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Late Night Study Break

NCSU Libraries News - Thu, 2014-12-04 12:14

Coffee and donuts during final exams
(Starting the night of December 7th)
D. H. Hill Library and the Hunt Library

Long after the cafes have closed for the night, University Dining will be providing free coffee and the Friends of the Library will be supplying donuts in the lobbies of the D. H. Hill Library and the Hunt Library throughout final examinations (except for Saturday and Sunday mornings).

So put down the books for a few moments, take a deep breath or two, and meet us after midnight to throw off the stress and boost up the energy.

Our thanks go to University Dining and the Friends of the Library.

Changes to library access to limit disruptions around final exams

NCSU Libraries News - Tue, 2014-11-25 16:22

NC State students rely on the Libraries for quiet study space, particularly during final exams. To help ensure that we can meet this need, the NCSU Libraries is continuing changes put in place this summer to reduce disruptions during the critical times around finals.

At the Hunt Library

  • Access during reading days and finals will be limited to NC State students, faculty, and staff, who will need to use their Wolfpack One Cards to enter the Hunt Library security gates, December 4-16.
  • No tours, sightseeing, or events will be allowed between the last day of classes and the completion of final exams.

At the D. H. Hill Library

  • Tours and events will be limited around final exams, December 4-16
  • The Wolfpack One Card will continue to be required for access after 10:00 pm.

Don’t Just Read . . .

NCSU Libraries News - Wed, 2014-11-19 14:09

Looking for an opportunity to discuss the latest popular books with some of the smartest people around (your friends and North Carolina State University’s most engaged scholars)? NCSU Libraries and Wake County Public Libraries teamed up to make that easy with READ SMART, a series of informal discussions moderated by members of NC State’s faculty. READ SMART is free and open to the public and is sponsored by Friends of the Library of North Carolina State University. All discussions are held at the Cameron Village Regional Library, 1930 Clark Avenue, Raleigh, NC 27605. For more information, please call 919-513-3481. Read Smart will be taking a summer vacation in June and July but join us in August for our next program. Upcoming programs:

Thursday, August 21 at 7:00 p.m. Join us for a book discussion of the bestseller Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt by Michael Lewis. Moderated by Dr. Eileen Taylor, CPA, CFE, associate professor of accounting at NC State. About the book: Four years after his #1 bestseller The Big Short, Michael Lewis returns to Wall Street to report on a high-tech predator stalking the equity markets. Thursday, September 11 at 7:00 p.m. Join us for a book discussion of Cooked, the newest bestseller by Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma. Moderated by Dr. Keith Harris, assistant professor of Food, Bioprocessing & Nutrition Sciences at NC State. About the book: The more we watch food on television, the less food we actually prepare and cook. Michael Pollan’s new book is a clarion-call for the virtues and values of proper cooking – an essential, defining human activity which sits at the heart of our cultures, shapes family life and is in itself hugely enjoyable. Thursday, October 23 at 7:00 p.m. Join us for a book discussion of The Maid’s Version, a short novel by Daniel Woodrell, author of Winter’s Bone. Moderated by Dr.Marc K. Dudley, associate professor of English at NC State. About the book:

In 1929, an explosion at a dance hall in a Missouri town killed 42 people. Who was to blame? Alma Dunahew, whose scandalous younger sister was among the dead, believes she knows the answer – and that its roots lie in a dangerous love affair. But no one will listen to a woman from the wrong side of the tracks. It is only decades later that her grandson listens to her account and unearths the sorry truth. “Exquisite . . . a pleasure to read.” The New York Times

Donor Spotlight: Dr. Ricky and Kim Bloomfield

NCSU Libraries News - Wed, 2014-11-19 12:51

At 17, Dr. Ricky Bloomfield (’04) had pretty definite plans to attend a prestigious local private university. NC State only made it on his list as “backup school.” Until he visited.

The Park Scholarship he was offered was a significant draw, but it was really the sense of excitement and what he calls “the immersion in innovation” that he experienced on his brief trip to campus that set the direction for the rest of his life.

The Bloomfield family, Ricky and Kim,
with daughters Catherine and Miriam.

Just listing Ricky’s undergraduate majors and minors gives you some sense of what he cherished at NC State. There are four—Chemistry, Secondary Education, Saxophone Performance, and Spanish. He’s not one to be put in a box.

That ability to range wide and deep across disciplines led quickly not only to a medical degree, but to the successful iOS apps company he began while still in medical school. Soon he was engrossed in figuring out new ways that mobile applications could help transform the medical field, letting him, as he explains, “combine my passion taking care of patients one at a time with helping out patients millions at a time with medical technology.” Dr. Bloomfield is currently Director, Mobile Technology Strategy for Duke Health Technology Solutions, as well as Assistant Professor in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics at Duke University.

Ricky’s wife, Kim Bloomfield (‘02 in Chemistry and Textile Chemistry), first learned about the Hunt Library on a tour while she was president of the Park Scholars Alumni Society, back when the building was still under construction. “I got excited about it,” she says with some understatement, given the couple’s ongoing passionate support of the new space. “Knowing how much Ricky loves technology and how much I loved studying up in the stacks at D. H. Hill, it was something we became interested in supporting.”

“We are highly into education—and we have kids and want them to be excited about learning. It was a way that I could see getting my own children excited about NC State. And I was sure that the new iconic library would be a benefit to recruiting for the Park Scholarships.” Their two daughters, Ricky explains, will no doubt be NC State, Class of 2028.

“When the Hunt Library was announced, packed full of technology—which is no surprise given NC State’s talents, areas of focus, and research—it really intrigued me,” Ricky continues. “We found out more about it and felt it was something we wanted to get behind.” Right after the building opened, they decided to sponsor and name a student workstation on the building’s 4th floor.

Ricky explains their motivation: “we both went through the Park Scholars program, feel very fortunate in what we were given, and feel an obligation to give back to an institution that has given us so much. We want to see NC State continue to succeed, and the Hunt Library will serve as a rallying point for showcasing talent and innovation. For recruiting, there’s nothing better than taking prospective students to Hunt to show them what NC State can do and hint at the things that they themselves will do once they are here in proximity to all this innovation and technology. Giving back to something that will only make NC State stronger is a no-brainer.”

Their message to young graduates is especially clear. Laughing that they are probably “skewing the age profile of NC State donors down a little,” Kim explains that “we subscribe to the idea that what you spend your money on shows what you believe in. When we began giving to NC State, it wasn’t large amounts—Ricky was still in med school. Recent graduates are sometimes intimidated by hearing about endowed faculty positions or big gifts. But smaller donations made regularly can make a big difference, and they’re more feasible for younger alumni. Our own gifts are not huge, and they did stretch our budget to begin with. But we realized that we can make a huge difference even if we can’t yet endow a chair or name a wing in the library. If recent graduates start from a younger age, this can really make a difference for decades before they enter their golden years.”

As for their investment in the Hunt Library, both have been back many times since the space opened and both are happy, according to Ricky, that it is “living up to its promise as a space where you can let your creativity flow and combine the technologies in ways that are novel and interesting.”

Like their own lives, “things are just getting started. The best is most certainly yet to come.”

First 70 years of the Technician now online

NCSU Libraries News - Tue, 2014-11-18 14:53

As part of our mandate to preserve the history of North Carolina State University and distribute that history widely to scholars, alumni, and the public, the NCSU Libraries has made the first 70 years of the Technician, the university’s student newspaper, available online in a format that is easy to browse and search.

Since it began publishing on February 2, 1920, the Technician has been the school’s most powerful way for students to tell their own stories, to give their perspective on the issues of the times, to influence the direction of the university and the community, and—quite often—to tweak the nose of authority.

The 4000 issues from 1920 through 1990 that are digitized and indexed in the NCSU Libraries’ online collection open a valuable window for historians, social scientists, and others who study the history of NC State and the attitudes and accomplishments of this important slice of our population. They will also be a delight for NC State graduates, staff, and faculty who can now go online and relive their own times at the university—silly fashions, fads, serious issues, and all.

Visitors to vintage Technician issues can, for instance, explore a 1920 sketch of the proposed Bell Tower, enjoy a story on the doubling of the bleacher capacity in October 1921—“that glorious day in football history when N. C. State College will match her strength and skill against the aggregation from the University” at Chapel Hill—or see how the NC State community reacted to the 1970 killings at Kent State University as the Vietnam war divided a campus proud of its long-standing tradition of patriotism and support for the military.

Visits to the campus by John F. Kennedy (1960) and Ronald Reagan (1985) show the range of political interests and views on campus over time, and the yearly April Fools issues establish an enduring heritage of enthusiastic, irreverent, and impolitic student satire and humor.

The online issues of the Technician join a range of other online resources on NC State University history that are available through the NCSU Libraries’ Historical State, Rare & Unique Digital Collections, and Student Leadership websites.

Future plans call for adding issues from the years after 1990 to the Technician collection. To learn how to support this initiative or others from the NCSU Libraries, please visit www.lib.ncsu.edu/giving.

Hunt Library Centerpiece of “Prosperity” Award

Calling it “a smart library for the 21st century,” the Hunt Library was cited as a key factor in the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities’ choice to honor NC State’s Centennial Campus with its second annual Innovation and Economic Prosperity University award as one of the nation’s most innovative and productive economic engines.

Hunt Library Centerpiece of “Prosperity” Award

NCSU Libraries News - Fri, 2014-11-07 10:24

Calling it “a smart library for the 21st century,” the Hunt Library was cited as a key factor in the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities’ choice to honor NC State’s Centennial Campus with its second annual Innovation and Economic Prosperity University award as one of the nation’s most innovative and productive economic engines.

Code+Art Visualization Contest

Design Library News - Thu, 2014-11-06 13:36

The NCSU Libraries is pleased to announce its inaugural Code+Art Visualization Contest. Through a competitive proposal process, the contest encourages students to create large-scale, data-driven “generative art” for the twenty-foot wide Art Wall at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library. Selected proposals will receive a budget, work closely with Libraries staff to realize their project vision, and then compete for a grand prize to be awarded at a Code+Art reception at the Hunt Library in spring 2015.

Find out more here:  http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/codeart

Leading the Pack exhibit explores how student leaders have shaped the NC State legacy

NCSU Libraries News - Mon, 2014-10-27 16:01

On November 3, the NCSU Libraries will open a major exhibit that tells the stories of how students are transformed into leaders at North Carolina State University.  In conjuction with the exhibit, the Libraries will also host a panel discussion during NC State’s Homecoming week that will feature five past student body presidents, including the first female who held this position; a former mayor of Raleigh; and the current senior class president.

Leading the Pack: Student Leaders at NC State explores a rich cultural tradition that encourages students to act on what they are learning.  This alchemy of participation and involvement has produced an unusually large number of citizens who began their lives of service to the university and to the wider community while students at NC State.

When Abraham Lincoln signed the legislation that created land-grant institutions like NC State, he not only created a practical way to make higher education available to motivated, ambitious people who did not have access to the elite private schools of the time; his bold but practical move also provided a perfect model for how real leaders should think deeply about the problems in front of them and then act to solve them.

Transformative leadership was present at NC State’s land grant founding.  And ever since, NC State students have been picking up the tools they discovered on campus and setting out to change the world.  Immersed while on campus in an ethic that asks them to do nothing less than solve global challenges, each generation has left to shape the future in fields as diverse as engineering, public policy, agriculture, defense, design, humanitarian work, medicine, journalism, and business.

Leading the Pack examines that culture of leadership at NC State and follows the stories of those who immersed themselves in student government, student media, ROTC, Greek life, and service projects—or just followed their own geniuses—and learned the skills that later let them serve as the state’s youngest and most re-elected governor, or lead the nation’s military, or establish a non-profit that battles the water-borne illnesses that kill a child every 21 seconds.

Leading the Pack draws on the rich trove of materials collected by the NCSU Libraries’ Student Leadership Initiative.  This ongoing, multi-year program has chronicled the experiences and impact of former student leaders through the collection of hundreds of video oral histories, biographical essays, and digitized images.

During the week of NC State’s Homecoming, the NCSU Libraries will also host a panel discussion of current and past student leaders to explore how NC State fosters leadership and challenges students to make positive change.  The panel will be moderated by Tony Caravano, Student Body President from 2003 to 2005, and will include:

  • Superior Court Judge Ron Spivey, Student Body President, 1981-1982
  • Kelly Hook, Student Body President, 2010-2011
  • Kate Sterling, the first female Student Body President, 1970-1971
  • Smedes York, former NC State basketball player and former mayor of Raleigh
  • Harold Pettigrew, Student Body President, 2000-2001
  • Molly Basdeo, current Senior Class President

The panel discussion will be held on November 6 at 4 p. m. in the Mountains Ballroom at the Talley Student Center.

Both the exhibit and the panel discussion are open and free to the public.  The exhibit may be visited during regular library hours in the D. H. Hill Library’s Exhibit Gallery through the spring of 2015.

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