Feed aggregator

New Dorton Arena images now available!

Design Library News - Mon, 2015-10-05 16:26

The Special Collections Research Center continues to scan new materials in order to improve access to its rich collections. We are pleased to share some new scans of the Dorton Arena that were taken during its construction. The images are a part of the James L. Brandt Papers, which include materials that belonged to (and were also collected by) NCSU Design graduate James Lewis Brandt. Brandt worked for architect G. Milton Small and retired in 1991. To explore more of our digital resources, click here.

Biological Illustration Coffee & Viz – Dr. Jennifer Landin, Fri, Oct. 23

VetMed News - Tue, 2015-09-29 08:35


Friday, October 23, 2015
9:30am – 10:30am


Teaching and Visualization Lab at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library

Event Description

Dr. Jennifer Landin, assistant professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at NC State, is a biologist, illustrator and science educator. She will discuss biological illustration as a form of visualization and the challenges in teaching students to observe, investigate, create and share.

Contact Information Karen Ciccone (919) 515-3513 kacollin@ncsu.edu Admission Information

Free and open to the public.

Other Information

Light refreshments will be available in an adjacent space beginning at 9:15 a.m.

Graphic Design classes visit Special Collections

Design Library News - Tue, 2015-09-22 09:23

Last week was a busy week in Special Collections – two Graphic Design classes, GD 231 and GD 203 (taught by Russell Flinchum and Deb Littlejohn, respectively) reviewed a large selection of books with interesting design components.

GD 231, History of Design for Engineers and Scientists:

Russell Flinchum shared some background on this course:

During July 2015 I had a very special opportunity to spent a month at Drexel University in Philadelphia at a NEH Summer Institute on “The Canon and Beyond: Teaching the History of Modern Design.” With my 26 classmates, I had the chance to visit a number of special collections, including the Hagley Museum and Library, where Dr. Regina Lee Blaszczyk, Leadership Chair in the History of Business and Society at the University of Leeds, took us on an impressive journey on the role of color in 19th century design (her 2012 book, The Color Revolution, is highly recommended). Reggie’s workshop had clued me in to the extensive network of publications focused on color research and standardization and I was able to show my students the Hoechst Company’s impressive volume on Cotton Dyeing as an example of the primary materials that Professor Blaszczyk had worked from.

For the GD 231 class, Special Collections selected volumes on the early applications of electricity, mechanical engineering, supply catalogs, and other books that showed Flinchum’s students what “the state of the art” was over a century ago and how information-rich that environment was.

GD 203, History of Graphic Design:

The students in Littlejohn’s class had a large list of books to select from, such as this perennial favorite by  E. A. Seguy. While studying their books, the students will consider some of these questions, all provided by Dr. Littlejohn:

In the first (subjective) part, think about and write about your experience with the book, such as:

What is my first visual impression of the book?
What is the physical nature of the book? Size, weight, binding, paper
How do I sense the book? Look, touch, smell, hear (don’t taste!)
What about the physical nature of the book interests me?
What is interesting about the design? Typography? images? cover? layout? etc.

In the second (objective) part, research and answer some of these questions (all questions are unlikely to be pertinent to each book, choose wisely):

(everyone must answer this) Why is this book in the collection? Why is it important enough to collect?
What is this book valued for? (may be more than one thing) subject matter, author, design, age, writing, illustrations, printing, previous owners, where produced
Is this book mentioned in books about the history of books and printing? (Z 250 section of the library)
How does this book fit in with history? Printing history, art/design history, history of a discipline, etc.
Is this book an example of something special? a beginning, an end, a particular style, etc.
Is this book part of the development of something?
If there are important individuals involved in the book’s making, who are they?
Is this book connected with any other books in the collection? In a series, by the same author, by the same designer, about the same subject, etc. Does this add to its importance?

We look forward to working with these classes again next year!

New Materials September 21

VetMed News - Mon, 2015-09-21 13:49

NCSU Libraries to Offer Second Round of Alt-Textbook Grants

NRL News - Wed, 2015-09-16 09:20
All NC State faculty teaching courses this Spring or in Fall 2016 are eligible to apply

(Raleigh, N.C.) – In Fall 2014, the NCSU Libraries, with support from the NC State University Foundation, awarded a first round of Alt-Textbook grants to faculty to adopt, adapt, or create free or low-cost alternatives to expensive textbooks. The first round is in progress and is expected to save NC State students more than $200,000 in the first year.

Textbook costs have outpaced inflation by 300% over the last 30 years. These runaway prices have become a major strain on students, with textbooks averaging $1,200 a year and 7 out of 10 students admitting on a recent Public Interest Research Group survey that they have not purchased a required text because of its cost.

The NCSU Libraries is committed to fostering change in the current textbook publishing environment. The Alt-Textbook Project will empower faculty to innovate pedagogically; enhance access for NC State students to high-quality, tailored educational materials; and reduce the financial burden of expensive textbooks.

Led by Will Cross, Director of the NCSU Libraries Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center, a committee made up of librarians will be available to partner with faculty members on licensing resources, using digital repositories, and creating and publishing their own open educational resources.

Ranging between $500 and $2,000, the competitive Alt-Textbook grants will be awarded to help faculty pursue innovative uses of technology and information resources that can replace pricey traditional textbooks. Larger grants may be available for larger-scale or especially high-impact projects.

Grants are available to develop textbook alternatives for the Spring 2015 and Fall 2016 semesters. Possible approaches include:

  • creating a new open textbook or collection of materials
  • adopting an existing open textbook
  • assembling a collection of open resources into new course materials
  • licensing an e-textbook, video, or other media content for classroom use or e-reserves
  • using subscribed library resources

As faculty work on their proposals, NCSU librarians and staff are available to collaborate and share expertise in copyright, licensing, open access, course management software and tools, electronic reserves, subject-matter content, and multimedia resources.

The NCSU Libraries will hold several information sessions about the project. Faculty can learn more about the project, review the call for proposals, sign up for information sessions, and download grant applications at the Alt-Textbook Project website.

National Medal of Technology and Innovation Recipient Donates Papers to NCSU Libraries

NRL News - Tue, 2015-09-08 11:59

Dr. Jayant Baliga, an internationally recognized leader in electrical and computer engineering, has donated his papers to the North Carolina State University Libraries. Lauded by Scientific American as one of the heroes of the semiconductor revolution, Baliga received this year’s Global Energy Prize.

In addition to being a distinguished professor of electrical and computer engineering, Dr. Baliga is the director of NC State’s Power Semiconductor Research Center. Among his many accomplishments, he is perhaps best known for his invention of a power semiconductor device, the insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT), often used as an electronic switch in modern appliances, from electric cars to air conditioners to portable defibrillators. The IGBT, as he describes it, has had “a major impact on creating a sustainable world-wide society with improved living standards while mitigating the environmental impact.”

According to Dr. Louis A. Martin-Vega, Dean of Engineering at NC State, Dr. Baliga’s “groundbreaking scholarship and leadership have been instrumental in addressing major global societal challenges and helping the College of Engineering and NC State become a research powerhouse. Throughout his career, Jay has generously shared his expertise with our students and faculty so I am not surprised and very pleased that he has chosen to share his life’s work with future students and faculty through the NCSU Libraries.”

Baliga has received numerous awards during his distinguished career, some of which include the 2014 IEEE Medal of Honor, the 2011 National Medal of Technology and Innovation from President Obama, the 2012 North Carolina Award for Science, the 1999 IEEE Lamme Medal, the 1998 IEEE Ebers Award, the 1998 O. Max Gardner Award, the 1993 IEEE Liebman Award, the 1992 Pride of India Award (First Recipient), and the 2011 Alexander Quarles Holladay Medal for Excellence.

He is a Member of the National Academy of Engineering, the Electronic Design Engineering Hall of Fame, the Rensselaer Alumni Hall of Fame, the European Academy of Sciences, and he is an IEEE Life Fellow. Baliga has authored or edited 19 books and over 500 scientific articles and has been granted 120 U.S. Patents.

Baliga received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering (1974) and his M.S. in Electrical Engineering (1971) from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. He spent fifteen years at the General Electric Research and Development Center, leading their power device studies. There, he received the highest scientific rank of Coolidge Fellow. Baliga joined NCSU in 1988 as a Full Professor and was promoted in 1997 as Distinguished University Professor.

His papers will be housed in the Special Collections Research Center at NCSU Libraries and include records from the Power Semiconductor Research Center—meeting documents, vendor information, software agreements, technical working group meeting reports, and related administrative files. Also included in his Papers are Electric Power Research Institute patent applications and other like materials.

The SCRC holds research and primary resources in areas that reflect and support the teaching and research needs of the students, faculty, and researchers at the university. By emphasizing established and emerging areas of excellence at NC State University and corresponding strengths within the Libraries’ overall collection, the SCRC develops collections strategically in order to support NC State’s growth as a world-class academic institution.

August 2015 Publications from CVM Authors

VetMed News - Tue, 2015-09-01 07:59

August 2015 Publications from CVM Authors
Take a look at the CVM author publications for August 2015 courtesy of the NCSU Scholarly Publications Repository.
CVM and other NCSU authors are specifically highlighted with their department affiliation and links to their other publications in the repository. To access the full text of any of these articles, click on “Find Text (NCSU Only)” link.
If you have questions or would like information about the repository or NCSU publications, please email libraryvetmed@ncsu.edu or call us at 919-513-6218.

Vet Med Library Reduced Hours Sept. 6 – Sept. 7 (Sun/Mon) for the Labor Day Holiday

VetMed News - Fri, 2015-08-28 09:00

The Veterinary Medicine Library has the following Labor Day Holiday Hours:

  • September 5 (Saturday): 11am – 7pm – Regular Hours
  • September 6 (Sunday): 1pm – 5pm
  • September 7 (Monday): 1pm – 8pm
  • September 8 (Tuesday): 7am – 11pm  - Regular Hours Resume

See https://www.lib.ncsu.edu/hours/hill/general for all NCSU Libraries Hours.