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The Farm at Black Mountain College: A Hunt Library Happening

Join David Silver, Visiting Scholar at the NCSU Libraries, for a multimedia happening that chronicles the rise and fall of Black Mountain College, founded in 1933 near Asheville, North Carolina. There will be two performances on Monday, August 4. The morning performance will start at 10:30 a.m. and conclude at noon. The evening performance will start at 7 p.m. and conclude at 8:30 p.m. Both performances will start at the Hunt Library iPearl Immersion Theater.

Education practitioners can still learn from what worked and what didn’t work at Black Mountain College, especially here at NC State where several of the College’s principles are still at work. Focusing on the Black Mountain College farm and work program, Silver will lead an exploration of the College’s lesser-known but vitally important participants. David Silver is associate professor of media studies, environmental studies, and urban agriculture at University of San Francisco.

Using the entire Hunt Library as a storytelling building and featuring never-before-seen photographs, this dynamic event will examine the most experimental college in American history. Silver will employ an unconventional storytelling approach that unfolds as participants walk through the building.

Free and open to the public. Presented by the NCSU Libraries. For more information contact Mike Nutt at mrnutt@ncsu.edu.

The Farm at Black Mountain College: A Hunt Library Happening

NCSU Libraries News - Mon, 2014-07-28 08:54

Join David Silver, Visiting Scholar at the NCSU Libraries, for a multimedia happening that chronicles the rise and fall of Black Mountain College, founded in 1933 near Asheville, North Carolina. There will be two performances on Monday, August 4. The morning performance will start at 10:30 a.m. and conclude at noon. The evening performance will start at 7 p.m. and conclude at 8:30 p.m. Both performances will start at the Hunt Library iPearl Immersion Theater.

Education practitioners can still learn from what worked and what didn’t work at Black Mountain College, especially here at NC State where several of the College’s principles are still at work. Focusing on the Black Mountain College farm and work program, Silver will lead an exploration of the College’s lesser-known but vitally important participants. David Silver is associate professor of media studies, environmental studies, and urban agriculture at University of San Francisco.

Using the entire Hunt Library as a storytelling building and featuring never-before-seen photographs, this dynamic event will examine the most experimental college in American history. Silver will employ an unconventional storytelling approach that unfolds as participants walk through the building.

Free and open to the public. Presented by the NCSU Libraries. For more information contact Mike Nutt at mrnutt@ncsu.edu.

Wall Street Journal: Hunt Library helps inspire New York Public Library renovation

Citing the need for inspiring “collaborative spaces, stocked with tools for creative projects,” the New York Public Library looks to the Hunt Library for the planned renovation of its landmark Fifth Avenue building.

Civets and Tarsiers and Tapirs (oh my!)

NRL News - Tue, 2014-06-03 13:11

This post is contributed by Ashley Williams, Project Archivist, Animal Rights and Animal Welfare Collections.

Included in the Animal Welfare Institute Records is a collection of photographs by Ernest P. Walker. When I first encountered the photographs I was amazed by the sheer variety of animals photographed. There are pictures of lions, tigers, and bears (oh my!), but also several animals I had never heard of or did not know what they looked like: civets, lemmings, tapirs, and tarsiers (also known as bush babies), to name a few. I was intrigued to learn about these animals and curious as to the images I would come across. The collection did not disappoint.

Civet

Given the number and quality of the photographs, I realized this collection was likely not created by an average animal-loving person. My thoughts turned to “who in the world is Ernest P. Walker and why did he take all of these pictures?” I was quickly able to learn more about him: he worked as a warden and inspector for the United States Bureau of Fisheries in Alaska in the 1910s upon graduating from college. After a three year stint as a game warden in Arizona and California, Walker returned to Alaska in 1921 with the United States Biological Survey as a fur and game warden and executive officer for the Alaska Game Commission. In 1927, Walker moved to Washington, DC and assumed the role of assistant director of the National Zoological Park in 1930, where he remained until 1956.

Lemming

Walker was more concerned with mammals as living animals rather than their individual biological components. Over the years, he observed their feeding habits, care of young, and other behavioral characteristics and began taking photographic portraits of many species. To observe certain small mammals more closely than his duties at the zoo would allow, he brought them into his home as pets. Most of the photographs date from his term as assistant director.

Tarsier

Upon retiring from the National Zoo, Walker, along with his qualified assistants, compiled data, prepared photographs, and arranged a manuscript into what would become the three-volume Mammals of the World. Two of his other works are Walker’s Bats of the World and Walker’s Primates of the World, all of which are available at the NCSU Libraries. Information about the animals’ breeding, habitats, food, and physical description, along with a photograph or illustration, is included for all but four animals. Additionally, Walker wrote two books for the Animal Welfare Institute: First Aid and Care of Small Mammals and Studying Small Mammals.

South American Tapir

To learn more about Ernest Walker’s photographs, or about the Animal Welfare Institute Records, be sure to check out the collection guide.

The Hunt Library honored for public relations and interior design

The James B. Hunt Jr. Library at North Carolina State University has been recognized with two of the library profession’s most prestigious honors: a 2014 John Cotton Dana Library Public Relations Award and a 2014 ALA/IIDA Library Interior Design Award.

Sponsored by EBSCO, the H.W. Wilson Foundation, and the Library Leadership and Management Association (LLAMA), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), the John Cotton Dana Library Public Relations Award has been given annually since 1946 to celebrate excellence in library public relations. The communications to open the Hunt Library were recognized for creating “a bold, new campaign that helped the community imagine ‘The Library of the Future.’”  “The true star of this campaign,” the award concluded, “was the way the community told the story. Students were asked to imagine themselves in the space, and they took to the challenge wholeheartedly.”

Sponsored by the International Interior Design Association and the ALA, the Library Interior Design Award honors “excellence in aesthetics, design, creativity, function, and satisfaction of the client’s objectives.”  The Hunt Library was recognized as winner of the “Academic Libraries, Over 30,000 sq. ft.” category.  The Hunt Library’s lead designer was Snøhetta; its executive architects were Clark Nexsen; and Another Inside Job consulted on interior design.  Gwendolyn Emery—the NCSU Libraries’ Director of Library Environments—as well as other library staff, also played a significant role in envisioning and creating the interior of the building.

“Our intent with the interior design of the Hunt Library was to create inspiring spaces that would encourage inspiring work,” says Susan K. Nutter, Vice Provost and Director of the NCSU Libraries. “We, in turn, have been inspired by just how much our students and faculty appreciate this building, and we are grateful that the IIDA and ALA have honored us for the interior design that is so much a part of this building’s appeal.”

“We are also proud and delighted,” she concludes, “that the communications about the Hunt Library have been able to further ongoing and fruitful discussions about the future of academic libraries, the centers of the learning and research that make universities so productive for our communities.”

Among other awards and prizes, the Hunt Library has also been recently honored with the 2014 Stanford Prize for Innovation in Research Libraries (SPIRL).

“What will become of the Library?”: the Hunt Library in Slate.com

Concluding that “the high-tech future of libraries might lie in buildings like the Hunt,” Slate.com uses NC State’s second main library to explore the range of challenges and options for libraries “as the world goes digital.”

Hunt Library wins “Most Modern Architecture”

In honor of National Library Week, libraries across the country competed in the “Your Beautiful Library Photo Contest,” a contest designed to showcase some of the most amazing libraries in the United States. Thanks to everyone who voted, we’re thrilled that the Hunt Library won the “Most Modern Architecture” category, featuring the very photogenic bookBot! To see all the winners and learn more about the contest, visit: http://solutions.cengage.com/beautifullibrary/

Hunt in “16 Coolest College Libraries”

Business Insider has included the Hunt Library in “The 16 Coolest College Libraries in the Country,” an article on how libraries inspire students with “both traditional and modern marvels.”

“Many of these buildings are iconic structures on their campuses, and have housed generations of studying students,” the article concludes. “Others were built more recently, and show how technology can shape the future of education.”

News & Observer–”the future is already here at NC Literary Festival

Observing that “the future of literature was the theme of this year’s North Carolina Literary Festival,” the News and Observer concludes “that future seemed already here, with attendees using the free festival app to navigate the main venue, N.C. State University’s futuristic Hunt Library” while the program of writers allowed “future, present literary lights [to] shine.”

The Hunt Library featured in new “Cool Spaces!” PBS series

The Rain Garden Reading Room. © Jeff Goldbery/Esto

The James B. Hunt Jr. Library will be profiled this month in the nationally syndicated PBS series, Cool Spaces!, a new prime-time program that promises to “profile some of this century’s most exciting architecture in the U.S.”

Sponsored by the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and Bluebeam Software and hosted by Boston architect and educator Stephen Chung, the new series focuses “on presenting cutting-edge, contemporary public buildings and spaces and the daring architects who push the boundaries of design and materials.”

Cool Spaces! is scheduled to appear on over 100 public television stations across the country, with coverage in about 95% of households with televisions.

The hour-long episode that features the Hunt Library focuses on three libraries that have been dramatic additions to the cultural lives of their communities.  The Hunt Library shares the stage with the Seattle Central Library—listed by the AIA as one of American’s favorite 150 buildings—and the South Mountain Community Library, celebrated for a bold design that encourages interaction between students and local residents.

Featured in almost 300 media pieces since its opening in January 2013, the Hunt Library has gained an international reputation as “the library of the future” for its immersive technologies and for inspiring learning and teaching spaces that encourage collaboration and cross-disciplinary research. The library’s lead designer, Snøhetta, is known for its work on the National September 11 Memorial and Museum pavilion, the new look for Times Square in New York City, and the Golden State Warriors complex on the San Francisco waterfront.  In 2012, Architecture Magazine ranked executive architects Pearce Brinkley Cease + Lee (now Clark Nexsen) as the15th best firm in the United States.

UNC-TV will make the Hunt Library episode available to its viewers on Thursday, April 10, at 9 p.m. and at multiple other times on that date.  A listing of schedules for PBS stations nationwide can be found on the Cool Spaces! website.

The companion book to Cool Spaces!—also featuring the Hunt Library—can be preordered online from the publisher’s website or from Barnes & Noble.  The book will be available in Barnes & Noble bookstores starting in mid April.

The Hunt Library wins prestigious Stanford Prize

Hunt Library Teaching and Visualization Lab. ©Jeff Goldberg/Esto

Cited for “the creative and bold vision that went into designing an innovative model for a research library as a high-technology research platform,” the James B. Hunt Jr. Library at North Carolina State University has been awarded the prestigious 2014 Stanford Prize for Innovation in Research Libraries (SPIRL).

Judged by an international panel of library and academic leaders, SPIRL was established by the Stanford Libraries in 2013 “to single out for community attention and to celebrate functionally significant results of the innovative impulses in research libraries worldwide.”

“Our vision was to give NC State a signature library that would help us recruit the very best students and the very best faculty and to serve the community as an inspiring place of excellence and passion and ideas and vision,” says Susan K. Nutter, Vice Provost and Director of Libraries at NC State. “We could not be more honored that our vision and hard work have been awarded the Stanford Prize.”

Schedule and mobile app now available for the 2014 NC Literary Festival

To make it easy for you to plan in advance to see your favorites among the over 100 authors, performers, and programs available April 3-6, the daily schedule for the 2014 North Carolina Literary Festival is now available, both online and on the Festival’s free app, which you can download to your mobile device from m.guidebook.com.

The choices could be difficult, with winners of four Pulitzers, a half dozen National Book and National Book Critics Circle awards, many of your favorite North Carolina authors, the creator of the Goosebumps series, the author of The Jane Austen Book Club, and great programs for children in the Festival lineup.

Highlights include:

Thursday, April 3
  • Lev Grossman, book critic for Time magazine and author of Warp, Codex (an international bestseller), The Magicians (a New York Times bestseller) and The Magician King (also a Times bestseller).
  • Literary trivia at the Cameron Bar and Grill.
Friday, April 4
  • Junot Díaz, recipient of a MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship and author of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, winner of the 2008 Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award.
  • Bourbon tastings, Irish lit and drink specials, the Monti storytelling contest, and The Morning After band in venues in downtown Raleigh.
Saturday, April 5
  • Writer, musician, and screenwriter James McBride, author of the landmark memoir The Color of Water and 2013 winner of the National Book Award.
  • R. L. Stine, the Stephen King of children’s fiction, as well as Paul Muldoon, Karen Joy Fowler, and William T. Vollmann.
  • North Carolina authors Jill McCorkle, Ben Fountain, and Daniel Wallace.
  • Panels on the future of storytelling, poetry, forensics, African-American women’s voices, and first novels.
  • A host of activities for children and parents.
  • Workshops on bookmaking, pop-up books, comics, and making electronic music.
Sunday, April 6
  • Richard Ford, Pulitzer Prize winner and author of The Sportswriter and its sequels, Independence Day and The Lay of the Land.
  • North Carolina authors Lee Smith, Wiley Cash, Elizabeth Spencer, Allan Gurganus, and the NC Literary Hall of Fame and the Lee Smith Award.
  • Additional events for children and young adults, including The Story Squad and Poetry Out Loud

The majority of the NC Literary Festival will be held in and around NC State’s new James B. Hunt Jr. Library.  As the “face of NC State in the 21st century,” this new space has generated international attention for its iconic architecture, its transformative technologies, and its simulation and large-scale visualization spaces that encourage and enable new forms of storytelling. The Hunt Library will serve as the centerpiece for the NC Literary Festival’s theme, “The Future of Reading.”

The NC Literary Festival is hosted on a rotating basis by the academic libraries at NC State University, Duke University, and the University of North Carolina.  The event is free and open to the public.

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Laureate sponsors for the 2014 festival include PNC, Our State magazine, The Friends of the Library of North Carolina State University, and the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources that has administered grant funds from the Institute of Museum and Library Services under the provisions of the federal Library Services and Technology Act.

“Just do something awesome”—Hunt Library in “Our State” magazine

“N.C. State asked for a library that, at its core, in its every facet, reached out to serve its students. That’s what it got,” concludes Our State magazine in a feature article about the Hunt Library.

Providing feedback for Libraries’ collections and journals review

NRL News - Tue, 2014-02-25 13:07

The Libraries needs your help in preparing for Fiscal Year 2014/2015 cuts to the collections budget of approximately $750,000. The list of potential journal cancellations is available for review at https://www.lib.ncsu.edu/collections/collectionsreview2014.

The site provides instructions on how to rank journals and submit your feedback by the deadline of March 21, 2014. There is also an FAQ available that addresses a number of potential questions about the review, including the Libraries’ commitment to document delivery for canceled titles and the timeline for the overall process.

Under the guidance of the University Library Committee (ULC), and in consultation with the NC State community, the NCSU Libraries is preparing for reductions to the FY 2014/2015 collections budget. Cuts to the Library budget this year and continued price increases for journals and databases above standard inflation rates require a review of current collecting to identify up to $750,000 in potential cuts. This review will include reductions to the book budget and a comprehensive review of all journal and database subscriptions.

Your participation is critical in making the best possible decisions during this difficult period. As evidenced by the over 11 million uses of the collection over the past year, the collection is essential to research and teaching. We appreciate your guidance and collaboration.

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