Explanatory Notes and Factors to Consider

When reviewing the list of journals proposed for cancellation, you will have several data points available to you as you review the list. Below are some tips on understanding what you are seeing and how this data should influence your decisions.


Title

Journal titles listed in the proposed cancellation list represent paid subscriptions. Through consortial partners such as TRLN, the NCSU Libraries has license agreements with several publishers that allow us access to a broader selection of titles (a.k.a. non-subscribed titles) beyond our subscribed list. Typically, after cancelling a subscribed title the Libraries will maintain electronic access to the subscribed years/backfiles of a title. However, if we cancel or decide to not renew a collection of journals, we may lose all access to the additional non-subscribed titles.  In cases where a journal is available as open access, feedback is requested specifically for our paid subscriptions of these journals (which could be for print, print+online, or online only formats). If we were to cancel the paid subscriptions, we would rely on the open access versions of these journals and include them in our catalog and content discovery tools.  However, when considering whether or not to wholly rely on the open access version of a journal, it is important to take into account the sustainability plan of the open access journal, any embargo periods of open access journals ("delayed open access"), as well as the extent to which the journal makes its content open access (e.g., "hybrid open access" or "partial open access").

Call Number

The call numbers listed follow the Library of Congress classification scheme and represent specific elements such as subjects and author/publisher identifiers.

Publisher

The publishers listed are the most current known providers of the journals.

Format

The format can be in one of three configurations: online-only subscription, print-only subscription, and a combination of print + online subscription. The format is often determined by the subscription model, which differs from publisher to publisher. In some instances, the publisher requires that the Libraries subscribe to both the print and electronic versions of a title at a combined cost when the electronic version is not available as a separate subscription. Even when the electronic version can be purchased without the print, there may be little, if any, cost savings. With some publishers, online access comes "free" with a print subscription. Other publishers provide a small savings (usually 5-10%) for online-only access. It should be remembered that the savings from moving to online-only subscriptions and cancelling the print counterpart can only be realized once. While switching to online-only subscriptions eliminates some costs of processing print materials (e.g., receipt and processing, shelving, binding, circulation, stacks maintenance), new costs are created (licensing, cross-resource linking, maintaining and troubleshooting access). In making the decision to subscribe to online-only resources, the Libraries will evaluate whether there is a reliable archiving model such as LOCKSS and/or Portico in place for a title before cancelling the print format.

Downloads

These counts represent the number of Full-Text Article Downloads, as reported by publishers according to COUNTER Codes of Practice. The electronic usage download data is provided for the years 2011, 2012, and 2013. Not all publishers provide electronic usage data, therefore, some titles will have a null value.  It's also important to remember that print-only subscriptions will not have data for "Downloads" - the usage for print-only journal subscriptions will have a null value.

Unit Price

Unit Prices listed reflect the individual subscription cost for a journal and may not reflect the actual cost of a journal when it is part of a package. High cost of a journal should be weighed against importance to the NCSU community and other factors. 

Subject

Each journal is assigned to a broad disciplinary group based on Library of Congress subject designations.

Impact Factor

From the Institute for Scientific Information’s (ISI) Journal Citation Reports database, the journal impact factor is the number of cites in a particular year (e.g., 2012) to articles published in the two preceding years (e.g., 2011 and 2010) divided by the number of published articles in that same time period (2011 and 2010). If a journal is not indexed by ISI, there will be no journal impact factor.

Cited by NCSU authors (most recent 5 full years of available data)

This data shows the total number of citations to journals by NCSU authors summed over 2008-2012. If the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) does not index a title, then there will not be a value in this field. This does not mean that the journal has not been cited, it simply means that this data is not available from ISI. This value could be a good indication of a journal's relevance to subject areas in which NCSU researchers are publishing. This data comes from LJUR (Local Journal Utilization Report) data that is developed by the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI).

Publications by NCSU authors (most recent 5 full years of available data)

This data shows the total number of articles written by NCSU authors summed over over 2008-2012. If the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) does not index a title, then there will not be a value in this field. This does not mean that no NCSU authors have published in a given journal, it simply means that this data is not available from ISI. This data can indicate relative importance of journals in terms of research and publishing activity. It comes from the LJUR (Local Journal Utilization Report) data that is developed by the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI).

Local Journal Utilization Report

The Local Journal Utilization Report (LJUR) is a statistical database listing the frequency with which an institution's researchers publish in journals indexed in Web of Science, and the frequency with which they cite journals and other works (theses, government reports, etc.) in their publications. These frequencies are calculated annually. Each article from approximately 8,500 journals indexed by Web of Science is searched for author affiliation. If any of the authors list North Carolina State University as their address, their article is included in the NCSU LJUR data.

The NCSU Libraries uses the LJUR data to provide an estimate of the importance of research journals to the NCSU community. When listing journals for the serials review, the NCSU Libraries includes the data from the last five available years of the LJUR in two categories: number of publications by NCSU authors and number of citations by NCSU authors. Along with price data and other local holdings, the LJUR data helps the community to assess the importance of specific journals to NCSU research.