North Carolina State University, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Department of Crop Science Records 1938-2003

Creator
North Carolina State University. Department of Crop Science
Size
66 linear feet
Location

For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the Special Collections Research Center Reference Staff.

Call number
UA 100.016

The North Carolina State University Department of Crop Science Records include correspondence and memoranda, administrative materials, research materials, materials related to its extension program, and publications. Included is information on curricula and teaching, budgets, research projects, professional organizations related to crop science, and research topics. Materials range in date from 1938 to 2003. Series 6 pertains to the Maize Breeding and Genetics Program and contains photographs, records, correspondence, publications, and data pertaining to the program. The material in this series ranges in date from the 1920s to the 1990s.

The North Carolina State University Department of Crop Science began as the Division of Agronomy in the School of Agriculture at the beginning of the 1900s. In 1924, reorganization led to the Division of Agronomy becoming the Department of Agronomy. In 1952, a new building, Williams Hall, was opened, designed to house the by then large department. At the beginning of 1956, Agronomy was divided into the Department of Field Crops and the Department of Soil Science. In 1962, Field Crops changed its name to the Department of Crop Science to better reflect its focus. Dr. Major Goodman has been head of the Maize Breeding and Genetics program since 1983. This program improves upon traditional maize breeding through the incorporation of exotic germplasm and qunatitative genetics theory. It is still in operation and headed by Dr. Goodman as of 2013.

Biographical/historical note

The Department of Crop Science in the College of Agriculture and Life Science at North Carolina State University works on improving the production and profitability of a diverse assortment of North Carolina crops. Over time, the department has evolved from a small staff and narrow research focus into a large, comprehensive program that can respond to changing agricultural needs.

The Department of Crop Science began as the Division of Agronomy in the School of Agriculture at the beginning of the 1900s. Prior to the formation of the division, however, agronomic research and teaching had been conducted through the Agricultural Research Station and in the general course of study in agriculture at the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts (later to become North Carolina State University).

In 1924, reorganization led to the Division of Agronomy becoming the Department of Agronomy, and throughout the next several decades, the department grew in staff and scope. The Great Depression caused many agricultural problems in North Carolina, but new funds allotted to the Department of Agronomy helped expand the research and teaching capabilities of the department.

In 1952, a new building, Williams Hall, was opened, designed to house the by then large department. At the beginning of 1956, Agronomy was divided into the Department of Field Crops and the Department of Soil Science. In 1962, Field Crops changed its name to the Department of Crop Science to better reflect its focus.

Although the department is still housed in Williams Hall, it also staffs a number of research stations around the state. To further expand its scope, the department also works closely with the North Carolina Agricultural Research Service and the North Carolina Department of Agriculture. In addition, the Department of Crop Science also works with a Crop Science Cooperative Extension program to reach out to farmers around the state. It has also developed curricula for the Agricultural Institute, a two-year technical training program.

The Maize Breeding and Genetics Program at North Carolina State University was established by the United States Department of Agriculture in 1960, and overseen by the USDA until 1983, when control of the program was turned over to NC State. The purpose of the program is to contribute to the development and release of improved maize inbred lines to show superior agronomic performance and yield potential. The Maize Breeding and Genetics program is currently directed by Dr. Major Goodman.

Additional information and resources on the history of the Department of Crop Science can be found through the NCSU Historical State website.

1956 - 1974
Paul H. Harvey
1974 - 1975
Philip A. Miller
1976 - 1988
Billy E. Caldwell
1989 - 1992
Johnny C. Wynne
1992 - 1994
William K. Collins
1994 - 1998
David A. Knauft
1999 - 2007
Thomas Stalker
2007 - 2011
W. David Smith
2012
John Jeffery Mullahey

Scope/content

The North Carolina State University Department of Crop Science Records include correspondence and memoranda, administrative materials, research materials, materials related to its extension program, and publiations. Included is information on curricula and teaching, budgets, research projects, professional organizations related to crop science, and research topics. Materials range in date from 1938 to 2003.

  • North Carolina Agricultural Research Service--History.
  • North Carolina State University. College of Agriculture and Life Sciences--History.
  • North Carolina State University. Dept. of Crop Science--History.
  • Crop science--Research--North Carolina.
  • Crop science--Study and teaching--North Carolina.
  • Tobacco--Research--North Carolina.

Physical description

39 archival boxes, 32 cartons

Arrangement

The records of the North Carolina State University Department of Crop Science are organized into six series: Correspondence and Memoranda, Administrative, Research, Extension, Publications, and Maize Breeding and Genetics Program. Within each of the first five series, materials are arranged alphabetically by topic or title. In Series 6, Maize Breeding and Genetics Program, materials are grouped by type of material and arranged chronologically.

Use of these materials

The nature of the NCSU Libraries' Special Collections means that copyright or other information about restrictions may be difficult or even impossible to determine despite reasonable efforts. The NCSU Libraries claims only physical ownership of most Special Collections materials.

The materials from our collections are made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user must assume full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used for academic research or otherwise should be fully credited with the source.

This collection may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations. Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which North Carolina State University assumes no responsibility.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], North Carolina State University, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Department of Crop Science Records, UA 100.016, Special Collections Research Center, North Carolina State University Libraries, Raleigh, NC

Related material

Source of acquisition

Transferred from North Carolina State University, Department of Crop Science.

Twelve folders in the Administrative Series were transferred from the Major M. Goodman Papers, MC 00184, in March 2012.

Processing information

Processed by Valerie Gillispie, Flora Blackley, 2009 July; Machine-readable finding aid created by Pat Webber; finding aid updated by: Flora Blackley, 2009 July; Cate Putirskis, 2009 July, 2010 April; Todd Kosmerick, 2011 February; Beverly King, 2012 May-April; Kelsey Chandler, 2012 November; Todd Kosmerick, 2013 June.

The entire collection, including materials not available online, may be viewed in the Special Collections reading room in D.H. Hill Library.

Access to the collection

This collection is open for research; access requires at least 48 hours advance notice.

For more information contact us via mail, phone, or our web form.

Mailing address:
Special Collections Research Center
Box 7111
Raleigh, NC, 27695-7111

Phone: (919) 515-2273

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], North Carolina State University, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Department of Crop Science Records, UA 100.016, Special Collections Research Center, North Carolina State University Libraries, Raleigh, NC

Use of these materials

The nature of the NCSU Libraries' Special Collections means that copyright or other information about restrictions may be difficult or even impossible to determine despite reasonable efforts. The NCSU Libraries claims only physical ownership of most Special Collections materials.

The materials from our collections are made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user must assume full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used for academic research or otherwise should be fully credited with the source.

This collection may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations. Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which North Carolina State University assumes no responsibility.