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Hunt “Photo Journal” in The Independent

Citing its role as “architectural destination” for the Research Triangle community, the INDYweek has published a photo essay on the Hunt Library.

Also featured in the same edition—the Hunt Library’s green roof in an article about “Raleigh’s Green Acres.”

Special Collections Receives MeadWestvaco Research Reports

NRL News - Mon, 2013-12-16 09:24

Loading packaged pulpwood on a crawler arch-loader, West Virginia Experimental Forest, 1948.

The Special Collections Research Center has received a collection of research reports from the MeadWestvaco company, now called MWV Corporation.  These reports  document forestry research at the research centers, laboratories, and experimental forests of MeadWestvaco and its predecessors:  the Mead Paper Company and the West Virginia Pulp and Paper Company (Westvaco).  The collection is comprised of 13 bankers boxes (19.5 linear feet) of reports dating from 1945 to 2007.

Throughout their history, these companies produced paper and packaging products, and they maintained research forests for the development of pulpwood in several eastern and southern states.  The reports in this collection originated from research conducted in Kentucky, North Carolina, Pennsylvania,  South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia.  Of particular note to the NC State community are reports of research conducted by some of the university’s forestry faculty.

More information about the MeadWestvaco Research Reports can be found in the online collection guide.  A more detailed listing of reports exists in most of the boxes in this collection.  To access materials in this collection, please contact the research services staff using the online Special Collections request form.

Preparing pulpwood, NC Farm Forestry Extension, 1930s.

The MeadWestvaco Research Reports join the Center’s growing collection of primary resources on the history of American forestry and foresters.  The Center is the repository of the papers of Carl Schenck, the founder of the first American school of forestry; Bruce Zobel, prominent tree geneticist; Ellis Cowling, forestry and plant pathologist; and others.  Also, historical records from the forestry programs at NC State University and the NC Cooperative Extension Service exist within the University Archives.  Descriptions of the forestry collections exist on the NCSU Libraries’ website.  Researchers may also access some digitized photographs and other documents online at the NCSU Libraries’ History of Forestry and Rare & Unique Digital Collections sites.

[Note on images:  The top image is from Westvaco Experimental Forest Report WR 12, titled "Packaged Pulpwood" that is contained in Carton 12 of the new collection titled MeadWestvaco Research Reports (MC 00496).  The bottom image is from Box 34 of the existing collection titled Agricultural Extension and Research Services Photographs (UA 023.007).]

Critical Issues Program Releases Preliminary Results of “Defining Critical Issues” Survey

NRL News - Wed, 2013-12-04 10:13

The Critical Issues program, part of the American Geosciences
Institute’s (AGI’s) Center for Geoscience Education and Public Understanding,
has just released the preliminary results of the “Defining Critical Issues”
survey which can be accessed from the Critical Issues program website.

The majority of responses to the web-based survey were from geoscientists in the
post-secondary academic sector. The most frequently
mentioned critical issues were climate change, water, energy, environment,
natural hazards, economics, and issues associated with agriculture, food, and
soils. When asked to select the highest priority issues, all cohorts chose
climate change. Those who described themselves as geoscientists, public, or
“other” chose water as the second priority issue, while decision makers
considered human population growth to be the second highest priority.

The aim of the web-based survey is to understand how the decision-making
community, geoscience community, and the public define the term “critical
issue,” as well as which critical issues are of top concern to each community.
The survey is deliberately short, broad, and unstructured in order to capture a
wide range of responses. The survey, which was launched on November 5, 2013,
will officially close on December 31, 2013, and a final report will be published
in January 2014. The Critical Issues program especially seeks additional input
from members of the public and decision-making community. The survey can be
accessed here.

Hunt Library robot named for former presidential press secretary, N&O editor

“In memory of Jonathan Worth Daniels”

Jonathan Worth Daniels

“I was a terrible strain on the library—I did much more reading outside of class than inside.”  So claimed Jonathan Worth Daniels (1902-1981) in an oral history recorded at the University of North Carolina in 1977.

If the statement is a true one—hardly a given to anyone acquainted with Mr. Daniels’ usual wit—it certainly would not be the first time that the treasures in a good university library set a bright person on a great path.  White House press secretary to Presidents Roosevelt and Truman, long-time editor and publisher of The News & Observer, and author of twenty-one novels and books of history and cultural criticism, Jonathan Daniels left a strong legacy of tough-minded, progressive work that any library would be proud to claim.

The Josephus Daniels Charitable Foundation has made that legacy part of the Hunt Library by naming one of the four robots in the bookBot in memory of Jonathan Daniels, who served as president of the Friends of the Library in 1967-68.

Frank Daniels, Jr.—Jonathan Daniels’ nephew, 2012 North Carolinian of the Year, and himself a long-time N&O editor and force in the economic and cultural life of North Carolina—explained the thinking of the Foundation as they chose to honor his uncle:

Our principal thrust is in education, and we primarily give in eastern North Carolina and the Triangle.  I knew we wanted to give to the Hunt Library; my uncle Jonathan was always involved with the libraries at NC State.  And I was fascinated by the bookBot. It’s just the sort of innovative technology that should be strongly associated with our engineering school.

Frank Daniels, Jr. honors his uncle with Hunt Library robot

Citing the boon a great university is to the economy of a community, especially if the school is located in a state capital, Daniels sees the Hunt Library as an especially effective way to raise the profile of the College of Engineering:  “we need to do what needs to be done to accomplish that.”

Asked what his uncle’s response to the library might have been if he had been around for the Hunt Library opening, Frank Daniels, Jr. concluded: “Well, his first reaction to this grand building would have been to make a smart aleck comment to bring folks down to earth. But then he would have had something to say about how the building uplifts Centennial Campus and provides a center for it, how it is almost like the sun with its planets and satellites surrounding it—a point of inspiration.”

Jonathan Worth Daniels was named in honor of his grandfather, Jonathan Worth, North Carolina governor from 1865-1868.  His father, Josephus Daniels, was editor and publisher of the N&O, which he acquired in 1894, as well as Woodrow Wilson’s Secretary of the Navy during World War I and United States Ambassador to Mexico during the Roosevelt administration.

In addition to editing the N&O, serving in a number of positions during the New Deal era, and gaining a national reputation as writer and historian, Jonathan Worth Daniels wrote for Fortune magazine, published a weekly column in The Nation, won a Guggenheim Fellowship, and served on the United Nations Subcommission for the Prevention of Discrimination and the Protection of Minorities.

Hunt Library featured in “Year in Architecture 2013″

Citing the Hunt Library as setting “a new benchmark for access to immersive technologies,” Library Journal features Robot Alley in its 2013 “Year in Architecture” issue.

Sports Medicine and Exercise Science in Video trial

NRL News - Wed, 2013-11-13 11:41

The NCSU Libraries has a trial to Sports Medicine and Exercise Science in Video until December 30. Please take a look and let us know if this product interests you.

Sports Medicine and Exercise Science in Video is the most extensive video collection ever assembled in the areas of fitness and health assessment, disease management, injury treatment, nutrition, medical fitness, sport science, work-site wellness, exercise adherence, and much more. Developed through an exclusive partnership with Healthy Learning, the world’s leading producer of sports medicine videos, the collection features an array of internationally renowned physicians, exercise scientists, certified athletic trainers, physical therapists, registered dieticians, sport psychologists, personal trainers, and health/wellness experts who share information, ideas, and insights on the principles, techniques, and modalities of modern exercise science and sports medicine.

Please send your comments and feedback on this product to Karen Ciccone.

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