Raleigh

Practiced in North Carolina late nineteenth century. Although some correspondence and his memoirs survive, drawings are scarce. Photocopies of his memoirs and letters are deposited at the North Carolina State Archives. See William B. Bushong. "A. G. Bauer, North Carolina's New South Architect." North Carolina Historical Review 60 (July 1983): 304-332.

Henry E. Bonitz
Wilmington

Practiced in North Carolina early twentieth century. Most original drawings were lost when his widow washed out his linen drawings to use for napkins and tablecloths. (Interview with his grandson, John Bonitz, August 1994.) A floor plan and another drawing of the Weil House are in the posession of the owner. (Janet K. Seapker, architectural historian and historic preservation consultant)

Douglas Ellington
Asheville

Practiced in North Carolina early to mid twentieth century. Significant amount of his original work was lost when a storage shed collapsed. (Interview with his niece, Sallie Middleton, August 1994.)

Charles C. Hartmann
Greensboro

Practiced in North Carolina early and mid twentieth century. Upon his retirement from practice in 1969, he returned and sold most of his work to his clients. (Telephone interview with Ralph Austin, October 1994.)

Charles Christian Hook
Charlotte

Practiced in North Carolina early twentieth century. Significant amount of his original work was lost. A very limited amount remains with Freeman White and a few drawings are held by the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, J. Murrey Atkins Library. (Survey response of the firm of Freeman White, July 1994.)

Charles Barton Keene
Winston-Salem & Philadelphia

Practiced in North Carolina in the early twentieth century. The day after his death his daughter burned all of Keene's work. (Telephone interview with Ed Davis, October 1994.)

Luther Lashmit
Winston-Salem

Practiced in North Carolina mid twentieth century. Upon his retirement from practice, his papers and drawings were dispersed among his clients. Much of his work reflecting his time with the firm of Northup & O'Brien is preserved with that firm's papers at North Carolina State University Libraries, Special Collections Research Center. Some renderings and drawings and student work are owned by Thomas Calloway of Winston-Salem, given to him by Lashmit. (Telephone interview with Tom Gray and Tom Calloway, September 1994.)

Lynch & Foard, Architects
Wilmington

Practiced in North Carolina early and mid twentieth century. When the firm closed all files and drawings were set out for the trash collector. A member of the Lower Cape Fear Historical Society saved them, returning identifiable work to the building owners, and destroying the remainder. (Telephone interviews with Leslie N. Boney, Jr. and Edward Turberg, June 1994)

William Nichols
Raleigh & southeastern United States

Practiced in Raleigh early nineteenth century. Hardly any amount of his drawings or correspondence survives, other than indirect references. (Telephone interview with John Sanders, October 1994.)

David Paton
Raleigh, New York & Edinburgh, Scotland

Practiced in North Carolina mid nineteenth century. After a dispute with state officials, Paton took all drawings of the State Capitol (most likely including the work of Town & Davis) with him and returned to New York. Paton claimed to have made over 220 drawings for the State Capitol. After his death in 1880, the drawings passed to his son, whose wife eventually destroyed the drawings ca. 1900. No documentation exists for this account other than family tradition. (Telephone interview with John Sanders, October 1994.)

William Percival
Raleigh & Richmond

Practiced in North Carolina 1857-1860. Almost none of Percival's work survives, only indirect references in advertisements, minutes, newspapers, etc. See William B. Bushong, "William Percival in the Old North State, 1857-1860." North Carolina Historical Review 57:3 (July 1980): 310-339.

James F. Post
Wilmington

Practiced in North Carolina mid to late nineteenth century. Post's office burned on May 4, 1891 (Wilmington Messenger). Only one set of Post's original drawings survives, those for the William B. McCoy residence in Wilmington, 1887. (Telephone interview with Jonathan Noftke, June 1994.) See also Janet K. Seapker, "James F. Post, Builder-Architect: the Legend and the Ledger." Lower Cape Fear Historical Society, Inc. Bulletin 30:3 (May 1987): 1-3.

George Pyne, Harris & Pyne
Durham

Practiced mid to late twentieth century. Work of George Pyne and the firm of Harris & Pyne was dispersed and returned to clients when George Pyne retired.  (Survey response of George Pyne, July 1994)  George Pyne died in 1997.

Samuel Sloan
Raleigh & Philadelphia

Practiced in North Carolina mid to late 19th century. Almost none of Sloan's work survives, only indirect references in advertisements, minutes, newspapers, etc. (See Harold N. Cooledge, Jr. Samuel Sloan: Architect of Philadelphia, 1815-1884. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1986.)