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Creativity and Technology Symposium Event Series

NRL News - Tue, 2015-10-13 11:21

Join us this fall for the Creativity and Technology Symposium, or C.A.T.S. for short. Using our feline friends as a theme, we will explore a variety of topics that relate to the ever-expanding and complex work of libraries and academic institutions including: GIS-data enabled location tracking and the implications for privacy rights; the use of social media in research; how new technologies are expanding the possibilities for data gathering; and digital archiving as it relates to common computer usage and pop culture. Plus, we have a few special guests who will be paying a not-to-be-missed visit to the Libraries. All C.A.T.S. events are free and open to the public.


Track Your Cat
Sunday, October 25, 3-4 pm
Cameron Village Regional Library

Cats are mysterious, dangerous and far more unpredictable than one might expect from an animal that is, theoretically, domesticated. Some of the mysteries of cats relate to where they go and what they do; this is especially true of cats that go outdoors. In this program, researchers from NC State and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences will share some of the fascinating findings from their Cat Tracker research program that uses GPS technology to collect data on where cats go, what they eat, and what microbes they bring back to our homes. You will also learn how you and your feline pets can participate in the Cat Tracker program, which gives researchers valuable information about outdoor cats’ movement, diet and health.

Image Macros, Memes, and Viral Content
with Tumblr’s Amanda Brennan
Monday, October 26, 3-4 pm
Auditorium (Hill), D. H. Hill Library

What can memes and other viral phenomena tell us about current events, cultural trends, and the Internet as a historical storytelling platform? Amanda Brennan of Tumblr’s Content and Community team will discuss how beloved and instantly-recognizable memes like LOLCats relate to our online interactions and what they say about us as a society. Brennan is the former librarian-in-residence for Know Your Meme, organizing and cataloging the memes in their collection.

A Life-Changing Cat: Mike Bridavsky and Lil BUB
Monday, October 26, 7-8 pm
Auditorium (Hunt), James B. Hunt Jr. Library

Lil BUB is one of the most famous cats in the world. A true phenomenon, Lil BUB has a documentary and internet and cable specials about her, a book published by Penguin Publishers, and millions upon millions of YouTube, Instagram, and Tumblr views. Lil BUB’s owner Mike Bridavsky is a sound engineer who owns Russian Recording in Bloomington, IN, and formerly worked as a sound archivist for the Indiana University Archives of Traditional Music’s Sound Directions project. Mike leveraged his knowledge of digital archives, his skills gained from years of independent marketing of his own bands and his recording studios, his sense of humor, and his love for cats to unintentionally create a business that is based on and requires a very detailed understanding of social media, archiving, and technology. Hear from Mike and see Lil BUB in person in this special program. Ticket reservations to this program are required. Please reserve your seats here.

As part of this program, the NCSU Libraries will be hosting a pet food drive for Safe Haven Cat Shelter & Clinic. Beginning at 6:00 p.m., volunteers from Safe Haven will be available at the Hunt Library to take your donations of pet food or other supplies on their wish list. Earlier this year, Safe Haven was a recipient of a grant from Lil BUB’s BIG Fund for the ASPCA.

I Know Where Your Cat Lives: How Computers Know Everything
About You (With Information You Provide)

Tuesday, October 27, 3-4 pm
Auditorium (Hill), D. H. Hill Library

I Know Where Your Cat Lives is a data experiment that visualizes a sample of 1 million public pictures of cats on a world map, locating them by the latitude and longitude coordinates embedded in their metadata. The cats were accessed via publicly available APIs provided by popular photo sharing websites. The photos were then run through various clustering algorithms using a supercomputer at Florida State University, and the project was covered by The New York Times, USA Today, MSNBC, and others. Owen Mundy, creator of I Know Where Your Cat Lives, will describe the project and explain some of the implications of decreased online privacy and increased access to your data by startups and international megacorps.

Animals, Technology, and Us:
How the Internet is Affecting Participatory Science
Tuesday, October 27, 7-8pm
Auditorium (Hunt), James B. Hunt Jr. Library

A recent study by the Pew Research Center shows that citizens and scientists often see science-related issues through different sets of eyes. However, by involving our pets as research subjects, and by harnessing the Internet’s amazing power of connectivity, scientists have an unprecedented opportunity to involve everyday people in “citizen science.” Join us for a panel discussion with Dr. Rob Dunn, associate professor of biological sciences at NC State, Amanda Brennan of Tumblr, and Professor Owen Mundy of Florida State about what they are finding in their work.

Using Technology to Measure Pain in Animals
Wednesday, October 28, 7-8pm
South Theater (College of VM), Veterinary Medicine Library
College of Veterinary Medicine

Evaluating pain in animals is no easy task, as they cannot tell us where or how much they are hurting. In this informative session, Dr. Duncan Lascelles, professor of small animal surgery and pain management at the College of Veterinary Medicine at NC State, will discuss his pioneering research using accelerometers (similar to the wearable fitness trackers used by humans) to access information about movement patterns of domestic cats in their home environments. Lascelles will explain how he uses this data to inform his treatment decisions–from diet to medication–to help manage cats’ pain.

This session is geared toward anyone interested in how veterinarians are using leading-edge technologies, as well as pet owners who want to learn more about what researchers are discovering about chronic pain.

NCSU Libraries Makerspace Offers CRDM Graduate Research Assistantship

NRL News - Tue, 2015-10-13 08:38

CHASS PhD students to get experience with emerging maker technologies

This new NCSU Libraries CRDM Graduate Research Assistantship offers graduate students the opportunity to collaborate with skilled information professionals to gain experience providing technology services in an academic setting. The access to spaces and service programs, with an emphasis on emerging technologies, is designed to enhance graduate student education through practical assignments that introduce participants to key issues and practices in educational technology.

Jessica Handloff, the first recipient of the assistantship, is a U.S. Army Captain and comes to NC State most recently from East Carolina University, where she received a Masters in Anthropology.

According to Adam Rogers, Emerging Technology Services Librarian, “Jessica has already established herself as a crucial member of the D.H. Hill Makerspace team. She has enriched the Makerspace with excellently designed learning resources, supported students and faculty in learning the processes and tools of making in innovative ways, and identified great opportunities for collaboration with her CRDM cohort and its faculty. I look forward to her contributions in the coming year and know they will do a lot to establish the Hill Makerspace as a premiere space for critical and creative thinking and making on campus.”

Makerspace
The Libraries opened its first Makerspace in January 2013 with the opening of Hunt Library, making new tools accessible to users at NC State University and taking a leadership role in the growing movement for makerspaces in libraries. The Makerspace program includes 3D printing and laser cutting services, a variety of methods of 3D scanning, electronics prototyping kits to borrow, and a series of workshops and course collaborations that has grown each semester. These efforts have brought the Maker movement into the Libraries and grown its profile on campus by providing access to exciting high-end tools as well as entry-level learning and making experiences to all students, faculty, and staff.

This past June, the D. H. Hill Library opened its Makerspace. A major addition to the Makerspace program, and to the Libraries as a whole, this high-profile location provides ample space for collaborative work and teaching and is well situated to empower more of the NC State community with the creative tools and processes of making. In this space, the Libraries continues to focus on 3D printing and scanning, laser cutting, and electronics prototyping, while adding new tools such as sewing and soldering and emphasizing hands-on access. The NCSU Libraries has a full slate of programming, workshops, presentations, and opportunities for serendipitous making already in the works.

Vet Med Library Reduced Hours Oct 19-24 (CVM Fall Break)

VetMed News - Mon, 2015-10-12 08:00

The Veterinary Medicine Library has reduced hours during the College of Veterinary Medicine’s Fall Break:

  • October 19-23 (Monday – Friday): 7:30am – 6:00pm
  • October 24 (Saturday) : 1:00pm  – 5:00pm
  • October 25 (Sunday) : 11:00am – 10:00pm  (Regular hours resume)

Note the North Carolina State Fair is October 15-25; more info at NC State Fair.

Longer hours are available at the D.H. Hill Library and James B. Hunt Library–see all hours at NCSU Libraries Hours.

NCSU Libraries Announces 2nd Annual Code+Art Student Visualization Contest

NRL News - Fri, 2015-10-09 16:02

The NCSU Libraries is now accepting submissions for the 2016 Code+Art Student Visualization Contest. Graduate and undergraduate students, individually or in groups, who are interested in creative coding, generative art, animation, or data visualization are invited to create visualizations for any of the four large video walls at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library, including the 20-foot wide Art Wall. Students graduating in December 2015 can submit entries and participate as members of competing teams, but are not eligible to win the cash prize.

Participants will compete for cash prizes of $1000, $500, and $250 to be awarded at the Code+Art reception held in April at the Hunt Library. All entries that are technologically viable and appropriate will be displayed on one of four video walls in Hunt Library and viewed by thousands of visitors every month.

Libraries have long been places where people have explored new ways of interacting with information. The video walls at the James B. Jr. Hunt Library were installed to create a dialogue with library visitors and show the work of students and faculty at the university. The NCSU Libraries developed this contest as a way for students to showcase visualizations created for this digital space. These visualizations will greet library visitors and give them a preview of the possibilities that await them inside the Hunt Library.

Judges are looking for attractive visualizations that are created with a computer. Submissions in these categories are strongly encouraged: data visualization / data art, generative art, procedurally generated environments (e.g. game environments), and animated GIFs. Submissions in these categories will also be considered: digital art, new media art, and animation/motion graphics.

Submit here: https://www.lib.ncsu.edu/codeart/submit

Read about the 2015 winners here: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/stories/codeart-different-kind-data-experience

Celebrate National Veterinary Technicians Week (10/11-17)

VetMed News - Fri, 2015-10-09 10:17

The Veterinary Medicine Library honors veterinary technicians and their tremendous contributions to care during National Veterinary Technicians Week. Pets and Vets need Techs! Check out our selection of veterinary technician-focused titles on display during October at the Veterinary Medicine Library.

September 2015 Publications from CVM Authors

VetMed News - Thu, 2015-10-08 07:26

September 2015 Publications from CVM Authors
Take a look at the CVM author publications for September 2015 courtesy of the NCSU Scholarly Publications Repository.
CVM and other NCSU authors are specifically highlighted with their department affiliation and links to their other publications in the repository. To access the full text of any of these articles, click on “Find Text (NCSU Only)” link.
If you have questions or would like information about the repository or NCSU publications, please email libraryvetmed@ncsu.edu or call us at 919-513-6218.

Wolfline bus service changes over NCSU Fall Break 10/7-12

VetMed News - Wed, 2015-10-07 08:32

The Wolfline bus reduces services over the main campus NCSU Fall Break 10/7-12/15.  For more info http://www2.acs.ncsu.edu/trans/wolfline/service-dates.html

  • Wednesday October 7- All Wolfline service ends at 10 p.m. No night service, no weekend service and no WP
  • Thursday & Friday October 8 & 9- Faculty/Staff service only: Routes 6, 7 & 8 no night/ no weekend/ no WP

Rt. 6, Carter Finley every 30 minutes, Rt. 7 Wolflink Shuttle every 30 minutes, and Rt. 8 Southeast Loop every 36 minutes on days classes are not in session, but faculty and staff report to work. All service stops at 6 p.m. on Faculty/Staff days.

  • Sunday October 11- 8 p.m. -12 midnight. Sunday/ Holiday shuttle
  • Monday October 12- All Wolfline Fall service resumes

New Dorton Arena images now available!

Design Library News - Mon, 2015-10-05 16:26

The Special Collections Research Center continues to scan new materials in order to improve access to its rich collections. We are pleased to share some new scans of the Dorton Arena that were taken during its construction. The images are a part of the James L. Brandt Papers, which include materials that belonged to (and were also collected by) NCSU Design graduate James Lewis Brandt. Brandt worked for architect G. Milton Small and retired in 1991. To explore more of our digital resources, click here.

Biological Illustration Coffee & Viz – Dr. Jennifer Landin, Fri, Oct. 23

VetMed News - Tue, 2015-09-29 08:35

When

Friday, October 23, 2015
9:30am – 10:30am

Where

Teaching and Visualization Lab at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library

Event Description

Dr. Jennifer Landin, assistant professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at NC State, is a biologist, illustrator and science educator. She will discuss biological illustration as a form of visualization and the challenges in teaching students to observe, investigate, create and share.

Contact Information Karen Ciccone (919) 515-3513 kacollin@ncsu.edu Admission Information

Free and open to the public.

Other Information

Light refreshments will be available in an adjacent space beginning at 9:15 a.m.

Graphic Design classes visit Special Collections

Design Library News - Tue, 2015-09-22 09:23

Last week was a busy week in Special Collections – two Graphic Design classes, GD 231 and GD 203 (taught by Russell Flinchum and Deb Littlejohn, respectively) reviewed a large selection of books with interesting design components.

GD 231, History of Design for Engineers and Scientists:

Russell Flinchum shared some background on this course:

During July 2015 I had a very special opportunity to spent a month at Drexel University in Philadelphia at a NEH Summer Institute on “The Canon and Beyond: Teaching the History of Modern Design.” With my 26 classmates, I had the chance to visit a number of special collections, including the Hagley Museum and Library, where Dr. Regina Lee Blaszczyk, Leadership Chair in the History of Business and Society at the University of Leeds, took us on an impressive journey on the role of color in 19th century design (her 2012 book, The Color Revolution, is highly recommended). Reggie’s workshop had clued me in to the extensive network of publications focused on color research and standardization and I was able to show my students the Hoechst Company’s impressive volume on Cotton Dyeing as an example of the primary materials that Professor Blaszczyk had worked from.

For the GD 231 class, Special Collections selected volumes on the early applications of electricity, mechanical engineering, supply catalogs, and other books that showed Flinchum’s students what “the state of the art” was over a century ago and how information-rich that environment was.

GD 203, History of Graphic Design:

The students in Littlejohn’s class had a large list of books to select from, such as this perennial favorite by  E. A. Seguy. While studying their books, the students will consider some of these questions, all provided by Dr. Littlejohn:

In the first (subjective) part, think about and write about your experience with the book, such as:

What is my first visual impression of the book?
What is the physical nature of the book? Size, weight, binding, paper
How do I sense the book? Look, touch, smell, hear (don’t taste!)
What about the physical nature of the book interests me?
What is interesting about the design? Typography? images? cover? layout? etc.

In the second (objective) part, research and answer some of these questions (all questions are unlikely to be pertinent to each book, choose wisely):

(everyone must answer this) Why is this book in the collection? Why is it important enough to collect?
What is this book valued for? (may be more than one thing) subject matter, author, design, age, writing, illustrations, printing, previous owners, where produced
Is this book mentioned in books about the history of books and printing? (Z 250 section of the library)
How does this book fit in with history? Printing history, art/design history, history of a discipline, etc.
Is this book an example of something special? a beginning, an end, a particular style, etc.
Is this book part of the development of something?
If there are important individuals involved in the book’s making, who are they?
Is this book connected with any other books in the collection? In a series, by the same author, by the same designer, about the same subject, etc. Does this add to its importance?

We look forward to working with these classes again next year!

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