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Coffee & Viz

NRL News - Wed, 2015-08-05 14:34

Held in one of the NCSU Libraries high-tech spaces, Coffee & Viz is a forum in which NC State researchers share their visualization work and discuss topics of interest. All Coffee & Viz programs are free and open to the public and are presented by the NCSU Libraries. Coffee and light refreshments will be served at 9:15 a.m., program begins at 9:30 a.m. For more information, contact Karen Ciccone at 919-515-3513 or kacollin@ncsu.edu.

UPCOMING PROGRAMS Dr. Julie Mell (History) and Dr. Helen Burgess (English)

Friday, August 21 at 9:30 a.m.

D.H. Hill Library, Visualization Studio

Dr. Julie Mell and Dr. Helen Burgess will discuss how they have integrated visualization and the Libraries’ high-tech spaces into their teaching practice and how using visualization can help students learn in new ways. This session will be presented twice: at 9:30 a.m. and again at 10:00 a.m. Limited space available, please register at: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/coffee-and-viz/signup. Dr. Ben Watson (Computer Science)

Friday, September 18 at 9:30 a.m.

Hunt Library, Duke Energy Hall

Thanks to technology, visual communication is easier than ever to create and disseminate. Unfortunately, technology hasn’t yet been able to help people communicate effectively — thus the catchphrase “Death by Powerpoint.” Dr. Ben Watson, associate professor of computer science at NC State, will discuss “visualization as persuasion,” using visualization as a tool for communication rather than discovery. Dr. Jennifer Landin (Biological Sciences)

Friday, October 23 at 9:30 a.m.

Hunt Library, Teaching and Visualization Lab

Dr. Jennifer Landin, assistant professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at NC State, is a biologist, illustrator and science educator. She will discuss biological illustration as a form of visualization and the challenges in teaching students to observe, investigate, create and share. Dr. Matthew Booker (History)

Friday, November 20 at 9:30 a.m.

Hunt Library, Creativity Studio

Dr. Matthew Booker, associate professor of history at NC State, will address the question, “What use is spatial visualization to historians?” With Dr. Michael Young in Computer Science, Dr. Booker coordinates the Visual Narrative cluster in the Chancellor’s Faculty Excellence Program. PAST PROGRAMS Dr. Helena Mitasova, Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

Friday, January 23 at 9:15 a.m.

Hunt Library, Teaching & Visualization Lab

Dr. Helena Mitasova is a professor in Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and a faculty fellow at the Center for Geospatial Analytics. She is a charter member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) and a member of Open Source GRASS GIS project steering committee. She will talk about visualizing large geospatial data sets and modeling of dynamic landscape processes.

The presentation will also include examples of open source GRASS GIS visualizations developed by students for their course projects using the Teaching and Visualization Lab and Tangeoms: Tangible geospatial modeling system. Dr. Christopher Healey, Computer Science: Understanding Color for Data Visualization

Friday, February 20 at 9:15 a.m.

Hunt Library, Teaching & Visualization Lab

Dr. Chris Healey’s work harnesses visual perception to create visualization techniques supporting the rapid and effective exploration and analysis of large, complex datasets.

“Colour is a familiar concept that we all recognize and use in our day-to-day lives. Understanding how colour ‘works’ is a much more fascinating problem, however, involving the physics of light, visual perception, language and culture, and context. This talk will touch on these issues by discussing them and demonstrating how they affect presenting data with colour. As a practical example, I will show how we used colour to visualize results from the recent 2014 U.S. elections.” Dr. Gary Lackmann, Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

Friday, March 20 at 9:15 a.m.

Hunt Library, Teaching & Visualization Lab

Dr. Gary Lackmann is an atmospheric scientist at NC State who studies high-impact weather, climate change, and numerical atmospheric modeling. He will present visualizations that clarify the structure and workings of hurricanes, using Hurricane Katrina as an example. Professor David Hill, Architecture

Friday, April 17 at 9:15 a.m.

Hunt Library, Teaching & Visualization Lab

The Great Fire of London destroyed St. Paul’s Cathedral in 1666. Nearly four centuries later, Professors John N. Wall (English) and David Hill (Architecture) have rebuilt it—in virtual space. Wall, a John Donne scholar, wanted to hear the famed poet and dean of the cathedral deliver one of his most famous sermons in order to experience the event “unfolding in real time in the context of an interactive and collaborative occasion.”

The Virtual Paul’s Cross Project (VPCP) uses architectural modeling software and digital acoustic simulations to recreate the visual, spatial, and auditory experience of Donne’s Gunpowder Day sermon delivered on November 5th, 1622. At this Coffee & Viz lecture, Prof. Hill will present the research and modeling process that created the virtual environment of London’s pre-fire St. Paul’s Cathedral.  He will discuss how digital tools can simulate momentous events in spaces that have not existed for hundreds of years.

Changes to library access to limit disruptions around final exams

NRL News - Tue, 2015-07-28 12:36

NC State students rely on the Libraries for quiet study space, particularly during final exams. To help ensure that we can meet this need, the NCSU Libraries is continuing changes put in place this summer to reduce disruptions during the critical times around finals.

At the Hunt Library

  • Access during reading days and finals will be limited to NC State students, faculty, and staff, who will need to use their Wolfpack One Cards to enter the Hunt Library security gates, July 29 & July 30.
  • No tours, sightseeing, or events will be allowed between the last day of classes and the completion of final exams.

NC State to Host Fourth Annual Designing Libraries for the 21st Century Conference

Design Library News - Thu, 2015-07-09 15:01

Raleigh, NC – The NCSU Libraries is pleased to announce that registration is now open for the Fourth Annual Designing Libraries for the 21st Century conference, which will be held at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library in Raleigh, NC on September 20-22, 2015. The University of Calgary and the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) are co-sponsors of this event.

Librarians, architects, planners, designers, information technologists, and others will gather to discuss the challenges and achievements of designing libraries and learning centers for the 21st century. Sessions will feature an array of topics including creating and communicating a vision; developing innovative, technology-rich learning and research spaces; creating Makerspaces; planning staff workspaces; and addressing organizational and service models, including transforming the collaborative roles of librarians in these new research and discovery environments. We will include examples from renovated libraries as well as new buildings. In-depth tours of the James B. Hunt Jr. Library and the D. H. Hill Library will be offered.

An optional preconference will be held on September 20, 2015. The theme of the preconference is “21st Century Libraries: Why Do They Matter?” and it will include sessions on infrastructure, spaces, partnerships, and re-education of librarians to support the life cycle of research and teaching.

For more information, please visit the conference website at go.ncsu.edu/designinglibraries.

NC State to Host Fourth Annual Designing Libraries for the 21st Century Conference

NRL News - Wed, 2015-07-08 15:20

The NCSU Libraries is pleased to announce that registration is now open for the Fourth Annual Designing Libraries for the 21st Century conference, which will be held at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library in Raleigh, NC on September 20-22, 2015. The University of Calgary and the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) are co-sponsors of this event.

Librarians, architects, planners, designers, information technologists, and others will gather to discuss the challenges and achievements of designing libraries and learning centers for the 21st century. Sessions will feature an array of topics including creating and communicating a vision; developing innovative, technology-rich learning and research spaces; creating Makerspaces; planning staff workspaces; and addressing organizational and service models, including transforming the collaborative roles of librarians in these new research and discovery environments. We will include examples from renovated libraries as well as new buildings. In-depth tours of the James B. Hunt Jr. Library and the D. H. Hill Library will be offered.

An optional preconference will be held on September 20, 2015. The theme of the preconference is “21st Century Libraries: Why Do They Matter?” and it will include sessions on infrastructure, spaces, partnerships, and re-education of librarians to support the life cycle of research and teaching.

For more information, please visit the conference website at go.ncsu.edu/designinglibraries.

NCSU Libraries to Receive Phil Freelon’s Architectural Papers

Design Library News - Fri, 2015-06-26 10:38

Because the College of Design played such a critical role in his early development as an architect, Phil Freelon has chosen the NCSU Libraries as the home for his architectural archive: “I am proud to be a member of the NC State family,” Freelon noted, “and it is an honor to be recognized in this way.” Freelon has donated  his architectural records from his earliest years as a practitioner and plans to add to his archive in the future.

In addition to being a student in the College of Design in the 70’s, Freelon has taught at the College, served on its Design Guild/Design Life Board, the Board of Visitors, and the Board of Trustees. He has designed several buildings on campus, including the Partners III Lab Building on Centennial Campus and the new Gregg Museum addition, currently under construction.

Freelon is the founder and President of The Freelon Group, Inc.  His work has been published in national professional journals including Architecture, Progressive Architecture, Architectural Record, and Contract Magazine, where he was named Designer of the Year for 2008.

Metropolis and Metropolitan Home magazines and the New York Times have also featured Freelon and his firm.  His furniture design has been recognized nationally,  including first prize in the PPG Furniture Design Competition and design contract work with Herman Miller.

A native of Philadelphia, PA, Freelon earned his Bachelor of Environmental Design degree in Architecture from North Carolina State University and his Master of Architecture degree from MIT.  He then received a Loeb Fellowship and spent a year of independent study at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design.

Freelon went on to serve as an adjunct faculty member at North Carolina State University’s College of Design and has been a visiting critic/lecturer at Harvard, MIT, the University of Maryland, Syracuse University, Auburn University, the University of Utah, the California College of the Arts, Kent State University and the New Jersey Institute of Technology, among others.  He is currently on the faculty at MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning.

Freelon is a Peer Professional for the GSA’s Design Excellence Program and has served on numerous design award juries, including the National AIA Institute Honor Awards jury and the National Endowment for the Arts Design Stewardship Panel. He is also a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, a LEED Accredited Professional, and the 2009 recipient of the AIA Thomas Jefferson Award for Public Architecture.

Appointed in 2011 by President Barack Obama to the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts, Freelon is part of the team leading the design for the Smithsonian’s new National Museum of African American History and Culture and is a preeminent architectural designer of museums featuring African-American history, including the Center for Civil & Human Rights in Atlanta and the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco.

NCSU Libraries to Receive Phil Freelon’s Architectural Papers

NRL News - Thu, 2015-06-25 12:02

Because the College of Design played such a critical role in his early development as an architect, Phil Freelon has chosen the NCSU Libraries as the home for his architectural archive: “I am proud to be a member of the NC State family,” Freelon noted, “and it is an honor to be recognized in this way.” Freelon has donated  his architectural records from his earliest years as a practitioner and plans to add to his archive in the future.

In addition to being a student in the College of Design in the 70’s, Freelon has taught at the College, served on its Design Guild/Design Life Board, the Board of Visitors, and the Board of Trustees. He has designed several buildings on campus, including the Partners III Lab Building on Centennial Campus and the new Gregg Museum addition, currently under construction.

Freelon is the founder and President of The Freelon Group, Inc.  His work has been published in national professional journals including Architecture, Progressive Architecture, Architectural Record, and Contract Magazine, where he was named Designer of the Year for 2008.

Metropolis and Metropolitan Home magazines and the New York Times have also featured Freelon and his firm.  His furniture design has been recognized nationally,  including first prize in the PPG Furniture Design Competition and design contract work with Herman Miller.

A native of Philadelphia, PA, Freelon earned his Bachelor of Environmental Design degree in Architecture from North Carolina State University and his Master of Architecture degree from MIT.  He then received a Loeb Fellowship and spent a year of independent study at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design.  Freelon went on to serve as an adjunct faculty member at North Carolina State University’s College of Design and has been a visiting critic/lecturer at Harvard, MIT, the University of Maryland, Syracuse University, Auburn University, the University of Utah, the California College of the Arts, Kent State University and the New Jersey Institute of Technology, among others.  He is currently on the faculty at MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning.

Freelon is a Peer Professional for the GSA’s Design Excellence Program and has served on numerous design award juries, including the National AIA Institute Honor Awards jury and the National Endowment for the Arts Design Stewardship Panel. He is also a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, a LEED Accredited Professional, and the 2009 recipient of the AIA Thomas Jefferson Award for Public Architecture.

Appointed in 2011 by President Barack Obama to the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts, Freelon is part of the team leading the design for the Smithsonian’s new National Museum of African American History and Culture and is a preeminent architectural designer of museums featuring African-American history, including the Center for Civil & Human Rights in Atlanta and the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco.

Large Design Drawings: Special Handling Required

Design Library News - Mon, 2015-06-22 10:19

Arcade Building for E. W. Grove by Charles N. Parker, Architect, Asheville, N.C., 15 July 1926

Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Design is a significant collecting area for the Special Collections Research Center, as well as an area of excellence at the university and a corresponding strength within the NCSU Libraries’ overall collection. Including papers, drawings, and records of prominent architects, landscape architects, and greenways planners in North Carolina and the southeastern United States, with an emphasis on major modernists, as well as collections documenting the historic architecture of North Carolina, industrial design and graphic design, these collections contain much material that is large or fragile or beautiful or all of the above. Thus, they require special arrangements for storage and transportation.

The beauty of architectural collections is often hidden when they first arrive. If the architect stopped practicing or the firm went out of business years before we receive the collection, then the material may have been stored in less than ideal conditions and may no longer be organized as it was when it was regularly used.

To preserve architectural drawings, we store them either rolled or flat in acid-free enclosures. Rolled drawings are rolled on acid-free cores and wrapped in acid-free paper. Flat drawings are stored in acid-free folders in metal flat files with baked epoxy finishes.

Storage for rolled drawings.

Flat storage for architectural drawings.

Because of their size, we need special equipment to transport architectural drawings. To move either rolled or flat drawings within one building, we use this cart with a top constructed for us by our Building Services Department:

Cart for moving architectural drawings.

To move drawings from our off-site storage facility to our Reading Room in the main library in order for users to see them, we use a variety of cases, including these:

Case to transport rolled drawings.

Cases to transport flat drawings.

For information about our collections in the areas of Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Design, please consult our website.

The Founding of the Farm at Black Mountain College

NRL News - Thu, 2015-06-18 09:33

Students working on the Black Mountain College farm

The farm at Black Mountain College was a remarkable achievement. Student-initiated and largely student-led, the farm was conceived in fall 1933, debated throughout winter, and launched in spring 1934. Building on his well-received program at the Hunt Library last summer, David Silver, visiting scholar at the NCSU Libraries, is back to discuss the origins of the farm at Black Mountain College and share his recent research that dispels some often-held misconceptions about both the farm and the College itself.

Using the Hunt Library’s high resolution visualization spaces as well as materials from the NCSU Libraries Special Collections Research Center, Silver will bring never-before-seen photographs and his electric presentation style to this interactive discussion of the genesis of the most significant art college in America’s history. Silver is an associate professor of media studies, environmental studies, and urban agriculture at the University of San Francisco.

There will be two presentations on Tuesday June 30, 2015: one at 10:30am and one at 7pm. Both presentations begin on the Commons Wall stairs between levels 3 and 4. Following the program, attendees are invited to join Professor Silver for refreshments and discussion in the Hunt Library’s Collaboration Hub (Level 5).

Free and open to the public. Presented by the NCSU Libraries. For more information contact Mike Nutt at mrnutt@ncsu.edu. For information about directions and parking, visit lib.ncsu.edu/parking.

The Founding of the Farm at Black Mountain College

Students working on the Black Mountain College farm

The farm at Black Mountain College was a remarkable achievement. Student-initiated and largely student-led, the farm was conceived in fall 1933, debated throughout winter, and launched in spring 1934. Building on his well-received program at the Hunt Library last summer, David Silver, visiting scholar at the NCSU Libraries, is back to discuss the origins of the farm at Black Mountain College and share his recent research that dispels some often-held misconceptions about both the farm and the College itself.

Using the Hunt Library’s high resolution visualization spaces as well as materials from the NCSU Libraries Special Collections Research Center, Silver will bring never-before-seen photographs and his electric presentation style to this interactive discussion of the genesis of the most significant art college in America’s history. Silver is an associate professor of media studies, environmental studies, and urban agriculture at the University of San Francisco.

There will be two presentations on Tuesday June 30, 2015: one at 10:30am and one at 7pm. Both presentations begin in the Teaching and Visualization Lab on Level 4. Following the program, attendees are invited to join Professor Silver for refreshments and discussion in the Hunt Library’s Collaboration Hub (Level 5).

Free and open to the public. Presented by the NCSU Libraries. For more information contact Mike Nutt at mrnutt@ncsu.edu. For information about directions and parking, visit lib.ncsu.edu/parking.

NCSU Libraries Launches New Makerspace

NRL News - Tue, 2015-06-16 10:47

As part of President Obama’s National Week of Making, the NCSU Libraries is opening their
Makerspace in D. H. Hill Library on Tuesday,
June 16.

The Makerspace will offer a hands-on, do-it-yourself space where users are encouraged to experiment and learn new hardware and software skills. It will be equipped with 3D printers, a laser cutter, electronics prototyping tools, sewing machines, and general tools for making, and will be accessible to all NC State students, faculty, and staff.

While typically available for open use, faculty integrating maker tools into their curriculum will
be able to reserve the Makerspace for classes, and the Libraries will use the space to hold
workshops featuring particular tools and techniques.

The Libraries hopes the D. H. Hill Makerspace will serve as a hub for making on campus—a place to expose the NC State community to making and its corresponding emerging literacies. To compliment their expertise with maker tools and techniques, the NCSU Libraries staff has expertise in disciplinary research, industry and market research, patent searching and filing, digital product development, data management, all of which can enrich a maker’s approach. The Libraries is committed to bringing critical thinking to the maker experience and technology literacy.

With the D. H. Hill Makerspace, the Libraries
have added yet another innovative learning space and equipped it with an extensive set of maker
technologies: MakerBot and LulzBot 3D
printers; Arduino, Galileo, and Raspberry Pi
electronics prototyping platforms; Bernina
sewing machines; an Epilog laser cutter, and
an electronics workstation with Hakko
soldering iron. The space also offers a
“tinkering table” for drop-in users, featuring
hands-on making tools like LittleBits,
3Doodlers, LEGOS, and MaKey MaKeys.
These interactive experiences will help stir
users’ creative thinking and get them making
on their first visit.

NCSU Libraries Launches New Makerspace

Design Library News - Tue, 2015-06-16 10:47

As part of President Obama’s National Week of Making, the NCSU Libraries is opening their Makerspace in D. H. Hill Library on Tuesday, June 16.

The Makerspace will offer a hands-on, do-it-yourself space where users are encouraged to experiment and learn new hardware and software skills. It will be equipped with 3D printers, a laser cutter, electronics prototyping tools, sewing machines, and general tools for making, and will be accessible to all NC State students, faculty, and staff.

While typically available for open use, faculty integrating maker tools into their curriculum will be able to reserve the Makerspace for classes, and the Libraries will use the space to hold workshops featuring particular tools and techniques.

The Libraries hopes the D. H. Hill Makerspace will serve as a hub for making on campus—a place to expose the NC State community to making and its corresponding emerging literacies. To compliment their expertise with maker tools and techniques, the NCSU Libraries staff has expertise in disciplinary research, industry and market research, patent searching and filing, digital product development, data management, all of which can enrich a maker’s approach. The Libraries is committed to bringing critical thinking to the maker experience and technology literacy.

With the D. H. Hill Makerspace, the Libraries have added yet another innovative learning space and equipped it with an extensive set of maker technologies: MakerBot and LulzBot 3D printers; Arduino, Galileo, and Raspberry Pi electronics prototyping platforms; Bernina sewing machines; an Epilog laser cutter, and an electronics workstation with Hakko soldering iron. The space also offers a “tinkering table” for drop-in users, featuring hands-on making tools like LittleBits, 3Doodlers, LEGOS, and MaKey MaKeys. These interactive experiences will help stir users’ creative thinking and get them making on their first visit.

NCSU Libraries Goes to Washington for First Capitol Maker Faire

NRL News - Thu, 2015-06-11 10:59

NCSU Libraries’ own Adam Rogers and Dan Hawkins are traveling to Washington, D.C. today to participate in the first Capitol Hill Maker Faire, which is being held at the Rayburn House Office Building. The Faire is open to the public, members of Congress, and congressional staff. Rogers and Hawkins are scheduled to meet with Congressman David Price of North Carolina later today.

The Capitol Hill Maker Faire kicks off a nationwide celebration of making, and is being held in conjunction with the much larger National Maker Faire at the University of DC, on June 12–13. It will be followed by the White House National Week of Making, June 12–18. As part of the National Week of Making, NCSU Libraries will be opening their own Makerspace in D.H. Hill Library on Tuesday, June 16.

Hosted by the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) in collaboration with the Congressional Maker Caucus, Maker Media, and Nation of Makers, the faire will explore the new movement driven by hobbyists, tinkerers, crafters, and innovators that is breathing new life and innovation into American manufacturing. The movement is also changing the face of informal learning at community institutions with learning that is inherently experimental, inventive, creative, and project-based.

The Capitol Hill Maker Faire is free and open to the public. It runs from 5:00 pm to 8:00 pm and will feature approximately 30 exhibitors with hands-on displays, such as robots, crafts, 3D printers, and other new manufacturing tools. The faire will be preceded by a series of panel discussions, from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm, with leaders of the Maker movement discussing its impact on the economy, education, and community development.

For details, go to www.imls.gov/maker.

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