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The Max Desfor Photographs and Papers

SCRC News - Mon, 2014-06-09 10:00

It is our great pleasure to announce that the Max Desfor Photographs and Papers is now processed and open for research. The collection guide is available here. Max Desfor was an Associated Press photographer who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1951 in the general photography category for his coverage of the Korean War in a photo, “Flight of Refugees Across Wrecked Bridge in Korea,” taken in 1950, of Korean refugees fleeing along the twisted girders of a bombed bridge.

Flight of Refugees Across Wrecked Bridge in Korea, 1950, Associated Press

Desfor was born in New York City on November 8, 1913. He studied at Brooklyn College in New York. He started his career at the Associated Press in 1933 as a darkroom assistant. In 1938, Desfor became staff photographer at the Associated Press bureau in Baltimore, Maryland. In 1939 he joined the Associated Press staff in Washington, D.C. In 1942 he was promoted to photo editor and in 1944 he was promoted to war correspondent and assigned to photograph Admiral Nimitz’s command in the Pacific Ocean area.

This collection contains photographs taken by Max Desfor while he was employed with the Associated Press from 1940 to 1968. There are also newspaper clippings, personal correspondence, business correspondence and other files dating from 1942 to 2008, as well as numerous photographs and negatives dating from 1936 to 2008. Also included in the collection are many photographs and negatives dated from 1936 to 2008 documenting Desfor’s experiences in Korea, Japan, India and many other places, both foreign and domestic. Some are photographs Desfor took for AP jobs while others are personal. There are some famous faces included such as Mahatma Gandhi and Princess Elizabeth. The collection also contains videocassettes and CDs ranging in dates from 1985 to 2008, although most of them are undated, as well as slides from 1969 to 1972. The dates for the entire collection range from 1936 to 2008, and it totals 9.5 linear feet.

Gandhi Fasts for Peace, 1948, Associated Press

Caption accompanying photo: GANDHI FASTS FOR PEACE: Wearing a loin cloth and shawl, Mohandas K. Gandhi squats before a microphone in New Delhi, India, to deliver prayer meeting discourse during second day of his fast to force communal peace in India. The 78-year-old Indian patriot ended his 121-hour fast on Jan. 18 when he won a pledge of harmony from religious leaders of India. Date: 1/22/48 for the Associated Press

This is a unique collection for the SCRC at N.C. State and will be of interest to a variety of researchers, particularly those interested in photography in general and those interested in news photography of the mid-20th century of war zones like those in Korea and Japan. For more information about the collection, please consult the collection guide.

Exploring the Animal Welfare Archival Collections at the NCSU Libraries

VetMed News - Wed, 2014-06-04 16:16

North Carolina State University (NCSU) Libraries was supported by a grant from the Council on Library and Information Resources to describe its holdings of the records of the Animal Rights Network (ARN), portions of the records of the Animal Welfare Institute (AWI), and hundreds of audio and videotapes documenting conferences, demonstrations, debates, and oral histories with important figures in the these movements, most recorded by Ron Scott.

The Animal Welfare Institute (AWI) files address the treatment of animals in all aspects of society, including agriculture, industry, science, conservation, and recreation. The collection contains correspondence and other material from the AWI and its lobbying organization, the Society for Animal Protective Legislation, on national issues related to the humane treatment of animals in laboratories and farms, as well as international issues such as whaling and the exotic animal trade. It also documents groups on all sides of the animal welfare movement.

View a PDF of a brief presentation about the Animal Welfare Institute and Animal Rights Network records by Project Librarian Jodi Berkowitz. For details about the holdings in each collection, visit the finding aids:

For information about accessing these materials through the NCSU Libraries’ Special Collections Research Center, please visit www.lib.ncsu.edu/scrc/using-materials.

May 2014 Publications from CVM Authors

VetMed News - Tue, 2014-06-03 15:54

May 2014 Publications from CVM Authors

Take a look at the CVM author publications for May 2014 courtesy of the NCSU Scholarly Publications Repository.

CVM and other NCSU authors are specifically highlighted with their department affiliation and links to their other publications in the repository. To access the full text of any of these articles, click on “Find Text (NCSU Only)” link.

If you have questions or would like information about the repository or NCSU publications, please email libraryvetmed@ncsu.edu or call us at 919-513-6218.

Civets and Tarsiers and Tapirs (oh my!)

VetMed News - Tue, 2014-06-03 13:12

This post is contributed by Ashley Williams, Project Archivist, Animal Rights and Animal Welfare Collections.

Included in the Animal Welfare Institute Records is a collection of photographs by Ernest P. Walker. When I first encountered the photographs I was amazed by the sheer variety of animals photographed. There are pictures of lions, tigers, and bears (oh my!), but also several animals I had never heard of or did not know what they looked like: civets, lemmings, tapirs, and tarsiers (also known as bush babies), to name a few. I was intrigued to learn about these animals and curious as to the images I would come across. The collection did not disappoint.

Civet

Given the number and quality of the photographs, I realized this collection was likely not created by an average animal-loving person. My thoughts turned to “who in the world is Ernest P. Walker and why did he take all of these pictures?” I was quickly able to learn more about him: he worked as a warden and inspector for the United States Bureau of Fisheries in Alaska in the 1910s upon graduating from college. After a three year stint as a game warden in Arizona and California, Walker returned to Alaska in 1921 with the United States Biological Survey as a fur and game warden and executive officer for the Alaska Game Commission. In 1927, Walker moved to Washington, DC and assumed the role of assistant director of the National Zoological Park in 1930, where he remained until 1956.

Lemming

Walker was more concerned with mammals as living animals rather than their individual biological components. Over the years, he observed their feeding habits, care of young, and other behavioral characteristics and began taking photographic portraits of many species. To observe certain small mammals more closely than his duties at the zoo would allow, he brought them into his home as pets. Most of the photographs date from his term as assistant director.

Tarsier

Upon retiring from the National Zoo, Walker, along with his qualified assistants, compiled data, prepared photographs, and arranged a manuscript into what would become the three-volume Mammals of the World. Two of his other works are Walker’s Bats of the World and Walker’s Primates of the World, all of which are available at the NCSU Libraries. Information about the animals’ breeding, habitats, food, and physical description, along with a photograph or illustration, is included for all but four animals. Additionally, Walker wrote two books for the Animal Welfare Institute: First Aid and Care of Small Mammals and Studying Small Mammals.

South American Tapir

To learn more about Ernest Walker’s photographs, or about the Animal Welfare Institute Records, be sure to check out the collection guide.

Civets and Tarsiers and Tapirs (oh my!)

NRL News - Tue, 2014-06-03 13:11

This post is contributed by Ashley Williams, Project Archivist, Animal Rights and Animal Welfare Collections.

Included in the Animal Welfare Institute Records is a collection of photographs by Ernest P. Walker. When I first encountered the photographs I was amazed by the sheer variety of animals photographed. There are pictures of lions, tigers, and bears (oh my!), but also several animals I had never heard of or did not know what they looked like: civets, lemmings, tapirs, and tarsiers (also known as bush babies), to name a few. I was intrigued to learn about these animals and curious as to the images I would come across. The collection did not disappoint.

Civet

Given the number and quality of the photographs, I realized this collection was likely not created by an average animal-loving person. My thoughts turned to “who in the world is Ernest P. Walker and why did he take all of these pictures?” I was quickly able to learn more about him: he worked as a warden and inspector for the United States Bureau of Fisheries in Alaska in the 1910s upon graduating from college. After a three year stint as a game warden in Arizona and California, Walker returned to Alaska in 1921 with the United States Biological Survey as a fur and game warden and executive officer for the Alaska Game Commission. In 1927, Walker moved to Washington, DC and assumed the role of assistant director of the National Zoological Park in 1930, where he remained until 1956.

Lemming

Walker was more concerned with mammals as living animals rather than their individual biological components. Over the years, he observed their feeding habits, care of young, and other behavioral characteristics and began taking photographic portraits of many species. To observe certain small mammals more closely than his duties at the zoo would allow, he brought them into his home as pets. Most of the photographs date from his term as assistant director.

Tarsier

Upon retiring from the National Zoo, Walker, along with his qualified assistants, compiled data, prepared photographs, and arranged a manuscript into what would become the three-volume Mammals of the World. Two of his other works are Walker’s Bats of the World and Walker’s Primates of the World, all of which are available at the NCSU Libraries. Information about the animals’ breeding, habitats, food, and physical description, along with a photograph or illustration, is included for all but four animals. Additionally, Walker wrote two books for the Animal Welfare Institute: First Aid and Care of Small Mammals and Studying Small Mammals.

South American Tapir

To learn more about Ernest Walker’s photographs, or about the Animal Welfare Institute Records, be sure to check out the collection guide.

Content, Context, Capacity available online in its entirety

SCRC News - Mon, 2014-06-02 13:02

For the last four years, the NCSU Libraries has been participating in the planning and execution of a multi-institution project to digitize hundreds of thousands of archival pages. The project, “Content, Content, and Capacity,” has been a collaboration with the Triangle Research Libraries Network and the university libraries at UNC Chapel Hill, Duke University, and North Carolina Central University.

Now, all pages from the SCRC scanned through the project–all 99,943 of them–are available online!

The last two new collections added to the Libraries Rare and Unique Digital Collections site are:

68 folders from the William Dallas Herring Collections (MC270)

88 folders from Society of Women Engineers (UA021.497)

We also recently added almost 150 digitized folders to collections that already had some digitized materials online:

Office for Equal Opportunity and Equity Records (UA005.009)

Cary Hoyt Bostian Records (UA002.001.003)

And here’s the collection in its entirety.

These resources are and will be available as part of the NCSU Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to thousands of images, video, and audio recordings, and text documenting NC State history.

New Materials May 27

VetMed News - Tue, 2014-05-27 10:33
Small animal anesthesia techniques
Shelby, Amanda, author.

Cary Hoyt Bostian Records online

SCRC News - Mon, 2014-05-19 09:19

As part of Content, Context, and Capacity, we have digitized the first 14 boxes of the Cary Hoyt Bostian Records. This covers 1954-1957, Bostian’s first full three years as Chancellor of NC State, and a time when the university (then college) began to integrate. This was just one of several important changes that occurred during Bostian’s tenure.

These materials are now available online in our Rare and Unique Digital Collections site. Below is the first page of the script of Bostian’s installation speech.

To discover all of the SCRC’s digitized resources, visit the Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections.

Vet Med Library Memorial Day Holiday Hours (May 24 – 27)

VetMed News - Mon, 2014-05-19 09:00

The Veterinary Medicine Library has the following Memorial Day Holiday hours:

May 24 (Saturday): 1:00pm – 5:00pm – Regular Hours

May 25 (Sunday): 1:00pm – 5:00pm – Regular Hours

May 26 (Monday): 1:00pm – 5:00pm Email to libraryvetmed@ncsu.edu will not be monitored Monday 5/26 so please call 919-513-6218 if you need immediate assistance.**

May 27 (Tuesday): 7:30am – 9:00pm  – Regular Hours Resume

** Memorial Day hours at D.H. Hill Library and James B. Hunt Library are 9:00am – 6:00 pm. See http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/hours/ for all NCSU Libraries Hours.

Drop-in Statistical Consulting Services for the Veterinary Scholars Program during Summer 2014 in the VML

VetMed News - Wed, 2014-05-14 13:36




The Department of Statistics is pleased to offer drop-in statistical consulting services for the Veterinary Scholars Program during the summer of 2014.

Yiqing Tian and Emily Griffith will be available on a first-come, first-serve basis between 1:30 and 4:30pm in the Veterinary Medicine Library on the dates listed below.

Please come by for assistance with data organization, analysis, software, presentation, or any other statistical need and they will be happy to help!

May 2014:

Thursday, 5/22: A-107
Monday, 5/26: A-104
Tuesday, 5/27: A-107
Wednesday, 5/28: A-104
Thursday, 5/29: A-104

July 2014:

Tues., 7/1 and Wed., 7/2: A-104
No consulting 7/3
Mon., 7/7 through Thurs., 7/10: A-104
Mon., 7/14 through Thurs., 7/17: A-104

June 2014:

Mon., 6/2 through Thurs., 6/5: A-104
Mon., 6/9 through Thurs., 6/12: A-104
Monday, 6/16: Location TBA
Tues., 6/17 through Thurs., 6/19: A-104
Monday, 6/23: A-104
Tuesday, 6/24: A-107
Wednesday, 6/25: A-107
Thursday, 6/26: A-104
Monday, 6/30: A-104

Civets and Tarsiers and Tapirs (oh my!)

SCRC News - Mon, 2014-05-12 08:00

This post is contributed by Ashley Williams, Project Archivist, Animal Rights and Animal Welfare Collections.

Included in the Animal Welfare Institute Records is a collection of photographs by Ernest P. Walker. When I first encountered the photographs I was amazed by the sheer variety of animals photographed. There are pictures of lions, tigers, and bears (oh my!), but also several animals I had never heard of or did not know what they looked like: civets, lemmings, tapirs, and tarsiers (also known as bush babies), to name a few. I was intrigued to learn about these animals and curious as to the images I would come across. The collection did not disappoint.

Civet

Given the number and quality of the photographs, I realized this collection was likely not created by an average animal-loving person. My thoughts turned to “who in the world is Ernest P. Walker and why did he take all of these pictures?” I was quickly able to learn more about him: he worked as a warden and inspector for the United States Bureau of Fisheries in Alaska in the 1910s upon graduating from college. After a three year stint as a game warden in Arizona and California, Walker returned to Alaska in 1921 with the United States Biological Survey as a fur and game warden and executive officer for the Alaska Game Commission. In 1927, Walker moved to Washington, DC and assumed the role of assistant director of the National Zoological Park in 1930, where he remained until 1956.

Lemming

Walker was more concerned with mammals as living animals rather than their individual biological components. Over the years, he observed their feeding habits, care of young, and other behavioral characteristics and began taking photographic portraits of many species. To observe certain small mammals more closely than his duties at the zoo would allow, he brought them into his home as pets.  Most of the photographs date from his term as assistant director.

Tarsier

Upon retiring from the National Zoo, Walker, along with his qualified assistants, compiled data, prepared photographs, and arranged a manuscript into what would become the three-volume Mammals of the World. Two of his other works are Walker’s Bats of the World and Walker’s Primates of the World, all of which are available at the NCSU Libraries. Information about the animals’ breeding, habitats, food, and physical description, along with a photograph or illustration, is included for all but four animals. Additionally, Walker wrote two books for the Animal Welfare Institute: First Aid and Care of Small Mammals and Studying Small Mammals.

South American Tapir

To learn more about Ernest Walker’s photographs, or about the Animal Welfare Institute Records, be sure to check out the collection guide.

The Hunt Library honored for public relations and interior design

The James B. Hunt Jr. Library at North Carolina State University has been recognized with two of the library profession’s most prestigious honors: a 2014 John Cotton Dana Library Public Relations Award and a 2014 ALA/IIDA Library Interior Design Award.

Sponsored by EBSCO, the H.W. Wilson Foundation, and the Library Leadership and Management Association (LLAMA), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), the John Cotton Dana Library Public Relations Award has been given annually since 1946 to celebrate excellence in library public relations. The communications to open the Hunt Library were recognized for creating “a bold, new campaign that helped the community imagine ‘The Library of the Future.’”  “The true star of this campaign,” the award concluded, “was the way the community told the story. Students were asked to imagine themselves in the space, and they took to the challenge wholeheartedly.”

Sponsored by the International Interior Design Association and the ALA, the Library Interior Design Award honors “excellence in aesthetics, design, creativity, function, and satisfaction of the client’s objectives.”  The Hunt Library was recognized as winner of the “Academic Libraries, Over 30,000 sq. ft.” category.  The Hunt Library’s lead designer was Snøhetta; its executive architects were Clark Nexsen; and Another Inside Job consulted on interior design.  Gwendolyn Emery—the NCSU Libraries’ Director of Library Environments—as well as other library staff, also played a significant role in envisioning and creating the interior of the building.

“Our intent with the interior design of the Hunt Library was to create inspiring spaces that would encourage inspiring work,” says Susan K. Nutter, Vice Provost and Director of the NCSU Libraries. “We, in turn, have been inspired by just how much our students and faculty appreciate this building, and we are grateful that the IIDA and ALA have honored us for the interior design that is so much a part of this building’s appeal.”

“We are also proud and delighted,” she concludes, “that the communications about the Hunt Library have been able to further ongoing and fruitful discussions about the future of academic libraries, the centers of the learning and research that make universities so productive for our communities.”

Among other awards and prizes, the Hunt Library has also been recently honored with the 2014 Stanford Prize for Innovation in Research Libraries (SPIRL).

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