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The Hunt Library featured in new “Cool Spaces!” PBS series

The Rain Garden Reading Room. © Jeff Goldbery/Esto

The James B. Hunt Jr. Library will be profiled this month in the nationally syndicated PBS series, Cool Spaces!, a new prime-time program that promises to “profile some of this century’s most exciting architecture in the U.S.”

Sponsored by the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and Bluebeam Software and hosted by Boston architect and educator Stephen Chung, the new series focuses “on presenting cutting-edge, contemporary public buildings and spaces and the daring architects who push the boundaries of design and materials.”

Cool Spaces! is scheduled to appear on over 100 public television stations across the country, with coverage in about 95% of households with televisions.

The hour-long episode that features the Hunt Library focuses on three libraries that have been dramatic additions to the cultural lives of their communities.  The Hunt Library shares the stage with the Seattle Central Library—listed by the AIA as one of American’s favorite 150 buildings—and the South Mountain Community Library, celebrated for a bold design that encourages interaction between students and local residents.

Featured in almost 300 media pieces since its opening in January 2013, the Hunt Library has gained an international reputation as “the library of the future” for its immersive technologies and for inspiring learning and teaching spaces that encourage collaboration and cross-disciplinary research. The library’s lead designer, Snøhetta, is known for its work on the National September 11 Memorial and Museum pavilion, the new look for Times Square in New York City, and the Golden State Warriors complex on the San Francisco waterfront.  In 2012, Architecture Magazine ranked executive architects Pearce Brinkley Cease + Lee (now Clark Nexsen) as the15th best firm in the United States.

UNC-TV will make the Hunt Library episode available to its viewers on Thursday, April 10, at 9 p.m. and at multiple other times on that date.  A listing of schedules for PBS stations nationwide can be found on the Cool Spaces! website.

The companion book to Cool Spaces!—also featuring the Hunt Library—can be preordered online from the publisher’s website or from Barnes & Noble.  The book will be available in Barnes & Noble bookstores starting in mid April.

March 2014 Publications from CVM Authors

VetMed News - Tue, 2014-04-01 07:39

March 2014 Publications from CVM Authors

Take a look at the CVM author publications for March 2014 courtesy of the NCSU Scholarly Publications Repository.

CVM and other NCSU authors are specifically highlighted with their department affiliation and links to their other publications in the repository. To access the full text of any of these articles, click on “Find Text (NCSU Only)” link.

If you have questions or would like information about the repository or NCSU publications, please email libraryvetmed@ncsu.edu or call us at 919-513-6218.

Vet Med Library Extended Hours for DVM Spring Exams (4/7 – 19)

VetMed News - Tue, 2014-04-01 07:28

These are the Vet Med Library Pre-Finals, Reading Day and Spring Examination Hours.

April 7 -11 (Monday-Friday) : 6:00am – 12:00am
April 12 (Saturday) : 6:00am – 7:00pm
April 13 (Sunday) : 8:00am – 12:00am
April 14 – 16 (Monday-Wednesday) : 6:00am – 12:00am
April 17 (Thursday) : 6:00am – 6:00pm
April 18 (Friday) : 7:30am – 6:00pm
April 19 (Saturday) : 11:00am – 7:00pm (Regular Hours Resume)

Longer hours are available at the D.H. Hill Library and James B. Hunt Library. See http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/hours/ for all NCSU Libraries Hours.

New films added to Rare and Unique Digital Collections

SCRC News - Mon, 2014-03-31 12:00

We’ve recently added just over a dozen new digitized films related to university history to our Rare and Unique Digital Collections.

College Days NC State, 1950     4H Dress Review Nuclear Reactor     Noise Lab Peace Corps

To discover all of the SCRC’s digitized films, visit the Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections.

Time to Submit Spring Selectives Reserve Readings to VML

VetMed News - Mon, 2014-03-31 09:00

The Veterinary Medicine Library has began processing Spring Selectives requests.  CVM Faculty who need to put materials on reserve may submit a reading list (or email it as an attachment to libraryvetmed@ncsu.edu) by Friday, April 11th.  To help us expedite your request, please specify the email subject as Reserve Request.  In addition to your name and course name/number, provide complete citations (title, author, and full call number) for titles desired.

The Libraries’ reserve management system offers you or your designate an opportunity to manage many aspects of the course reading page. Please visit the reserves management system at https://reserves.lib.ncsu.edu/ where you can make your requests.

For additional information on VML reserves services and quick access to the system, go to  Course Reserves. If you need assistance or have questions, please contact Betsy Whitman at libraryvetmed@ncsu.edu or phone 919-513-6218.

100 Years of Extension: Celebrating the Past, Looking to the Future

SCRC News - Thu, 2014-03-27 16:41

This week is Agriculture Awareness Week, and to help celebrate it, the Libraries is curating a small exhibit that marks the 100th anniversary of the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service. The federal Smith-Lever Act in 1914 funded life-changing educational programs at NC State and other land-grant universities across the country. Even earlier, the seeds for Extension were sown by a “see-for-yourself” demonstration movement for farmers and rural families in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Early pioneers included Seaman Knapp, A.B. Graham, Booker T. Washington, and North Carolina’s own Jane S. McKimmon.

These educators’ ideals transformed the way land-grant universities saw their roles. Cooperative Extension placed professional educators in local communities with the mission of improving lives. Today, North Carolina Cooperative Extension has programs in all 100 counties and on the Qualla Boundary of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians. These programs draw on research-based knowledge from NC State and NC A&T — the state’s two land-grant universities — to help North Carolinians to move forward and prosper.

To help farmers better produce food, feed, and fiber, Extension has taught improved agricultural techniques, introduced better varieties, improved soil conditions, and promoted mechanization. Shown here is John Johnson and 68.5 bushels of corn produced on one acre of his Scotland Neck farm in 1939.

Extension has also promoted pest management and the cure and prevention of plant diseases. For example, in the 1920s a focus was boll weevil eradication. The insect threatened major damage to the cotton crop in North Carolina and throughout the South.

In 1917 Extension began promoting forestry and timber management as potential revenue sources for North Carolina farms with extensive tree stands. Shown here are workers preparing pulpwood, circa 1930.

Before the 1930s, most North Carolina farms lacked access to electricity. During the New Deal, Extension became a partner in rural electrification, and it promoted the labor saving benefits of electric power. New appliances allowed some farmers to expand into other commodities.

Extension has also focused on soil conservation. Methods for combating erosion have been growing vetch (shown here at a Pineville farm in 1937) and terracing fields.

Cooperative Extension has a long history of youth programs. Boys corn clubs and girls tomato and canning clubs began in 1909 and 1911, respectively. These programs were the beginnings of 4-H in the state. Shown here are youth clubs, circa 1920.

Extension has offered programs for women since the mothers of girls’ canning club members asked for their own clubs in the early 1910s. These programs were originally called “Home Demonstration.” The women’s clubs also raised gardens and canned produce, and they held curb markets as a way for women to earn their own money, as seen in this photo.

During World War II, 4-H youth contributed to the war effort. By raising food in the Feed a Fighter drive, North Carolina 4-Hers were honored by naming two warships, including the U.S.S. Tyrrell, launched from Wilmington in 1944.

Home Demonstration also formed groups for sewing (as seen in this photo from the 1940s), making mattresses, and even upholstering furniture. Today the program is called Family and Consumer Sciences, and it has expanded well beyond its original activities.

The exhibit will be on display in the circulation lobby of D. H. Hill Library until April 4, 2014. The Special Collections Research Center holds many items documenting the history of extension in North Carolina. To discover images similar to those on display in the exhibit, visit the Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections.

The Friday Forum with Special Collections: Documenting Modernism at the College of Design

SCRC News - Mon, 2014-03-24 13:47

This week, the Special Collections Research Center will be holding a special event at the College of Design.

In conjunction with the AIA Triangle and NCSU School of Architecture Joint Lecture Series on Situated Modernisms & Global Practice, the NCSU Libraries’ Special Collections Research Center (SCRC) is holding a “show and tell” event at the College of Design that will showcase some of its unique materials. The Friday Forum will be held on March 28 from 12:00 – 1:30 in the Belk Rotunda at Brooks Hall. The event is free and open to the public.

This event will complement the lecture on Monday, March 24, at 6:00 pm in Burns Auditorium in Kamphoefner Hall, featuring Roger Clark, FAIA, and Margret Kentgens-Craig. The Friday Forum with Special Collections on March 28 will give faculty, students, and others interested in modernist architecture and the history of the College of Design (previously the School of Design) an opportunity to view materials from Special Collections, including original works by Matthew Nowicki, George Matsumoto, G. Milton Small, and other luminaries who were associated with the College. Items that document the history of the College will also be on display, including materials that reflect the tenure and influence of the School’s first dean, Henry Kamphoefner.

The Hunt Library wins prestigious Stanford Prize

Hunt Library Teaching and Visualization Lab. ©Jeff Goldberg/Esto

Cited for “the creative and bold vision that went into designing an innovative model for a research library as a high-technology research platform,” the James B. Hunt Jr. Library at North Carolina State University has been awarded the prestigious 2014 Stanford Prize for Innovation in Research Libraries (SPIRL).

Judged by an international panel of library and academic leaders, SPIRL was established by the Stanford Libraries in 2013 “to single out for community attention and to celebrate functionally significant results of the innovative impulses in research libraries worldwide.”

“Our vision was to give NC State a signature library that would help us recruit the very best students and the very best faculty and to serve the community as an inspiring place of excellence and passion and ideas and vision,” says Susan K. Nutter, Vice Provost and Director of Libraries at NC State. “We could not be more honored that our vision and hard work have been awarded the Stanford Prize.”

Schedule and mobile app now available for the 2014 NC Literary Festival

To make it easy for you to plan in advance to see your favorites among the over 100 authors, performers, and programs available April 3-6, the daily schedule for the 2014 North Carolina Literary Festival is now available, both online and on the Festival’s free app, which you can download to your mobile device from m.guidebook.com.

The choices could be difficult, with winners of four Pulitzers, a half dozen National Book and National Book Critics Circle awards, many of your favorite North Carolina authors, the creator of the Goosebumps series, the author of The Jane Austen Book Club, and great programs for children in the Festival lineup.

Highlights include:

Thursday, April 3
  • Lev Grossman, book critic for Time magazine and author of Warp, Codex (an international bestseller), The Magicians (a New York Times bestseller) and The Magician King (also a Times bestseller).
  • Literary trivia at the Cameron Bar and Grill.
Friday, April 4
  • Junot Díaz, recipient of a MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship and author of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, winner of the 2008 Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award.
  • Bourbon tastings, Irish lit and drink specials, the Monti storytelling contest, and The Morning After band in venues in downtown Raleigh.
Saturday, April 5
  • Writer, musician, and screenwriter James McBride, author of the landmark memoir The Color of Water and 2013 winner of the National Book Award.
  • R. L. Stine, the Stephen King of children’s fiction, as well as Paul Muldoon, Karen Joy Fowler, and William T. Vollmann.
  • North Carolina authors Jill McCorkle, Ben Fountain, and Daniel Wallace.
  • Panels on the future of storytelling, poetry, forensics, African-American women’s voices, and first novels.
  • A host of activities for children and parents.
  • Workshops on bookmaking, pop-up books, comics, and making electronic music.
Sunday, April 6
  • Richard Ford, Pulitzer Prize winner and author of The Sportswriter and its sequels, Independence Day and The Lay of the Land.
  • North Carolina authors Lee Smith, Wiley Cash, Elizabeth Spencer, Allan Gurganus, and the NC Literary Hall of Fame and the Lee Smith Award.
  • Additional events for children and young adults, including The Story Squad and Poetry Out Loud

The majority of the NC Literary Festival will be held in and around NC State’s new James B. Hunt Jr. Library.  As the “face of NC State in the 21st century,” this new space has generated international attention for its iconic architecture, its transformative technologies, and its simulation and large-scale visualization spaces that encourage and enable new forms of storytelling. The Hunt Library will serve as the centerpiece for the NC Literary Festival’s theme, “The Future of Reading.”

The NC Literary Festival is hosted on a rotating basis by the academic libraries at NC State University, Duke University, and the University of North Carolina.  The event is free and open to the public.

____________________

Laureate sponsors for the 2014 festival include PNC, Our State magazine, The Friends of the Library of North Carolina State University, and the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources that has administered grant funds from the Institute of Museum and Library Services under the provisions of the federal Library Services and Technology Act.

New Materials March 17

VetMed News - Mon, 2014-03-17 15:44

Agricultural Engineering Drawings (1920s-1990s) Now Available

SCRC News - Mon, 2014-03-17 10:39

This silo is representative of the Drawings and Plans Series, with plans, elevations, and cross-sections

Researchers can now access a great collection of drawings of agricultural and rural structures. Rural electrification, architecture, agricultural innovation, and even animal welfare are just a few of the themes that could be explored through these documents. Other possible topics for study include the history of women and children, as well as leisure studies. These drawings were created by the Department of Biological & Agricultural Engineering and disseminated through the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service. They have recently been inventoried by Special Collections and added to the department’s records.

More than 1100 drawings range in date from the 1920s to the 1990s. They include plans, elevations, details, and depictions, mostly of agricultural structures for cows, pigs, and chickens, but also for rabbits, sheep, and turkeys. They were used for feeding, breeding, and shelter. Some are structures built specifically for North Carolina county fairs. There are also plans for privately-owned farms and plants throughout North Carolina, usually for particular structures or landscaping elements. Farm equipment is also represented, such as feeders, spreaders, harvesters, and hay driers. Interestingly, designs for non-agricultural buildings and objects are also found in the collection. These include local community houses, 4-H camps, playgrounds, athletic fields, roadside stands and markets, cabins, vacation houses, and recreational equipment. They provide a rich historical archive of agricultural and recreational structures of North Carolina during this time period.

Some drawings reflect transitions in agriculture during the twentieth century. Those of a 1940 mule barn reflect old practices still in effect at the end of the Great Depression. From the 1940s, electric brooders and dehydrators show the impact of rural electrification. From 1976, a bulk curing barn for tobacco reveals the spread of new production techniques that resulted from research at colleges and universities (in this case, procedures developed at NC State). Also of note are drawings for curbside markets, used by rural women in home demonstration clubs to sell produce and earn their own money, and plans for a Swansboro, North Carolina, 4-H camp, originally a segregated facility for African American youth.

Many drawings were created through the Cooperative Farm Building Plan Exchange. Through this program, each land-grant university submitted plans to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which then disseminated them to other land-grant institutions across the country. Farmers obtained plans from their local Cooperative Extension agents, free of charge, for construction on their farms. Therefore, this collection may document structures not just in North Carolina but throughout the entire United States. Some plans may have also been modified for the specific needs of individual North Carolina farms.

The drawings in this collection can be viewed at the Special Collections Reading Room of the D. H. Hill Library. Interested persons can select drawings from the inventory and then request them through our webform. The records of the Biological & Agricultural Engineering Department have not yet been fully digitized, but some texts and video are available on Special Collections’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections website. The Department of Biological & Agricultural Engineering has existed since 1940, although courses in agricultural engineering date back to the founding of the university. A history of it exists on the department’s website.

Wolfprint Update – Check SysNews

VetMed News - Thu, 2014-03-13 09:22

For the latest status reports on the Wolfprint conversion problem, visit SysNews. Wolfprint apologizes for the delay and inconvenience for those not on spring break this week.

Men’s Basketball Emerges

SCRC News - Mon, 2014-03-10 13:09

On February 8, 1911, the A&M College (later known as NCSU) basketball team played its first game against Wake Forest. Known as the Red Terrors until 1947, when all athletics teams at NCSU adopted the name “Wolfpack,” the men’s basketball team has been a member of multiple conferences and the winner of numerous championships, including the 1974 and 1983  NCAA men’s basketball championships. Since the early 1950s, much of the history of this team has been captured on film.

Two years ago the Special Collections Research Center realized that this rich history, located within a University Archives audiovisual collection that had swelled to over 300 cartons of audiovisual materials, should be made more accessible for the university community and other fans. While half of this collection was processed, the other half remained unprocessed. Identifying and locating the men’s basketball audiovisual materials would be difficult without a detailed inventory. Step 1 was to get a handle on the extent of the collection. Each carton (both processed and unprocessed) was ordered from an off-site shelving facility and inventoried for title, year, and format. We discovered 35mm still image film, 8mm, 16mm, VHS, Betacam, Betamax, U-matic, reel to reel audio tapes, cassette tapes, LPs, CDs, and DVDs, just to name the most popular formats. The content of these materials varied as well – recruitment films, educational films, sound recordings, coaches’ films, speeches, Chancellor inductions, and the list goes on.

1961-1962

Step 2 involved removing men’s basketball materials from the detailed inventory to create its own separate subseries. The Men’s Basketball Audiovisual Materials collection, dated from 1953 – 1994, consists primarily of coaches’ films taken from the bleachers/sidelines. These films were primarily used by coaches for training purposes. There are a smattering of other types films in this collection as well, including copies of some broadcast videos. Some of the coaches’ films have been digitized and can be found online on our Rare and Unique Digital Collections website. Having the men’s basketball materials available for researchers to locate is an exciting step in our audiovisual collections processing plan!

Stay tuned as we process other unique audiovisual collections – next is women’s basketball!

For questions about this or any of our collections, please contact the Special Collections Research Center.

VML hours during CVM Spring Break (March 17-22)

VetMed News - Mon, 2014-03-10 10:00

The Veterinary Medicine Library has the following hours for CVM Spring Break:

March 17 – 21 (Monday – Friday) : 7:30am  – 6:00pm

March 22 (Saturday): 1:00pm – 5:00pm

(Regular hours resume Sunday, March 23)

The D. H. Hill Library and James B. Hunt Library are open 24 hours.  See All NCSU Libraries Hours.

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