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Author and Program Lineup for the 2014 NC Literary Festival

Four Pulitzers, a half dozen National Book and National Book Critics Circle awards, the creator of the Goosebumps series, great programs to help young people explore storytelling, and the latest developments in “The Future of Reading”—the 2014 North Carolina Literary Festival is proud to announce the author and program lineup for the April 3-6 gathering at NC State University and at venues throughout Raleigh.

Check out the lineup video!

Over 100 writers and events at the Festival will include:

  • Junot Díaz, recipient of a MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship and author of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, winner of the 2008 Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award
  • Writer, musician, and screenwriter James McBride, author of the landmark memoir The Color of Water and 2013 winner of the National Book Award for The Good Lord Bird
  • Richard Ford, Pulitzer Prize winner and author of The Sportswriter and its sequels, Independence Day and The Lay of the Land
  • Lee Smith, North Carolina’s own winner of the O. Henry Award and the Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters
  • R. L. Stine, the “Stephen King” of children’s fiction
  • A host of activities for children provided by NC State’s College of Education
  • Bookmaking and comics workshops that will have you learning to bind your own book or creating your own biopic comic in less than an hour

A full listing can be found on the NC Literary Festival website.

As it has since 1998, the NC Literary Festival will provide the area’s premier event at which audiences can hear, see, and interact with their favorite writers and artists. In addition to programs on fiction, non-fiction, young adult literature, poetry, and drama, the Festival will allow readers to experience and learn more about how transformative art forms such as graphic novels, comic books, and video games are shaping our literary experiences—and how new technologies such as e-readers and online publishing are changing how we encounter new ways to enjoy storytelling.

The majority of the NC Literary Festival will be held in NC State’s new James B. Hunt Jr. Library.  As the “face of NC State in the 21st century,” this new space has generated international attention for its iconic architecture, its transformative technologies, and its simulation and large-scale visualization spaces that encourage and enable new forms of storytelling. The Hunt Library will serve as the festival’s thematic centerpiece, inspiring conversations about the future of reading and reading-based technologies.

Food trucks, easy parking, tents with activities for children and their parents, and a wide choice of favorite writers will provide a stimulating and fun gathering for all of us who value the future of reading.

The NC Literary Festival is hosted on a rotating basis by the academic libraries at NC State University, Duke University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  The event is free and open to the public.

Laureate sponsors for the 2014 festival include PNC, Our State magazine, the Poe Endowment for Southern Americana, the Friends of the Library of North Carolina State University, and the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources that has administered grant funds from the Institute of Museum and Library Services under the provisions of the federal Library Services and Technology Act.

The 14th most beautiful library in the world

The “Best Value Schools” website has honored the Hunt Library by ranking it as 14th in its listing of the world’s 50 most beautiful libraries:

Oslo-based architectural firm Snohetta made its mark in Raleigh in early 2013 with the opening of North Carolina State University’s James B. Hunt Jr. Library. The designers teamed up with local architects Pearce Brinkley Cease & Lee (now merged with Clark Nexsen) to develop the glimmering wonder, which is arguably as eco-minded as it is attractive. Thirty-one percent of the materials used in the library’s construction are recycled in origin, lighting is natural or solar energy based, and the majority of the timber was taken from sustainable forests. Both the facility’s green features and design have wowed industry insiders, and the striking structure was honored with an American Institute of Architects/American Library Association Library Building Award in 2013.

Hunt “Photo Journal” in The Independent

Citing its role as “architectural destination” for the Research Triangle community, the INDYweek has published a photo essay on the Hunt Library.

Also featured in the same edition—the Hunt Library’s green roof in an article about “Raleigh’s Green Acres.”

Special Collections Receives MeadWestvaco Research Reports

NRL News - Mon, 2013-12-16 09:24

Loading packaged pulpwood on a crawler arch-loader, West Virginia Experimental Forest, 1948.

The Special Collections Research Center has received a collection of research reports from the MeadWestvaco company, now called MWV Corporation.  These reports  document forestry research at the research centers, laboratories, and experimental forests of MeadWestvaco and its predecessors:  the Mead Paper Company and the West Virginia Pulp and Paper Company (Westvaco).  The collection is comprised of 13 bankers boxes (19.5 linear feet) of reports dating from 1945 to 2007.

Throughout their history, these companies produced paper and packaging products, and they maintained research forests for the development of pulpwood in several eastern and southern states.  The reports in this collection originated from research conducted in Kentucky, North Carolina, Pennsylvania,  South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia.  Of particular note to the NC State community are reports of research conducted by some of the university’s forestry faculty.

More information about the MeadWestvaco Research Reports can be found in the online collection guide.  A more detailed listing of reports exists in most of the boxes in this collection.  To access materials in this collection, please contact the research services staff using the online Special Collections request form.

Preparing pulpwood, NC Farm Forestry Extension, 1930s.

The MeadWestvaco Research Reports join the Center’s growing collection of primary resources on the history of American forestry and foresters.  The Center is the repository of the papers of Carl Schenck, the founder of the first American school of forestry; Bruce Zobel, prominent tree geneticist; Ellis Cowling, forestry and plant pathologist; and others.  Also, historical records from the forestry programs at NC State University and the NC Cooperative Extension Service exist within the University Archives.  Descriptions of the forestry collections exist on the NCSU Libraries’ website.  Researchers may also access some digitized photographs and other documents online at the NCSU Libraries’ History of Forestry and Rare & Unique Digital Collections sites.

[Note on images:  The top image is from Westvaco Experimental Forest Report WR 12, titled "Packaged Pulpwood" that is contained in Carton 12 of the new collection titled MeadWestvaco Research Reports (MC 00496).  The bottom image is from Box 34 of the existing collection titled Agricultural Extension and Research Services Photographs (UA 023.007).]

Critical Issues Program Releases Preliminary Results of “Defining Critical Issues” Survey

NRL News - Wed, 2013-12-04 10:13

The Critical Issues program, part of the American Geosciences
Institute’s (AGI’s) Center for Geoscience Education and Public Understanding,
has just released the preliminary results of the “Defining Critical Issues”
survey which can be accessed from the Critical Issues program website.

The majority of responses to the web-based survey were from geoscientists in the
post-secondary academic sector. The most frequently
mentioned critical issues were climate change, water, energy, environment,
natural hazards, economics, and issues associated with agriculture, food, and
soils. When asked to select the highest priority issues, all cohorts chose
climate change. Those who described themselves as geoscientists, public, or
“other” chose water as the second priority issue, while decision makers
considered human population growth to be the second highest priority.

The aim of the web-based survey is to understand how the decision-making
community, geoscience community, and the public define the term “critical
issue,” as well as which critical issues are of top concern to each community.
The survey is deliberately short, broad, and unstructured in order to capture a
wide range of responses. The survey, which was launched on November 5, 2013,
will officially close on December 31, 2013, and a final report will be published
in January 2014. The Critical Issues program especially seeks additional input
from members of the public and decision-making community. The survey can be
accessed here.

Hunt Library robot named for former presidential press secretary, N&O editor

“In memory of Jonathan Worth Daniels”

Jonathan Worth Daniels

“I was a terrible strain on the library—I did much more reading outside of class than inside.”  So claimed Jonathan Worth Daniels (1902-1981) in an oral history recorded at the University of North Carolina in 1977.

If the statement is a true one—hardly a given to anyone acquainted with Mr. Daniels’ usual wit—it certainly would not be the first time that the treasures in a good university library set a bright person on a great path.  White House press secretary to Presidents Roosevelt and Truman, long-time editor and publisher of The News & Observer, and author of twenty-one novels and books of history and cultural criticism, Jonathan Daniels left a strong legacy of tough-minded, progressive work that any library would be proud to claim.

The Josephus Daniels Charitable Foundation has made that legacy part of the Hunt Library by naming one of the four robots in the bookBot in memory of Jonathan Daniels, who served as president of the Friends of the Library in 1967-68.

Frank Daniels, Jr.—Jonathan Daniels’ nephew, 2012 North Carolinian of the Year, and himself a long-time N&O editor and force in the economic and cultural life of North Carolina—explained the thinking of the Foundation as they chose to honor his uncle:

Our principal thrust is in education, and we primarily give in eastern North Carolina and the Triangle.  I knew we wanted to give to the Hunt Library; my uncle Jonathan was always involved with the libraries at NC State.  And I was fascinated by the bookBot. It’s just the sort of innovative technology that should be strongly associated with our engineering school.

Frank Daniels, Jr. honors his uncle with Hunt Library robot

Citing the boon a great university is to the economy of a community, especially if the school is located in a state capital, Daniels sees the Hunt Library as an especially effective way to raise the profile of the College of Engineering:  “we need to do what needs to be done to accomplish that.”

Asked what his uncle’s response to the library might have been if he had been around for the Hunt Library opening, Frank Daniels, Jr. concluded: “Well, his first reaction to this grand building would have been to make a smart aleck comment to bring folks down to earth. But then he would have had something to say about how the building uplifts Centennial Campus and provides a center for it, how it is almost like the sun with its planets and satellites surrounding it—a point of inspiration.”

Jonathan Worth Daniels was named in honor of his grandfather, Jonathan Worth, North Carolina governor from 1865-1868.  His father, Josephus Daniels, was editor and publisher of the N&O, which he acquired in 1894, as well as Woodrow Wilson’s Secretary of the Navy during World War I and United States Ambassador to Mexico during the Roosevelt administration.

In addition to editing the N&O, serving in a number of positions during the New Deal era, and gaining a national reputation as writer and historian, Jonathan Worth Daniels wrote for Fortune magazine, published a weekly column in The Nation, won a Guggenheim Fellowship, and served on the United Nations Subcommission for the Prevention of Discrimination and the Protection of Minorities.

Hunt Library featured in “Year in Architecture 2013″

Citing the Hunt Library as setting “a new benchmark for access to immersive technologies,” Library Journal features Robot Alley in its 2013 “Year in Architecture” issue.

Sports Medicine and Exercise Science in Video trial

NRL News - Wed, 2013-11-13 11:41

The NCSU Libraries has a trial to Sports Medicine and Exercise Science in Video until December 30. Please take a look and let us know if this product interests you.

Sports Medicine and Exercise Science in Video is the most extensive video collection ever assembled in the areas of fitness and health assessment, disease management, injury treatment, nutrition, medical fitness, sport science, work-site wellness, exercise adherence, and much more. Developed through an exclusive partnership with Healthy Learning, the world’s leading producer of sports medicine videos, the collection features an array of internationally renowned physicians, exercise scientists, certified athletic trainers, physical therapists, registered dieticians, sport psychologists, personal trainers, and health/wellness experts who share information, ideas, and insights on the principles, techniques, and modalities of modern exercise science and sports medicine.

Please send your comments and feedback on this product to Karen Ciccone.

Choose Your Own Adventure at Places & Spaces Exhibit

NCSU Libraries News - Tue, 2013-10-15 14:53

Select maps using the iPad

We are happy to announce the opening of the Places & Spaces: Mapping Science exhibit at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library. In collaboration with Indiana University, NCSU Libraries invites you to browse a collection of some of the most important scientific visualizations ever produced. Visitors to the exhibit can use an iPad to choose from 80 powerful examples of knowledge domain mapping, novel location-based cartographies, data visualizations, and science-inspired art works.

The exhibit runs now through October 27th, and is featured in the iPearl Immersion Theater on the second floor of the Hunt Library.

Individually and as a whole, the maps of Places & Spaces allow data to tell fascinating stories which both the scientist and the layperson can understand and appreciate. Inspiration is waiting for you at the Hunt Library!

Writing support for graduate students

NRL News - Mon, 2013-10-14 13:44
The Graduate School and the Graduate Writing Center have new writing services available to graduate students.

Thesis and Dissertation Support Services (TDSS) TDSS is designed to enhance the success of students writing theses and dissertations. It offer a variety of workshops, seminars, and other programming to empower students to finish their degrees. Its focus is on scholarly writing instruction, but some events do cover the entire research process, from the beginning (forming an advisory committee), to the middle (writing a dissertation proposal), to the end (planning for a dissertation defense), and everything in between. For more information, visit the TDSS website: go.ncsu.edu/tdss or email the Director, Dr. Meagan Kittle Autry, at makittle@ncsu.edu.

Graduate Writing Center (GWC) The GWC is now open for all graduate students. They can bring any non-exam related writing at any point in the writing process for a one-on-one consultation with a writing tutor. Students should make appointments online with the GWC’s Google Calendar appointments system, available at: http://tutorial.ncsu.edu/gwc. For more information, email the Director, Dr. Brandy Grabow, at blgrabow@ncsu.edu.

Feed the Pack

NRL News - Thu, 2013-10-10 14:02

The Library’s Community Service Committee is holding an ongoing food drive for Feed the Pack, the NC State food pantry, and we invite you to participate. A donation bin is located in the Natural Resources Library, near the entrance.

The food pantry appreciates all donations, but they do ask that we try to stay away from canned green beans and corn. It’s best to have a large variety of items available in order to better serve our campus community. A list of donation suggestions is below. Donations will be accepted on an ongoing basis.

More information on Feed the Pack can be found here. Feed the Pack Pantry Donation List
*most needed items

  • Snacks (popcorn, granola bars, animal crackers, pudding, etc.)*
  • Cereal*
  • Breakfast items*
  • Condiments*
  • Grains*
  • Pasta*
  • Fruit (can or cup)*
  • Bottled water
  • Soda
  • Juice boxes
  • Canned meals (soup, tuna, ravioli, etc.)
  • Peanut butter
  • Canned vegetables
  • Toothpaste/toothbrush
  • Feminine products
  • Shaving items
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Soap
  • Toilet paper
  • Paper towels

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