North Carolina State University, Office of the Chancellor, John Tyler Caldwell Records 1959-1975

Creator
North Carolina State University. Office of the Chancellor
Size
80.25 linear feet
Location
For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the Special Collections Research Center Reference Staff.
Call number
UA 002.001.004
Access to materials

Portions of this collection have restricted access; the remainder of this collection is open for research; access requires at least 48 hours advance notice.

The records of John Tyler Caldwell’s administration in the Office of the Chancellor at North Carolina State College (later, University) include correspondence, newspaper clippings, reports, minutes, and other administrative papers. Topics include capital improvements, the building of Carter (later Carter-Finley) Stadium, the name change from State College to North Carolina State University, the status of African Americans and women on campus, and student unrest regarding the Vietnam War. Materials range in date from 1959 to 1975.

After serving as President of the University of Arkansas from 1952-1959, John Tyler Caldwell accepted the chancellorship at North Carolina State College (later, North Carolina State University) and remained chancellor from 1959 to 1975. After retiring, Caldwell taught political science and education courses at North Carolina State University until 1985, and was president of the Triangle Universities Center for Advanced Research (1975-1982). Under his leadership, the student and faculty population nearly doubled, the School of Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics was established, and for the first time the university offered a full range of degree programs in the humanities and social sciences.

Biographical/historical note

The Chancellor is the chief administrative and executive officer, leader and spokesperson of North Carolina State University. The Chancellor, who has complete executive authority for the university, subject to the direction of the president and the board of trustees, defines the scope and authority of faculties, councils, committees, and officers of North Carolina State University, is a member of all faculties and other academic bodies of the university, and has the right to preside over the deliberations of the legislative bodies of the faculties of the institution. The Office of the Chancellor retains authority in faculty and EPA personnel, student matters, contracts, leases, and other agreements, and the acquisition and disposition of property.

The title of the head of North Carolina State University has changed over time. First the university was led by a president (1889-1934), then a vice president of the Consolidated University (1934), then a dean of Administration (1934-1945), and finally a chancellor (1945-present).

John Tyler Caldwell was born in Yazoo City, Mississippi, on December 11, 1911. He earned a bachelor of science degree from Mississippi State College (1932), master's degrees from Duke University (1936) and Columbia University (1937), and a doctoral degree in political science from Princeton University (1939) as a Julius Rosenwald Fellow. A political science instructor, Caldwell taught at Holmes Junior College from 1932 to 1936 and at Vanderbilt University from 1939 to 1947. He entered the United States Navy as an Ensign in 1942, eventually earning a Bronze Star Medal for his service in Okinawa. In 1947, Alabama College (now the University of Montevallo) selected Caldwell as their president ( 1947-1952). He served as President of the University of Arkansas from 1952 to 1959. After serving as President of the University of Arkansas, Caldwell accepted the chancellorship at North Carolina State College (later, North Carolina State University) and remained chancellor from 1959 to 1975. After retiring, Caldwell taught political science and education courses at North Carolina State University until 1985, and was president of the Triangle Universities Center for Advanced Research ( 1975-1982). Under his leadership, the student and faculty population nearly doubled, the School of Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics was established, and for the first time the university offered a full range of degree programs in the humanities and social sciences.

In 1976, NCSU named its most prestigious merit-based scholarships in Caldwell's honor, the John T. Caldwell Merit Scholarships. A popular orator, Caldwell continually gave speeches for various organizations and causes. Caldwell died on October 13, 1995.

Scope/content

The records of John Tyler Caldwell reflect much of what was occuring in the United States at the time. Topics include controversial laws such as the North Carolina “Speaker Ban” law and “loyalty oath” of the National Education Defense Act. Other topics reflective of national trends include student unrest arising from the Vietnam War and the Kent State shootings of May 4th 1970, the integration of more African-Americans into the workforce and student body, and the election of the first female student body president, Cathy Sterling. There is correspondence with presidents Harry Truman, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, and Richard Nixon, as well as contact with members of the North Carolina legislature and the United States Congress. Correspondence between Caldwell and Jesse Helms (as vice president of WRAL-TV and later Senator) reflects many of the issues of the day.

Other topics specific to North Carolina State College (later University) include the name change of “college” to “university,” the building of a new football stadium named Carter Stadium (later, Carter-Finley), the maintenance and safety concerns of a nuclear reactor on campus, and athletic events and issues. The expansion of the university is represented by the establishment of the Agricultural Policy Institute, the School of Physical Science and Applied Mathematics, and the School of Liberal Arts. Enrollment exceeded 20,000 and the total number of degrees awarded reached 50,000.

The records of the Office of the Chancellor during John Caldwell’s administration range in date from 1959-1975.

Physical description

155 boxes, 3 half boxes, 2 flat folders

Arrangement

The records of the Office of the Chancellor during John Tyler Caldwell's administration are arranged chronologically, and then alphabetically by topic within.

Use of these materials

The nature of the NCSU Libraries' Special Collections means that copyright or other information about restrictions may be difficult or even impossible to determine despite reasonable efforts. The NCSU Libraries claims only physical ownership of most Special Collections materials.

The materials from our collections are made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user must assume full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used for academic research or otherwise should be fully credited with the source.

This collection may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations. Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which North Carolina State University assumes no responsibility.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], North Carolina State University, Office of the Chancellor, John Tyler Caldwell Records, UA 002.001.004, Special Collections Research Center, North Carolina State University Libraries, Raleigh, NC

Source of acquisition

Transferred by North Carolina State University, Office of the Chancellor.

Processing information

Processed by: Cathy Dorin-Black, Alston Brake, Dani Moore, 2010 July; Finding aid written by: Cathy Dorin-Black, Alston Brake, Dani Moore, 2010 July.

Access to the collection

Portions of this collection have restricted access; the remainder of this collection is open for research; access requires at least 48 hours advance notice.

For more information contact us via mail, phone, or our web form.

Mailing address:
Special Collections Research Center
Box 7111
Raleigh, NC, 27695-7111

Phone: (919) 515-2273

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], North Carolina State University, Office of the Chancellor, John Tyler Caldwell Records, UA 002.001.004, Special Collections Research Center, North Carolina State University Libraries, Raleigh, NC

Use of these materials

The nature of the NCSU Libraries' Special Collections means that copyright or other information about restrictions may be difficult or even impossible to determine despite reasonable efforts. The NCSU Libraries claims only physical ownership of most Special Collections materials.

The materials from our collections are made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user must assume full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used for academic research or otherwise should be fully credited with the source.

This collection may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations. Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which North Carolina State University assumes no responsibility.