North Carolina State University, Office of the Chancellor, Early Chancellors Records 1891-1934

Creators
North Carolina State College. Office of the Chancellor; North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts
Size
4 linear feet
Call number
UA 002.001.001

The records of the Early Chancellors in the Office of the Chancellor of, at first the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts and then North Carolina State College, include correspondence, telegrams, annual reports, policy statements, booklets, financial records, programs, photographs, newspaper clippings, blueprints, and various professional papers related to education and agriculture in North Carolina. Topics include military training and discipline, the naming of dormitories in honor of former students of the College who died overseas in the World War, budget records, and the consolidation of three North Carolina higher educational institutions. The records of the first five administrations range in date from 1891 to 1934.

The “Early Chancellors” include the first five chief executives, or presidents, of first the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts and then North Carolina State College. Alexander Quarles Holladay was the first chief executive of North Carolina College for Agriculture and Mechanic Arts (1889-1899). The second chief executive was George Tayloe Winston (1899-1908). The third chief executive was Daniel Harvey Hill, Jr. (1908-1916). Wallace Carl Riddick was the fourth chief executive of the College (1916-1923). Eugene Clyde Brooks was the fifth chief exective of the College (1923-1934).

Biographical/historical note

The Chancellor is the chief administrative and executive officer, leader and spokesperson of North Carolina State University. The Chancellor, who has complete executive authority for the university, subject to the direction of the president and the board of trustees, defines the scope and authority of faculties, councils, committees, and officers of North Carolina State University, is a member of all faculties and other academic bodies of the university, and has the right to preside over the deliberations of the legislative bodies of the faculties of the institution. The Office of the Chancellor retains authority in faculty and EPA personnel, student matters, contracts, leases, and other agreements, and the acquisition and disposition of property.

The title of the head of North Carolina State University has changed over time. First the university was led by a president (1889-1934), then a vice president of the Consolidated University (1934), then a dean of Administration (1934-1945), and finally a chancellor (1945-present).

The “Early Chancellors” include the first five chief executives, or presidents, of first the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts and then North Carolina State College. Alexander Quarles Holladay was the first chief executive of North Carolina College for Agriculture and Mechanic Arts (1889-1899). The second chief executive was George Tayloe Winston (1899-1908). The third chief executive was Daniel Harvey Hill (1908-1916). Eugene Clyde Brooks was the fifth chief exective of the College (1923-1934).

(For further biographical information on each chancellor and his administration, see the relevant series notes.)

Scope/content

The records of the Early Chancellors in the Office of the Chancellor at first the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts and then North Carolina State College include correspondence, telegrams, annual reports, policy statements, booklets, financial records, programs, photographs, newspaper clippings, blueprints, and various professional papers related to education and agriculture in North Carolina.

Topics include military training and discipline, growth and reorganization of the College, appropriations and construction for buildings and grounds, the naming of dormitories in honor of former students of the College who died overseas in the first World War, budget and other financial issues, the 25th and the 40th anniversary celebrations at the College, the renaming of the College, and the Consolidation of the University of North Carolina colleges, enlarging and improving the athletic stadium facilities on Riddick field, the YMCA, Governor O. Max Gardner, hazing, evolution, faculty compensation.

The records of the Office of the Chancellor during the first five administrations range in date from 1891 to 1934.

Physical description

6 archival boxes, 1 archival flat box

Arrangement

The records of the Office of the Chancellor during the early chancellors' administrations are organized into five series:

  • Alexander Quarles Holladay Records
  • ,
  • George Tayloe Winston Records
  • ,
  • Daniel Harvey Hill Records
  • ,
  • Wallace Carl Riddick Records
  • , and
  • Eugene Clyde Brooks Records
.

Use of these materials

The nature of the NCSU Libraries' Special Collections means that copyright or other information about restrictions may be difficult or even impossible to determine despite reasonable efforts. The NCSU Libraries claims only physical ownership of most Special Collections materials.

The materials from our collections are made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user must assume full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used for academic research or otherwise should be fully credited with the source.

This collection may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations. Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which North Carolina State University assumes no responsibility.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], North Carolina State University, Office of the Chancellor, Early Chancellors Records, UA 002.001.001, Special Collections Research Center, North Carolina State University Libraries, Raleigh, NC

Source of acquisition

Transferred from North Carolina State University, Office of the Chancellor.

Processing information

Processed by: Barbara Weinberg and Flora Blackley, 2010 April; Finding Aid written by: Barbara Weinberg and Flora Blackley, 2010 April.

Alexander Quarles Holladay Records 1891-1895

Alexander Quarles Holladay, the first Chief Executive of the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, was born in Cherry Grove, Virginia, in 1839. Holladay studied at the University of Virginia and the University of Berlin, specializing in Latin, Greek, modern languages, moral philosophy, and law. After service as a colonel in the 19th Virginia Regiment during the Civil War, Holladay spent several years farming and practicing law, and served in the Virginia Senate for four years. In 1889, Colonel Holladay applied to the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts for the position of professor of English, but the Board of Trustees appointed him as the first college president instead. Holladay served the institution until failing health forced his retirement in 1899. He died in Raleigh, North Carolina, in 1909.

North Carolina College for Agriculture and Mechanic Arts opened in 1889 with one building--the current Holladay Hall, six faculty members, 50 students, and courses in the agricultural and mechanical arts. A curriculum in applied science was added in 1893. By the turn of the century, the College had grown to some half dozen buildings, enrollment reached 300, and the College had begun to diversify its curricula.

The records of Alexander Quarles Holladay’s administration include correspondence and an annual report.

Topics include the annual report of the Boarding Department of the College, budget for providing students with good room and board with healthy, nutritious, well-balanced meals that varied with the seasons. Other issues considered were pay for good cooks, servants, fuel, wear and tear, etc., and the forming of clubs, which meant many students began living off-campus.

The records of Alexander Quarles Holladay’s adminstration range in date from 1891 to 1895.

Correspondence/Announcements 1891-1895
Box 1, Folder 1
George Tayloe Winston Records 1899-1906

George Tayloe Winston was born in 1852 in Windsor, North Carolina. Winston was educated in the Horner School, located in Oxford, North Carolina; the University of North Carolina, which he entered at the age of thirteen; the United States Naval Academy, where he ranked first in his class; and Cornell University, where he was awarded the Latin Scholarship Medal and elected a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society. In 1899, Winston became the second president of the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. Winston retired in 1908, and accepted a lifetime annuity from the Carnegie Foundation for his service to Southern education. He died in Durham, North Carolina, in 1932.

While Winston was in office, the college developed a new curriculum in textiles, and began offering summer courses for public school teachers for the first time.

The records of George Tayloe Winston’s administration include correspondence, reports, policies and a booklet entitled "Industrial Education and the Use of Machinery Essential to the Development of North Carolina," an address by President George T. Winston, and other informational booklets.

Topics include policies regarding military training and discipline, arrangements for the immediate erection of a building for Textiles instruction and its equipment, scholarships, a letter from the president recruiting students, results and recommendations of the Sanitation Committee, the decision to have a separate Board of Trustees for the College and the Department of Agriculture, and a biennial report from President Winston to the Governor for transmission to the Legislature.

The records of George Tayloe Winston’s adminstration range in date from 1899 to 1906.

Copies of letters written primarily to prospective students 1899
Flat box 7
Correspondence, Reports, Etc. 1899-1906
Box 1, Folder 2
Daniel Harvey Hill Records 1908-1916

The third chief executive of the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, Daniel Harvey Hill was born in 1859 in Davidson, North Carolina. He received his B.A., M.A., and Litt.D. degrees from Davidson College in 1880, 1886, and 1905, respectively. In 1910, Hill received a Doctor of Law degree from the University of North Carolina. In 1889, Hill became a professor of English and bookkeeping at North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. He was one of the first six faculty members, and eventually, also served as the college’s librarian. In 1908, Daniel Harvey Hill was selected as President of the college, the first "insider" to hold the position, and served until 1916. Hill died in 1924 in Blowing Rock, North Carolina.

During Hill’s tenure, the Agricultural Extension Service was established, the College celebrated its 25th anniversary, enrollment grew to more than 700, and the College accepted a conditional gift from Mr. John D. Rockefeller for a YMCA building.

The records of Daniel Harvey Hill's administration in the Office of the Chancellor include correspondence, financial records, policies, reports and a program.

Topics include the successful 25th Anniversary Celebration at the College, a $20,000 conditional gift from Mr. John D. Rockefeller for the YMCA building, financial statements, the State of North Carolina definition and policy on hazing, and a copy of a letter from President Hill announcing his retirement to his former students.

The records of the Office of the Chancellor during Daniel Harvey Hill's adminstration range in date from 1908 to 1916.

Correspondence, Etc. 1908-1916
Box 1, Folder 3
Wallace Carl Riddick Records 1916-1923

The fourth chief executive of the College, Wallace Carl Riddick was born in Wake County, North Carolina, in 1864. He received his B.A. in 1885 from the University of North Carolina, and a degree in civil engineering in 1890 from Lehigh University. In addition, Riddick received honorary LL.D. degrees from Wake Forest College and Lehigh University. Riddick joined the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts (A College) in 1892 as a professor of mechanics and applied mathematics. In 1895, he became the college’s first professor of civil engineering. Riddick served as the vice president of the college from 1908 until 1916, when he became the fourth president of A College. In 1923, Riddick resigned his position as president to become the first dean of North Carolina State’s School of Engineering. In 1939, North Carolina State College gave Riddick an honorary doctoral degree in engineering. Wallace Carl Riddick died in 1942.

During Riddick’s tenure, the name of the College changed from North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts to North Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering (1917) to reflect the increased emphasis on professional and theoretical aspects of technical education. Also during his term, President Riddick initiated the administrative reorganization of the College, a necessity due to increased enrollment and larger numbers of faculty and staff.

The records of Wallace Carl Riddick’s administration include correspondence, policy statements, financial records, general reports and records, and a program.

Topics include the military (ROTC), appropriations and construction for buildings and grounds, an unsigned letter to the Building Committee stating that the Committee should give "the 1200 boys a gymnasium, and a good one,” budget and other financial issues, a report from Consultant George F. Zook on the reorganization of the college, and a program from the Inauguration of Wallace Carl Riddick, as the fourth President of North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts on February 22, 1917. The records of Wallace Carl Riddick’s adminstration range in date from 1916 to 1923.

Reserve Officers' Training Corps 1916-1923
Box 1, Folder 4
Riddick Inauguration 1917
Box 1, Folder 5
Correspondence, Etc. 1918-1923
Box 1, Folder 6
Buildings 1922-1923
Box 1, Folder 7
Zook Report 1922-1923
Box 1, Folder 8
Eugene Clyde Brooks Records 1923-1934

Born in 1871 in Greene County, North Carolina, Eugene Brooks graduated from Trinity College (later Duke University) in 1894 with an A.B. degree. Brooks was awarded a Litt.D. degree from Davidson College in 1918. Brooks worked on newspapers and he served as teacher, principal and superindentent at a number of North Carolina schools. In 1906, he founded the Journal of North Carolina Education, and served as its editor until 1923. From 1907 to 1919, Brooks headed the Trinity College Department of Education, and was state superindentent of public instruction in North Carolina from 1919 to 1923.

In 1923, Brooks became president of North Carolina State College, and he oversaw a major organization. During his tenure, the Schools of Agriculture, Science and Business, Education, Textiles and Engineering came into existence, as did the Graduate School. Brooks headed the college until 1934. He died in Raleigh, North Carolina, in 1947.

The records of Eugene Clyde Brooks' administration in the Office of the Chancellor include correspondence, annual and budget reports, newspaper clippings, blueprints, photographs, a summary of bulletins and articles published by the Department of Botany, and various professional papers related to education and agriculture in North Carolina. Topics include the consolidation of the University of North Carolina, North Carolina State College, and the Woman’s College of the University of North Carolina (later the University of North Carolina at Greensboro). The purpose of consolidation was to prevent duplication of programs and to promote educational efficiency. Other topics include the administrative reorganization of the College, student military service, faculty compensation, and the teaching of evolution at North Carolina State College.

The records of the Office of the President during Eugene Clyde Brooks administration range in date from 1923 to 1934.

Arranged by academic year and then alphabetically.

Administrative Organization 1923-1924
Box 1, Folder 9
Buildings 1923-1924
Box 1, Folder 10
Committees 1923-1924
Box 1, Folder 11
Correspondence 1923-1924
Box 1, Folder 12
Faculty 1923-1924
Box 1, Folder 13
Mathematics 1923
Box 1, Folder 14
State Fair Property 1923-1924
Box 1, Folder 15
Statistics 1923-1924
Box 1, Folder 16
Brooks Inauguration 1924-1925
Box 1, Folder 17
Budget 1924-1925
Box 1, Folder 18
Buildings 1924-1925
Box 1, Folder 19
Consolidation 1924-1925
Box 1, Folder 20
Correspondence 1924-1925
Box 1, Folder 21
Engineering Education 1924-1925
Box 2, Folder 1
Faculty, Dean of the School of Agriculture 1924-1925
Box 2, Folder 2
Faculty, General 1924-1926
Box 2, Folder 3
Faculty, Resignation of the Dean of Agriculture 1924-1925
Box 2, Folder 4
Governor Angus W. McLean 1924-1925
Box 2, Folder 5
Homecoming 1924-1925
Box 2, Folder 6
Statistics and Reports 1924-1926
Box 2, Folder 7
Statistics and Reports, President's Reports 1924-1925
Box 2, Folder 8
Trustees 1924-1925
Box 2, Folder 9
Winston, George T. 1924-1925
Box 2, Folder 10
Winston, Dr. George T. 1924-1925
Box 2, Folder 11
Board of Trustees 1925-1926
Box 2, Folder 12
Budget 1925-1926
Box 2, Folder 13
Buildings 1925-1926
Box 2, Folder 14
Correspondence 1925-1926
Box 2, Folder 15
Reports, Agricultural Extension 1925-1926
Box 2, Folder 16
Reports, General 1925-1926
Box 2, Folder 17
Evolution 1925-1926
Box 2, Folder 18
Homecoming 1925-1926
Box 2, Folder 19
Budget 1926-1927
Box 2, Folder 20
Buildings 1926-1927
Box 3, Folder 1
Correspondence 1926-1927
Box 3, Folder 2
Miscellaneous 1926-1927
Box 3, Folder 3
Peele, W.J., Speech Regarding 1926-1927
Box 3, Folder 4
President's Home, Construction of 1926-1927
Box 3, Folder 5
Reports 1926-1927
Box 3, Folder 6
Trustees 1926-1927
Box 3, Folder 7
Budget 1927-1928
Box 3, Folder 8
Buildings 1927-1928
Box 3, Folder 9
Controller 1927-1928
Box 3, Folder 10
Correspondence 1927-1928
Box 3, Folder 11
Faculty Publications List 1927-1928
Box 3, Folder 12
President's Home, Construction of 1927-1928
Box 3, Folder 13
Reports 1927-1928
Box 3, Folder 14
Trustees, Executive Committee 1927-1928
Box 3, Folder 15
Trustees, General 1927-1928
Box 3, Folder 16
Budget 1932-1933
Box 3, Folder 17
Buildings 1932-1933
Box 3, Folder 18
Faculty Council 1932-1933
Box 3, Folder 19
Forestry Department 1932-1933
Box 3, Folder 20
Stadium 1932-1933
Box 3, Folder 21
Statistics 1932-1933
Box 3, Folder 22
Budget 1928-1929
Box 4, Folder 1
Buildings 1928-1929
Box 4, Folder 2
Consolidation 1928-1929
Box 4, Folder 3
Correspondence, Apple Orchard Affairs 1928-1929
Box 4, Folder 4
Correspondence, General 1928-1929
Box 4, Folder 5
Kaupp, Dr. B. F. 1928-1929
Box 4, Folder 6
President's Home, Construction of 1928-1929
Box 4, Folder 7
Reports, etc. 1928-1929
Box 4, Folder 8
Trustees 1928-1929
Box 4, Folder 9
Anniversary of the College (40th) 1929-1930
Box 4, Folder 10
Budget 1929-1930
Box 4, Folder 11
Consolidation 1929-1930
Box 4, Folder 12
Correspondence 1929-1930
Box 4, Folder 13
Laundry 1929-1930
Box 4, Folder 14
Military Department 1929-1930
Box 4, Folder 15
Miscellaneous 1929-1930
Box 4, Folder 16
Reports 1929-1930
Box 4, Folder 17
Trustees 1929-1930
Box 4, Folder 18
Budget 1930-1931
Box 5, Folder 1
Correspondence 1930-1931
Box 5, Folder 2
Consolidation 1930-1931
Box 5, Folder 3
Graduate School (Dr. Carl Taylor) 1930-1931
Box 5, Folder 4
Live-at-Home Week 1930-1931
Box 5, Folder 5
Military Department 1930-1931
Box 5, Folder 6
Statistics 1930-1931
Box 5, Folder 7
Trustees 1930-1931
Box 5, Folder 8
Correspondence 1931-1932
Box 5, Folder 9
Consolidation, Correspondence 1931-April 1932
Box 5, Folder 10
Consolidation, Correspondence May 1932-August 1932
Box 5, Folder 11
Consolidation, Reports 1931-1932
Box 5, Folder 12
Forestry Department 1931-1932
Box 5, Folder 13
How Shall Agriculture Survive the Depression (State College Record), vol. 31, no. 5 Apr. 1932
Box 6, Folder 16
Statistics 1931-1932
Box 5, Folder 14
Teaching Load 1931-1932
Box 5, Folder 15
Trustees 1931-1932
Box 5, Folder 16
Agricultural Experiment Station Budget 1932-1933
Box 6, Folder 1
Correspondence 1932-1933
Box 6, Folder 2
Tennessee Valley Authority 1932-1933
Box 6, Folder 3
Textile Foundation 1932-1933
Box 6, Folder 4
Trustees 1932-1933
Box 6, Folder 5
University of North Carolina, Consolidated Correspondence 1932-1933
Box 6, Folder 6
University of North Carolina, Consolidated Reports 1932-1933
Box 6, Folder 7
Correspondence 1933-1934
Box 6, Folder 8
Reports 1933-1934
Box 6, Folder 9
Budget 1933-1934
Box 6, Folder 10
Buildings 1933-1934
Box 6, Folder 11
Forestry Department 1933-1934
Box 6, Folder 12
Miscellaneous 1933-1934
Box 6, Folder 13
Stadium 1933-1934
Box 6, Folder 14
Tennessee Valley Authority 1933-1934
Box 6, Folder 15

Access to the collection

This collection is open for research; access requires at least 48 hours advance notice.

For more information contact us via mail, phone, or our web form.

Mailing address:
Special Collections Research Center
Box 7111
Raleigh, NC, 27695-7111

Phone: (919) 515-2273

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], North Carolina State University, Office of the Chancellor, Early Chancellors Records, UA 002.001.001, Special Collections Research Center, North Carolina State University Libraries, Raleigh, NC

Use of these materials

The nature of the NCSU Libraries' Special Collections means that copyright or other information about restrictions may be difficult or even impossible to determine despite reasonable efforts. The NCSU Libraries claims only physical ownership of most Special Collections materials.

The materials from our collections are made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user must assume full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used for academic research or otherwise should be fully credited with the source.

This collection may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations. Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which North Carolina State University assumes no responsibility.