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Coffee & Viz

Introducing the Coffee & Viz seminar series. Held in one of the NCSU Libraries high-tech spaces, Coffee & Viz is a forum in which NC State researchers share their visualization work and discuss topics of interest. All Coffee & Viz programs are free and open to the public and are presented by the NCSU Libraries. Coffee and light refreshments will be served at 9:15 a.m., program begins at 9:30 a.m. For more information, contact Karen Ciccone at 919-515-3513 or kacollin@ncsu.edu.

UPCOMING PROGRAMS Dr. Helena Mitasova, Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

Friday, January 23 at 9:15 a.m.

Hunt Library, Teaching & Visualization Lab

Dr. Helena Mitasova is a professor in Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and a faculty fellow at the Center for Geospatial Analytics. She is a charter member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) and a member of Open Source GRASS GIS project steering committee. She will talk about visualizing large geospatial data sets and modeling of dynamic landscape processes.

The presentation will also include examples of open source GRASS GIS visualizations developed by students for their course projects using the Teaching and Visualization Lab and Tangeoms: Tangible geospatial modeling system. Dr. Christopher Healey, Computer Science: Understanding Color for Data Visualization

Friday, February 20 at 9:15 a.m.

Hunt Library, Teaching & Visualization Lab

Dr. Chris Healy’s work harnesses visual perception to create visualization techniques supporting the rapid and effective exploration and analysis of large, complex datasets.

“Colour is a familiar concept that we all recognize and use in our day-to-day lives. Understanding how colour ‘works’ is a much more fascinating problem, however, involving the physics of light, visual perception, language and culture, and context. This talk will touch on these issues by discussing them and demonstrating how they affect presenting data with colour. As a practical example, I will show how we used colour to visualize results from the recent 2014 U.S. elections.” Dr. Gary Lackmann, Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

Friday, March 20 at 9:15 a.m.

Hunt Library, Teaching & Visualization Lab

Dr. Gary Lackmann is an atmospheric scientist at NC State who studies high-impact weather, climate change, and numerical atmospheric modeling. He will present visualizations that clarify the structure and workings of hurricanes, using Hurricane Katrina as an example. David Hill, Architecture

Friday, April 17 at 9:15 a.m.

Hunt Library, Teaching & Visualization Lab

The Great Fire of London destroyed St. Paul’s Cathedral in 1666. Nearly four centuries later, Professors John N. Wall (English) and David Hill (Architecture) have rebuilt it—in virtual space. Wall, a John Donne scholar, wanted to hear the famed poet and dean of the cathedral deliver one of his most famous sermons in order to experience the event “unfolding in real time in the context of an interactive and collaborative occasion.”

The Virtual Paul’s Cross Project (VPCP) uses architectural modeling software and digital acoustic simulations to recreate the visual, spatial, and auditory experience of Donne’s Gunpowder Day sermon delivered on November 5th, 1622. At this Coffee & Viz lecture, Prof. Hill will present the research and modeling process that created the virtual environment of London’s pre-fire St. Paul’s Cathedral.  He will discuss how digital tools can simulate momentous events in spaces that have not existed for hundreds of years.

Coffee & Viz

NCSU Libraries News - Wed, 2015-01-07 14:34

Introducing the Coffee & Viz seminar series. Held in one of the NCSU Libraries high-tech spaces, Coffee & Viz is a forum in which NC State researchers share their visualization work and discuss topics of interest. All Coffee & Viz programs are free and open to the public and are presented by the NCSU Libraries. Coffee and light refreshments will be served at 9:15 a.m., program begins at 9:30 a.m. For more information, contact Karen Ciccone at 919-515-3513 or kacollin@ncsu.edu.

UPCOMING PROGRAMS Helena Mitasova, Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

Friday, January 23 at 9:15 a.m.

Hunt Library, Teaching & Visualization Lab

Helena Mitasova is a faculty member in Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and a faculty fellow at the Center for Geospatial Analytics. She is a charter member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) and a member of Open Source GRASS GIS project steering committee. She will talk about visualizing large geospatial data sets and modeling of dynamic landscape processes.

The presentation will also include examples of open source GRASS GIS visualizations developed by students for their course projects using the Teaching and Visualization Laboratory and Tangeoms: Tangible geospatial modeling system. Christopher Healey, Computer Science: Understanding Color for Data Visualization

Friday, February 20 at 9:15 a.m.

Hunt Library, Teaching & Visualization Lab

Chris Healy’s work harnesses visual perception to create visualization techniques supporting the rapid and effective exploration and analysis of large, complex datasets.

“Colour is a familiar concept that we all recognize and use in our day-to-day lives. Understanding how colour ‘works’ is a much more fascinating problem, however, involving the physics of light, visual perception, language and culture, and context. This talk will touch on these issues by discussing them and demonstrating how they affect presenting data with colour. As a practical example, I will show how we used colour to visualize results from the recent 2014 U.S. elections.” Gary Lackmann, Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

Friday, March 20 at 9:15 a.m.

Hunt Library, Teaching & Visualization Lab

Gary Lackmann is an atmospheric scientist at NC State who studies high-impact weather, climate change, and numerical atmospheric modeling. He will present visualizations that clarify the structure and workings of hurricanes, using Hurricane Katrina as an example. David Hill, College of Design

Friday, April 17 at 9:15 a.m.

Hunt Library, Teaching & Visualization Lab

David Hill was responsible for building the 3D architecture models for the Virtual Paul’s Cross project, and will discuss the process of rendering a historic site for modern audiences.

December 2014 Publications from CVM Authors

VetMed News - Wed, 2015-01-07 14:32

December 2014 Publications from CVM Authors

Take a look at the CVM author publications for December 2014 courtesy of the NCSU Scholarly Publications Repository.

CVM and other NCSU authors are specifically highlighted with their department affiliation and links to their other publications in the repository. To access the full text of any of these articles, click on “Find Text (NCSU Only)” link.

If you have questions or would like information about the repository or NCSU publications, please email libraryvetmed@ncsu.edu or call us at 919-513-6218.

Rocky Mount Contracting Firm D. J. Rose & Son Inc. Donates Unique Historic Records to NCSU Libraries

NCSU Libraries News - Tue, 2014-12-16 08:32

The contracting firm D. J. Rose and Son Inc., based in Rocky Mount, North Carolina, has donated a major collection of historic architectural drawings and other documents to the North Carolina State University Libraries. Established in 1890 by builder David Jeptha Rose, D. J. Rose and Son is the oldest continuously operating general contracting firm in North Carolina.

D. J. Rose and Son 1940 addition to Rocky Mount Mills as plant gears up to become a major supplier of cotton to the US Army during World War II.

Towering tobacco and textile mills, tall and elegant banks, classical courthouses in county seats, railroad stations large and small, electric power plants and fertilizer factories, hospitals and churches, and commercial buildings and residences in every style—for more than a century the Rose family firm constructed essential buildings of every kind throughout Eastern North Carolina and as far away as Florida and Maryland. Year by year, each generation of the firm filed away the records of their projects in nearly every town in the region.

The donors of the collection, Dillon Rose, Sr., and Dillon Rose, Jr., discovered the significance of the records after exploring NCSU Libraries’ website, North Carolina Architects and Builders at http://ncarchitects.lib.ncsu.edu/. Dillon Rose Jr. saw the biography for architect William P. Rose (David Jeptha Rose’s brother) and contacted the library to ask if the D. J. Rose firm was to be included in the website. Catherine W. Bishir, Curator of Architecture at the Special Collections Research Center at NCSU Libraries, learned from him about the family collection. Rose recalls, “I didn’t realize the importance of what we had until I talked with Catherine.”

To ensure the collection’s long-term preservation and access to researchers, the Roses agreed to donate the collection to the Libraries. The NCSU Libraries secured a matching grant from the Marion Stedman Covington Foundation of Greensboro, North Carolina, to enable the records—many of them more than 100 years old—to be cleaned by a conservation contractor.

The hundreds of rolls of drawings include works by some of the region’s leading architects for whom most records have been lost—Benton and Benton of Wilson, John C. Stout of Rocky Mount, Joseph Leitner of Wilmington, to name a few. Rows of boxes hold thousands of documents that tell the story of changing times and the work of many people, from local workmen asking for jobs to bills from distant suppliers of hardware and machinery. “It is a rich and amazing collection,” says Bishir. “We’ve seen just part of it, and can’t wait to see the rest of its treasures.”

Much of the collection involves railroad facilities—depots, turntables, platforms—especially those for the present Atlantic Coast Line (ACL), the lifeline of the region’s economic development. The company’s location by the railroad linked it to projects near and far, including the rail-oriented warehouses and factories where hundreds of workers sold or processed the region’s principal crops of cotton and tobacco.

As Gwyneth Thayer, Associate Head and Curator of Special Collections, who orchestrated the cleaning project, states, “Thanks to the Rose family and the Covington Foundation, historians and the interested public for years to come can learn about transportation and industrial history as well as architecture in ways that would never have been possible otherwise.”

The Special Collections Research Center (SCRC) at the NCSU Libraries continues to assemble and archive the work of leading architects and builders to make these unique materials available to a wide audience. The SCRC has collected the papers of key architects, including G. Milton Small, Jr., George Matsumoto, and William Waldo Dodge, as well as those of past and present faculty members of NC State’s College of Design such as Henry Kamphoefner, Marvin Malecha, Matthew Nowicki, and Frank Harmon.

The SCRC holds research and primary resource materials in areas that reflect and support the teaching and research needs of the students, faculty, and researchers at the university. By emphasizing established and emerging areas of excellence at NC State University and corresponding strengths within the Libraries’ overall collection, the SCRC develops collections strategically with the aim of becoming an indispensable source of information for generations of scholars.

New in October and November

Design Library News - Mon, 2014-12-15 12:28

GB652.D47 2014  Design in the Terrain of Water

HT166.C75 2014  Critical Spaces : contemporary perspectives in urban spatial and landscape studies

HT166.U64 2014  Uneven Growth : tactical urbanisms for expanding megacities

HT169 .G7 T977 2013  Jaqueline Tyrwhitt : a transnational life in urban planning and design

HT178.H56 S53 2014  Himalayan Cities : settlement patterns, public spaces and architecture

NA100.A72 2014  Architecture and the Welfare State

NA208.I45 2012  Igloo : contemporary vernacular architecture

NA687.R33 2014  Building as Ornament

NA737.F48 R37 2014  California Moderne  and the Mid-Century Dream : the architecture of Edward H. Fickett

NA737.H25 K56 2014  George Hadfield : architect of the Federal City

NA737.S654 D83 2014  Stiff + Trevillion : practicing architecture

NA737.W7 F743 2014  Frank Lloyd Wright : the rooms : interiors and decorative arts

NA755.C37 2013 v.1-2  Architecture in Mexico : 1900-2010

NA803.C664 2014  Havana Modern

NA970.W35 2013  London Buildings : David Walker Architects

NA1053.C66 A4 2014  Concrete UnLtd.

NA1088.M65 K76 2014  Mies van der Rohe : the built work

NA1121.R66 K35 2014  The Third Rome : 1922-1943: the making of the Fascist capital

NA1153.H38 I24 2014  Havermans + Hielkema : architecten

NA1173.V36 A4 2014  Charles Vandenhove : architecture 1954-2014

NA1223.J83 H36 2014  Finn Juhl and His House

NA1455.F53 S24435 2014  Saarinen Houses

NA2005.A69 2014  Architecture LIVE Projects : pedagogy into practice

NA2500.A7125 2014  Architecture Against the Post-Political

NA2500.F667 2014  Forty Ways To Think About Architecture : architectural history and theory today

NA2500.P55 2014  Place and Displacement : exhibiting architecture

NA2500.S473 2014  Towards an Articulated Phenomenological Interpretation of Architecture

NA2542.3.P37713x 2014  Passive House Design

NA2542.36.L47 2014  Lessons from Vernacular Architecture

NA2543.T43 S53 2013  Rise Tectonic Machines! Construct the Exigent City!

NA2545.A1 B69 2014  Doing Disability Differently

NA2707.T73 A4 2014  Bernard Tschumi : notations : diagrams and sequences

NA3705.D87 2015  Architectural Tiles : conservation and restoration

NA4232.M48 C37 2014  Spectacular Mexico : design, propaganda, and the 1968 Olympics

NA4475.S8 G673 2014  Gunnar Asplund’s Gothenburg : the transformation of public architecture in Interwar Europe

NA5320.M2 H46 2014  Cathedral : an illness and healing

NA6011.L35 2014  The Golden Lands : Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand & Vietnam

NA6600.C69 205  University Trends : contemporary campus design

NA6696.C6 J33 2014  New Museums in China

NA9051.R69 2014  Urban Intensities : contemporary housing types and territories

NA9355.E3 M33 2014  Scotland’s Shrine : the Scottish National War Memorial

NC242.P37 A4 2014  In the City

NC363.M37 2014  Art-Centered Learning Across the Curriculum

NC845.D33 2014  Graphic Design School : the principles and practice of graphic design

NC997.M35 2014  Making a Splash : graphics that flow

NC1002.P33 E28 2014  Eat & Go : branding & design for takeaways & restaurants

NC1766.U53 B45 2014  The Art of Big Hero 6

NC1766.U53 B66 2014  Art of the Book of Life

NC1766.U53 H692 2014  The Art of How To Train Your Dragon 2

NK1170.K84 2014  Designing Models

NK1175.H63 2014  When Design Really Works

NK1447.6.C73 A4 2014  A Frame For Life : the designs of StudioIlse

NK1510.H444 2014  Typographic Universe

NK2043.P68 2014  Bachelors of a Different Sort : queer aesthetics, material culture, and the modern interior in Britain

NK2195.S89 S792 2014 v.1-2  Stylish Stores II

NK2542.E73 BL47 2014  Ercol : furniture in the making

NK2542.W75 A4 2014  The Furniture of Rupert Williamson

NK7390.A1 S59 2014  Place and Adornment : a history of contemporary jewellery in Australia and New Zealand

PN1992.77.A2596 M395 2014  Adventure Time : the art of Ooo

PN1997.2.B68 E76 2014  The Art of Boxtrolls

PN1997.2.F35 2013  The Hobbit : desolation of Smaug : chronicles : art & design

PN3365.L35 2014  Shoot Your Novel : cinematic techniques to supercharge your writing

PN6727.B36 C64 2005   One Hundred Demons

PN6727.B37 57 Z46 2007  Fun Home : a family tragicomic

PN6727.C565 A6 2012  Daniel Clowes : modern cartoonist

SB484.C2 R45 2014  Climber’s Paradise : making Canada’s mountain parks, 1906-1974

TA403.D46 2014  Material Innovation Architecture

TH880.I56 2014 v.1-2  Innovation and Application of Green Building Materials

TH1431.D34 2012 Icehotel Art & Design

TH1651.A43 2013  The Alchemy of Galvanizing : art, architecture and engineering

TT496.B35 2014  The Fight for Ethical Fashion : the origins and interactions of the clean clothes campaign

TT505.E53 A25 2014  Lanvin : I love you

TT507.F6325 2014  Why It Does Not Have To Fit : modern fashion explained

TT515.F37 2014  Haute Couture Ateliers : the artisans of fashion

Z116.A43 S38 2014  Book Designers from the Netherlands

Late Night Study Break

NCSU Libraries News - Thu, 2014-12-04 12:14

Coffee and donuts during final exams
(Starting the night of December 7th)
D. H. Hill Library and the Hunt Library

Long after the cafes have closed for the night, University Dining will be providing free coffee and the Friends of the Library will be supplying donuts in the lobbies of the D. H. Hill Library and the Hunt Library throughout final examinations (except for Saturday and Sunday mornings).

So put down the books for a few moments, take a deep breath or two, and meet us after midnight to throw off the stress and boost up the energy.

Our thanks go to University Dining and the Friends of the Library.

Changes to library access to limit disruptions around final exams

NCSU Libraries News - Tue, 2014-11-25 16:22

NC State students rely on the Libraries for quiet study space, particularly during final exams. To help ensure that we can meet this need, the NCSU Libraries is continuing changes put in place this summer to reduce disruptions during the critical times around finals.

At the Hunt Library

  • Access during reading days and finals will be limited to NC State students, faculty, and staff, who will need to use their Wolfpack One Cards to enter the Hunt Library security gates, December 4-16.
  • No tours, sightseeing, or events will be allowed between the last day of classes and the completion of final exams.

At the D. H. Hill Library

  • Tours and events will be limited around final exams, December 4-16
  • The Wolfpack One Card will continue to be required for access after 10:00 pm.

Don’t Just Read . . .

NCSU Libraries News - Wed, 2014-11-19 14:09

Looking for an opportunity to discuss the latest popular books with some of the smartest people around (your friends and North Carolina State University’s most engaged scholars)? NCSU Libraries and Wake County Public Libraries teamed up to make that easy with READ SMART, a series of informal discussions moderated by members of NC State’s faculty. READ SMART is free and open to the public and is sponsored by Friends of the Library of North Carolina State University. All discussions are held at the Cameron Village Regional Library, 1930 Clark Avenue, Raleigh, NC 27605. For more information, please call 919-513-3481. Read Smart will be taking a summer vacation in June and July but join us in August for our next program. Upcoming programs:

Thursday, August 21 at 7:00 p.m. Join us for a book discussion of the bestseller Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt by Michael Lewis. Moderated by Dr. Eileen Taylor, CPA, CFE, associate professor of accounting at NC State. About the book: Four years after his #1 bestseller The Big Short, Michael Lewis returns to Wall Street to report on a high-tech predator stalking the equity markets. Thursday, September 11 at 7:00 p.m. Join us for a book discussion of Cooked, the newest bestseller by Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma. Moderated by Dr. Keith Harris, assistant professor of Food, Bioprocessing & Nutrition Sciences at NC State. About the book: The more we watch food on television, the less food we actually prepare and cook. Michael Pollan’s new book is a clarion-call for the virtues and values of proper cooking – an essential, defining human activity which sits at the heart of our cultures, shapes family life and is in itself hugely enjoyable. Thursday, October 23 at 7:00 p.m. Join us for a book discussion of The Maid’s Version, a short novel by Daniel Woodrell, author of Winter’s Bone. Moderated by Dr.Marc K. Dudley, associate professor of English at NC State. About the book:

In 1929, an explosion at a dance hall in a Missouri town killed 42 people. Who was to blame? Alma Dunahew, whose scandalous younger sister was among the dead, believes she knows the answer – and that its roots lie in a dangerous love affair. But no one will listen to a woman from the wrong side of the tracks. It is only decades later that her grandson listens to her account and unearths the sorry truth. “Exquisite . . . a pleasure to read.” The New York Times

Donor Spotlight: Dr. Ricky and Kim Bloomfield

NCSU Libraries News - Wed, 2014-11-19 12:51

At 17, Dr. Ricky Bloomfield (’04) had pretty definite plans to attend a prestigious local private university. NC State only made it on his list as “backup school.” Until he visited.

The Park Scholarship he was offered was a significant draw, but it was really the sense of excitement and what he calls “the immersion in innovation” that he experienced on his brief trip to campus that set the direction for the rest of his life.

The Bloomfield family, Ricky and Kim,
with daughters Catherine and Miriam.

Just listing Ricky’s undergraduate majors and minors gives you some sense of what he cherished at NC State. There are four—Chemistry, Secondary Education, Saxophone Performance, and Spanish. He’s not one to be put in a box.

That ability to range wide and deep across disciplines led quickly not only to a medical degree, but to the successful iOS apps company he began while still in medical school. Soon he was engrossed in figuring out new ways that mobile applications could help transform the medical field, letting him, as he explains, “combine my passion taking care of patients one at a time with helping out patients millions at a time with medical technology.” Dr. Bloomfield is currently Director, Mobile Technology Strategy for Duke Health Technology Solutions, as well as Assistant Professor in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics at Duke University.

Ricky’s wife, Kim Bloomfield (‘02 in Chemistry and Textile Chemistry), first learned about the Hunt Library on a tour while she was president of the Park Scholars Alumni Society, back when the building was still under construction. “I got excited about it,” she says with some understatement, given the couple’s ongoing passionate support of the new space. “Knowing how much Ricky loves technology and how much I loved studying up in the stacks at D. H. Hill, it was something we became interested in supporting.”

“We are highly into education—and we have kids and want them to be excited about learning. It was a way that I could see getting my own children excited about NC State. And I was sure that the new iconic library would be a benefit to recruiting for the Park Scholarships.” Their two daughters, Ricky explains, will no doubt be NC State, Class of 2028.

“When the Hunt Library was announced, packed full of technology—which is no surprise given NC State’s talents, areas of focus, and research—it really intrigued me,” Ricky continues. “We found out more about it and felt it was something we wanted to get behind.” Right after the building opened, they decided to sponsor and name a student workstation on the building’s 4th floor.

Ricky explains their motivation: “we both went through the Park Scholars program, feel very fortunate in what we were given, and feel an obligation to give back to an institution that has given us so much. We want to see NC State continue to succeed, and the Hunt Library will serve as a rallying point for showcasing talent and innovation. For recruiting, there’s nothing better than taking prospective students to Hunt to show them what NC State can do and hint at the things that they themselves will do once they are here in proximity to all this innovation and technology. Giving back to something that will only make NC State stronger is a no-brainer.”

Their message to young graduates is especially clear. Laughing that they are probably “skewing the age profile of NC State donors down a little,” Kim explains that “we subscribe to the idea that what you spend your money on shows what you believe in. When we began giving to NC State, it wasn’t large amounts—Ricky was still in med school. Recent graduates are sometimes intimidated by hearing about endowed faculty positions or big gifts. But smaller donations made regularly can make a big difference, and they’re more feasible for younger alumni. Our own gifts are not huge, and they did stretch our budget to begin with. But we realized that we can make a huge difference even if we can’t yet endow a chair or name a wing in the library. If recent graduates start from a younger age, this can really make a difference for decades before they enter their golden years.”

As for their investment in the Hunt Library, both have been back many times since the space opened and both are happy, according to Ricky, that it is “living up to its promise as a space where you can let your creativity flow and combine the technologies in ways that are novel and interesting.”

Like their own lives, “things are just getting started. The best is most certainly yet to come.”

First 70 years of the Technician now online

NCSU Libraries News - Tue, 2014-11-18 14:53

As part of our mandate to preserve the history of North Carolina State University and distribute that history widely to scholars, alumni, and the public, the NCSU Libraries has made the first 70 years of the Technician, the university’s student newspaper, available online in a format that is easy to browse and search.

Since it began publishing on February 2, 1920, the Technician has been the school’s most powerful way for students to tell their own stories, to give their perspective on the issues of the times, to influence the direction of the university and the community, and—quite often—to tweak the nose of authority.

The 4000 issues from 1920 through 1990 that are digitized and indexed in the NCSU Libraries’ online collection open a valuable window for historians, social scientists, and others who study the history of NC State and the attitudes and accomplishments of this important slice of our population. They will also be a delight for NC State graduates, staff, and faculty who can now go online and relive their own times at the university—silly fashions, fads, serious issues, and all.

Visitors to vintage Technician issues can, for instance, explore a 1920 sketch of the proposed Bell Tower, enjoy a story on the doubling of the bleacher capacity in October 1921—“that glorious day in football history when N. C. State College will match her strength and skill against the aggregation from the University” at Chapel Hill—or see how the NC State community reacted to the 1970 killings at Kent State University as the Vietnam war divided a campus proud of its long-standing tradition of patriotism and support for the military.

Visits to the campus by John F. Kennedy (1960) and Ronald Reagan (1985) show the range of political interests and views on campus over time, and the yearly April Fools issues establish an enduring heritage of enthusiastic, irreverent, and impolitic student satire and humor.

The online issues of the Technician join a range of other online resources on NC State University history that are available through the NCSU Libraries’ Historical State, Rare & Unique Digital Collections, and Student Leadership websites.

Future plans call for adding issues from the years after 1990 to the Technician collection. To learn how to support this initiative or others from the NCSU Libraries, please visit www.lib.ncsu.edu/giving.

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