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Critical Issues Program Releases Preliminary Results of “Defining Critical Issues” Survey

NRL News - Wed, 2013-12-04 10:13

The Critical Issues program, part of the American Geosciences
Institute’s (AGI’s) Center for Geoscience Education and Public Understanding,
has just released the preliminary results of the “Defining Critical Issues”
survey which can be accessed from the Critical Issues program website.

The majority of responses to the web-based survey were from geoscientists in the
post-secondary academic sector. The most frequently
mentioned critical issues were climate change, water, energy, environment,
natural hazards, economics, and issues associated with agriculture, food, and
soils. When asked to select the highest priority issues, all cohorts chose
climate change. Those who described themselves as geoscientists, public, or
“other” chose water as the second priority issue, while decision makers
considered human population growth to be the second highest priority.

The aim of the web-based survey is to understand how the decision-making
community, geoscience community, and the public define the term “critical
issue,” as well as which critical issues are of top concern to each community.
The survey is deliberately short, broad, and unstructured in order to capture a
wide range of responses. The survey, which was launched on November 5, 2013,
will officially close on December 31, 2013, and a final report will be published
in January 2014. The Critical Issues program especially seeks additional input
from members of the public and decision-making community. The survey can be
accessed here.

Hunt Library robot named for former presidential press secretary, N&O editor

“In memory of Jonathan Worth Daniels”

Jonathan Worth Daniels

“I was a terrible strain on the library—I did much more reading outside of class than inside.”  So claimed Jonathan Worth Daniels (1902-1981) in an oral history recorded at the University of North Carolina in 1977.

If the statement is a true one—hardly a given to anyone acquainted with Mr. Daniels’ usual wit—it certainly would not be the first time that the treasures in a good university library set a bright person on a great path.  White House press secretary to Presidents Roosevelt and Truman, long-time editor and publisher of The News & Observer, and author of twenty-one novels and books of history and cultural criticism, Jonathan Daniels left a strong legacy of tough-minded, progressive work that any library would be proud to claim.

The Josephus Daniels Charitable Foundation has made that legacy part of the Hunt Library by naming one of the four robots in the bookBot in memory of Jonathan Daniels, who served as president of the Friends of the Library in 1967-68.

Frank Daniels, Jr.—Jonathan Daniels’ nephew, 2012 North Carolinian of the Year, and himself a long-time N&O editor and force in the economic and cultural life of North Carolina—explained the thinking of the Foundation as they chose to honor his uncle:

Our principal thrust is in education, and we primarily give in eastern North Carolina and the Triangle.  I knew we wanted to give to the Hunt Library; my uncle Jonathan was always involved with the libraries at NC State.  And I was fascinated by the bookBot. It’s just the sort of innovative technology that should be strongly associated with our engineering school.

Frank Daniels, Jr. honors his uncle with Hunt Library robot

Citing the boon a great university is to the economy of a community, especially if the school is located in a state capital, Daniels sees the Hunt Library as an especially effective way to raise the profile of the College of Engineering:  “we need to do what needs to be done to accomplish that.”

Asked what his uncle’s response to the library might have been if he had been around for the Hunt Library opening, Frank Daniels, Jr. concluded: “Well, his first reaction to this grand building would have been to make a smart aleck comment to bring folks down to earth. But then he would have had something to say about how the building uplifts Centennial Campus and provides a center for it, how it is almost like the sun with its planets and satellites surrounding it—a point of inspiration.”

Jonathan Worth Daniels was named in honor of his grandfather, Jonathan Worth, North Carolina governor from 1865-1868.  His father, Josephus Daniels, was editor and publisher of the N&O, which he acquired in 1894, as well as Woodrow Wilson’s Secretary of the Navy during World War I and United States Ambassador to Mexico during the Roosevelt administration.

In addition to editing the N&O, serving in a number of positions during the New Deal era, and gaining a national reputation as writer and historian, Jonathan Worth Daniels wrote for Fortune magazine, published a weekly column in The Nation, won a Guggenheim Fellowship, and served on the United Nations Subcommission for the Prevention of Discrimination and the Protection of Minorities.

Hunt Library featured in “Year in Architecture 2013″

Citing the Hunt Library as setting “a new benchmark for access to immersive technologies,” Library Journal features Robot Alley in its 2013 “Year in Architecture” issue.

Sports Medicine and Exercise Science in Video trial

NRL News - Wed, 2013-11-13 11:41

The NCSU Libraries has a trial to Sports Medicine and Exercise Science in Video until December 30. Please take a look and let us know if this product interests you.

Sports Medicine and Exercise Science in Video is the most extensive video collection ever assembled in the areas of fitness and health assessment, disease management, injury treatment, nutrition, medical fitness, sport science, work-site wellness, exercise adherence, and much more. Developed through an exclusive partnership with Healthy Learning, the world’s leading producer of sports medicine videos, the collection features an array of internationally renowned physicians, exercise scientists, certified athletic trainers, physical therapists, registered dieticians, sport psychologists, personal trainers, and health/wellness experts who share information, ideas, and insights on the principles, techniques, and modalities of modern exercise science and sports medicine.

Please send your comments and feedback on this product to Karen Ciccone.

Choose Your Own Adventure at Places & Spaces Exhibit

NCSU Libraries News - Tue, 2013-10-15 14:53

Select maps using the iPad

We are happy to announce the opening of the Places & Spaces: Mapping Science exhibit at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library. In collaboration with Indiana University, NCSU Libraries invites you to browse a collection of some of the most important scientific visualizations ever produced. Visitors to the exhibit can use an iPad to choose from 80 powerful examples of knowledge domain mapping, novel location-based cartographies, data visualizations, and science-inspired art works.

The exhibit runs now through October 27th, and is featured in the iPearl Immersion Theater on the second floor of the Hunt Library.

Individually and as a whole, the maps of Places & Spaces allow data to tell fascinating stories which both the scientist and the layperson can understand and appreciate. Inspiration is waiting for you at the Hunt Library!

Writing support for graduate students

NRL News - Mon, 2013-10-14 13:44
The Graduate School and the Graduate Writing Center have new writing services available to graduate students.

Thesis and Dissertation Support Services (TDSS) TDSS is designed to enhance the success of students writing theses and dissertations. It offer a variety of workshops, seminars, and other programming to empower students to finish their degrees. Its focus is on scholarly writing instruction, but some events do cover the entire research process, from the beginning (forming an advisory committee), to the middle (writing a dissertation proposal), to the end (planning for a dissertation defense), and everything in between. For more information, visit the TDSS website: go.ncsu.edu/tdss or email the Director, Dr. Meagan Kittle Autry, at makittle@ncsu.edu.

Graduate Writing Center (GWC) The GWC is now open for all graduate students. They can bring any non-exam related writing at any point in the writing process for a one-on-one consultation with a writing tutor. Students should make appointments online with the GWC’s Google Calendar appointments system, available at: http://tutorial.ncsu.edu/gwc. For more information, email the Director, Dr. Brandy Grabow, at blgrabow@ncsu.edu.

Feed the Pack

NRL News - Thu, 2013-10-10 14:02

The Library’s Community Service Committee is holding an ongoing food drive for Feed the Pack, the NC State food pantry, and we invite you to participate. A donation bin is located in the Natural Resources Library, near the entrance.

The food pantry appreciates all donations, but they do ask that we try to stay away from canned green beans and corn. It’s best to have a large variety of items available in order to better serve our campus community. A list of donation suggestions is below. Donations will be accepted on an ongoing basis.

More information on Feed the Pack can be found here. Feed the Pack Pantry Donation List
*most needed items

  • Snacks (popcorn, granola bars, animal crackers, pudding, etc.)*
  • Cereal*
  • Breakfast items*
  • Condiments*
  • Grains*
  • Pasta*
  • Fruit (can or cup)*
  • Bottled water
  • Soda
  • Juice boxes
  • Canned meals (soup, tuna, ravioli, etc.)
  • Peanut butter
  • Canned vegetables
  • Toothpaste/toothbrush
  • Feminine products
  • Shaving items
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Soap
  • Toilet paper
  • Paper towels

A new non-Java CAS Structure Editor is now available in SciFinder

NRL News - Thu, 2013-10-03 15:22

The SciFinder chemistry database now features a new version of the CAS Structure Editor that does not require a Java plugin. The Java version of the editor is still available and you can easily select your preferred editor.

The non-Java editor is a new option for substance and reaction searching that queries the same SciFinder database. You may notice that some features are missing. Although SciFinder would have preferred to release the editor with all functionality, they released the first available working version to address the pressing needs of some who are still experiencing Java-related issues. For more information on the Non-Java CAS Structure Editor, visit SciFinder System Requirements.

With the latest SciFinder release, you can also:

-Analyze reaction answer sets by reagent to more quickly identify your synthesis of interest
-Quickly view substance and supplier information simultaneously without leaving your commercial sources answer set
-Easily update your account information and access SciPlanner how-to guides

More information regarding SciFinder can be also found on NCSU Library’s website .

Places & Spaces Puts Science on the Map

NCSU Libraries News - Tue, 2013-09-24 10:18

In collaboration with Indiana University, NCSU Libraries invites you to see some of the most inspired scientific visualizations in history. From October 14th through the 27th, the Places & Spaces: Mapping Science exhibit will be featured in the iPearl Immersion Theater at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library. The October event marks a fascinating symbiosis of content and medium, with the visionary maps that make up Places & Spaces providing a perfect complement to the stunning visual experience of the iPearl Immersion Theater.

Now in its ninth year, the Places & Spaces exhibit has traced the evolution of science maps, featuring the most powerful examples of knowledge domain mapping, novel location-based cartographies, data visualizations, and science-inspired art works. Created by leading figures in the natural, physical, and social sciences, scientometrics, visual arts, social and science policymaking, and the humanities, the maps in Places & Spaces allow us to better grasp the abstract contexts, relationships, and dynamism of human systems and collective intelligence. Individually and as a whole, the maps of Places & Spaces allow data to tell stories which both the scientist and the layperson can understand and appreciate.

"History of Science Fiction" by Ward Shelley is one of the maps in the collection.

Over the course of its nine-year existence, these maps have adorned the walls of some of the most prestigious libraries, museums, and universities around the world (see http://www.scimaps.org/exhibitions/ for a complete listing of venues). By presenting the mapping of science in the context of a more traditional exhibit-going experience, Places & Spaces has brought together two cultural locations—the lab and the gallery—that have often been viewed as ideologically and aesthetically remote.

In keeping, however, with the exhibit’s commitment to both tracing science mapping’s past and offering glimpses of its future, Places & Spaces has partnered with North Carolina State University’s innovative Hunt Library and its state-of-the-art iPearl Immersion Theater to offer a new way to experience this important collection. With its 7×16-foot Christie® MicroTiles® digital display, the iPearl Immersion Theater surrounds viewers with larger-than-life maps of science that are visually arresting from afar and amazingly sharp up close. With media outlets like Time magazine, Ploughshares, Architect magazine, and others placing it at the forefront of a renaissance in library design and capabilities, the Hunt Library is the perfect cutting-edge venue to feature the groundbreaking work of Places & Spaces: Mapping Science.

Pinetum 1934-2002 Now Online

NRL News - Mon, 2013-09-16 08:43

The NCSU Libraries now provides online access to the 1934 through 2001-2002 editions of the Pinetum, the student journal of the NC State College of Natural Resources (previously the School of Forestry and College of Forest Resources). Since 1934, the Pinetum has documented student life in the college and provided a forum for administrative messages to students. The early volumes, also available in print in the library, contain valuable documentation of the history of the college, its faculty and students, and student clubs and activities. Beginning with the 2006-2007 edition, the Pinetum has been published through the College of Natural Resources’ website.

The digital editions of the Pinetum are available as part of the NCSU Libraries’ Rare & Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to thousands of images, video and audio recordings, and text documenting NC State history. The university’s student yearbook, the Agromeck, and course catalogs are among the historical materials available through this website.

Special Collections “Show and Tell” event at the Natural Resources Library a success!

NRL News - Mon, 2013-08-26 15:47

On Friday, August 23, more than 40 faculty, students, and staff members enjoyed the Special Collections Research Center (SCRC) “Show and Tell” event at the Natural Resources Library (NRL). The event featured materials from the SCRC that were of special interest to NRL patrons, including highlights from the Bruce J. Zobel Papers, the Carl Alwin Schenck Papers, and selected materials from the university archives. A sample volume from Romeyn B. Hough’s The American Woods 14-volume set from 1888-1910 was especially popular. The book features (very thinly sliced) radial, tangential, and transverse sections of 350 North American woods. The descriptions that accompany the three views cover each tree’s characteristics, growth habits, medicinal properties, and commercial possibilities. In the photograph above (in the lower right corner), the Curator of Collections is holding up one page from this book.

Given the high attendance at this event, another event will in all likelihood be scheduled at NRL for the following semester. To view these collections in person, please schedule an appointment at the SCRC by sending an email to: library_specialcollections@ncsu.edu.

Two New Library Tutorial Videos

NCSU Libraries News - Thu, 2013-08-22 14:46
Two new animation videos are now available on the library website. These videos will help students as they begin the library research process.

Picking Your Topic IS Research (3:10) describes how picking a topic isn’t set in stone from the get-go. You tweak and refine as you do research. It emphasizes the research process. From Idea to Library (2:28) tells the story of how an idea goes from a researcher to publication as an article in a journal and how it becomes discoverable in article databases through the library. We hope it helps students better understand the distinctions between an article, a journal, and a database.

You can find these and other tutorials here: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/tutorials/

Let your librarian know if you have comments or questions about these videos or suggestions for other tutorial topics.

Two New Library Tutorial Videos

NRL News - Thu, 2013-08-22 12:26
Two new animation videos are now available on the library website. These videos will help students as they begin the library research process.

Picking Your Topic IS Research (3:10) describes how picking a topic isn’t set in stone from the get-go. You tweak and refine as you do research. It emphasizes the research process.

From Idea to Library (2:28) tells the story of how an idea goes from a researcher to publication as an article in a journal and how it becomes discoverable in article databases through the library. We hope it helps students better understand the distinctions between an article, a journal, and a database.

You can find these and other tutorials here: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/tutorials/

Let your librarian know if you have comments or questions about these videos or suggestions for other tutorial topics.

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