Scribbling Women

Scribbling WomenScribbling Women, a project of The Public Media Foundation, dramatizes stories by historically significant American women writers including Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Jacobs, Willa Cather and Zora Neale Hurston, for national radio broadcast. Learn about this remarkable art form in two separate programs:

 

Saturday, April 5 at 10:00 a.m.

Highlighting African American Women’s Voices through Scribblingwomen

and

Sunday, April 6 at 11:00 a.m.

“Scribbling Women and the Gutbucket King: New Waves for Audio Drama and Documentary”

 

***
SESSION ONE: Highlighting African American Women’s Voices through Scribblingwomen

Saturday, April 5 at 10:00 a.m., Teaching and Visualization Studio, 4th Floor

Attendees will learn about:

Harriet Jacobs, excerpts from a radio play of Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. Moderated by Lucinda MacKethan
Zora Neale Hurston, excerpts from a radio play  of her short story, “Sweat.” Moderated by Traci Fellers.
Shirlette Ammons: an a capella performance of lyrics from Shirlette’s current project, Twilight for Gladys Bentley. The project is a ‘re-imagining’ of 1920′s blues singer and ‘bulldagger’ Gladys Bentley.

Bios
Shirlette Ammons is a Durham NC based poet musician whose most recent works include a collaborative album with Chapel Hill based rock band, The Dynamite Brotherscalled And Lover’s Like. Her most recent collection of poetry, Matching Skin featuring The John Anonymous EP was published by Carolina Wren Press in 2008. Shirlette’s first collection entitled Stumphole: Aunthology of Backwoods Blood was published by Big Drum Press in 2002. Her literary work has appeared in The Ringing Ear: Black Poets Lean South, What Your Momma Never Tod You: True Stories About Love and Sex, The Asheville Revielw and The Journal of the Academy of American Poets amongst other publications. She has recieved a John Hope Franklin Grant for Documentary Studies, The Ebony Harlem Award for Literary Achievement, as well as Emerging Artist Grants from the Durham Arts COuncil and the United Arts Council. She is also vocalist for the hip hop rock band Mosadi Music whose debut album, The Window, was released in 2006 and songwriter and vocalist for the fusion electronic duo, Jon Anonymous.

Tracie Fellers is a writer and editor who started her career writing for daily newspapers in North Carolina and Virginia.  She has written columns and articles for The Durham News of the News & Observer since 2011, and has published articles and commentaries on thegrio.com and theroot.com.  Her fiction has appeared in Obsidian, Long Story Short: Flash Fiction by Sixty-Five of North Carolina’s Finest Writers, and roger; her creative nonfiction has been published in 27 Views of Raleigh, an anthology, and the journal Sing Heavenly Muse!  She has taught writing and literature at N.C. A&T State University, Guilford College, Bennett College and NC State University, and has received awards for her fiction from NC State and the National Council for Black Studies.

Dr. Lucinda MacKethan is Alumni Distinguished Professor of English Emerita at NC State University, where she taught courses in Writing, Southern literature, and African American literature. She also served as Director of Creative Writing and Director of the English teacher education program. She is the author or editor of six books, including Daughters of Time: Creating Women’s Voice in Southern Story and the co-edited Companion to Southern Literature, named a “Best Reference Work” by the American Library Association. She currently leads online webinars for the National Humanities and is a “Road Scholar” for the NC Humanities Council.  Since 1992, she has been senior consultant for the award winning website, Scribblingwomen.org, which features radio plays adapted from stories by American women writers.
***
SESSION TWO: 

“Scribbling Women and the Gutbucket King: New Waves for Audio Drama and Documentary”
Sunday, April 6 at 11:00 a.m., Teaching and Visualization Studio, 4th Floor
Audio drama and documentary have a long history, beginning with early 20th century radio production, declining with the rise of television in the 1950s, and coming to life again in the digital age.
This session will offers audiences an overview of that audio history and introduce 2 new audio forms:  the on-line dramas of the Scribbling Women website–plays adapted from American women’s short stories–and the award-winning, multi-media storytelling of journalist Barry Yeoman, particularly his work on New Orleans bluesman Little Freddie King, an epic story of migration, music, bloodshed, race, and redemption.
The session will end by giving audience members the chance to participate in the production of a scene in an audio drama, complete with sound effects!
Session Panelists:
Barry’s work has appeared in Parade; The American Prospect; O, The Oprah Magazine; OnEarth; Saturday Evening Post; Discover; The New York Times; AARP The Magazine; Mother Jones; Audubon; Rolling Stone; Reader’s Digest; The Nation; Psychology Today; salon.com; Good Housekeeping; and many other publications. It has been translated into Russian, Portuguese, Spanish and Italian and reprinted around the world, from Great Britain to Japan. It has won him a slew of accolades. Columbia Journalism Review, the nation’s premiere journalism magazine, named Barry one of nine investigative reporters who are “out of the spotlight but on the mark.” The Columbia University School of Journalism and Poynter Institute have described Barry’s work as “the essence of excellence.” Project Censored has honored him four times for writing about undercovered issues.
Lucinda MacKethan:
Dr. Lucinda MacKethan is Alumni Distinguished Professor of English Emerita at NC State University, where she taught courses in Writing, Southern literature, and African American literature. She also served as Director of Creative Writing and Director of the English teacher education program. She is the author or editor of six books, including Daughters of Time: Creating Women’s Voice in Southern Story and the co-edited Companion to Southern Literature, named a “Best Reference Work” by the American Library Association. She currently leads online webinars for the National Humanities and is a “Road Scholar” for the NC Humanities Council.  Since 1992, she has been senior consultant for the award winning website, Scribblingwomen.org, which features radio plays adapted from stories by American women writers.
Deborah Hooker:  moderator
Deborah is currently the Director of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program at NCSU and a lover of radio drama.