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Changes to library access to limit disruptions around final exams

Tue, 2014-11-25 16:22

NC State students rely on the Libraries for quiet study space, particularly during final exams. To help ensure that we can meet this need, the NCSU Libraries is continuing changes put in place this summer to reduce disruptions during the critical times around finals.

At the Hunt Library

  • Access during reading days and finals will be limited to NC State students, faculty, and staff, who will need to use their Wolfpack One Cards to enter the Hunt Library security gates, December 4-16.
  • No tours, sightseeing, or events will be allowed between the last day of classes and the completion of final exams.

At the D. H. Hill Library

  • Tours and events will be limited around final exams, December 4-16
  • The Wolfpack One Card will continue to be required for access after 10:00 pm.

Study/meeting spaces in CVM TC corridor

Wed, 2014-11-19 15:26

Dear CVM Community

As spaces to meet and learn together are precious, and construction in the Veterinary Library begins November 28, we wanted to call your attention to the rooms in the sunny corridor connecting the main Administration building to the Health & Wellness Center. The first two rooms, TC 2591 and TC 2593, are included in the CVM room scheduling software under the Terry Center room listing.

TC corridor between the main Administration Building and the Health & Wellness Center

The remaining rooms in the hallway – TC 2594, 2595, 2596, 2597 – are for House Officers only and require a key.

We hope you find this information helpful. House Officers, Post-Docs, and Faculty also have swipe card access to the Faculty Research Commons on the 5th floor of Hunt Library. DVM students have swipe card access to the Graduate Student Commons on the 4th floor of the Hunt Library and the first floor Learning Commons of the D.H. Hill Library.

Donor Spotlight: Dr. Ricky and Kim Bloomfield

Wed, 2014-11-19 12:51

At 17, Dr. Ricky Bloomfield (’04) had pretty definite plans to attend a prestigious local private university. NC State only made it on his list as “backup school.” Until he visited.

The Park Scholarship he was offered was a significant draw, but it was really the sense of excitement and what he calls “the immersion in innovation” that he experienced on his brief trip to campus that set the direction for the rest of his life.

The Bloomfield family, Ricky and Kim,
with daughters Catherine and Miriam.

Just listing Ricky’s undergraduate majors and minors gives you some sense of what he cherished at NC State. There are four—Chemistry, Secondary Education, Saxophone Performance, and Spanish. He’s not one to be put in a box.

That ability to range wide and deep across disciplines led quickly not only to a medical degree, but to the successful iOS apps company he began while still in medical school. Soon he was engrossed in figuring out new ways that mobile applications could help transform the medical field, letting him, as he explains, “combine my passion taking care of patients one at a time with helping out patients millions at a time with medical technology.” Dr. Bloomfield is currently Director, Mobile Technology Strategy for Duke Health Technology Solutions, as well as Assistant Professor in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics at Duke University.

Ricky’s wife, Kim Bloomfield (‘02 in Chemistry and Textile Chemistry), first learned about the Hunt Library on a tour while she was president of the Park Scholars Alumni Society, back when the building was still under construction. “I got excited about it,” she says with some understatement, given the couple’s ongoing passionate support of the new space. “Knowing how much Ricky loves technology and how much I loved studying up in the stacks at D. H. Hill, it was something we became interested in supporting.”

“We are highly into education—and we have kids and want them to be excited about learning. It was a way that I could see getting my own children excited about NC State. And I was sure that the new iconic library would be a benefit to recruiting for the Park Scholarships.” Their two daughters, Ricky explains, will no doubt be NC State, Class of 2028.

“When the Hunt Library was announced, packed full of technology—which is no surprise given NC State’s talents, areas of focus, and research—it really intrigued me,” Ricky continues. “We found out more about it and felt it was something we wanted to get behind.” Right after the building opened, they decided to sponsor and name a student workstation on the building’s 4th floor.

Ricky explains their motivation: “we both went through the Park Scholars program, feel very fortunate in what we were given, and feel an obligation to give back to an institution that has given us so much. We want to see NC State continue to succeed, and the Hunt Library will serve as a rallying point for showcasing talent and innovation. For recruiting, there’s nothing better than taking prospective students to Hunt to show them what NC State can do and hint at the things that they themselves will do once they are here in proximity to all this innovation and technology. Giving back to something that will only make NC State stronger is a no-brainer.”

Their message to young graduates is especially clear. Laughing that they are probably “skewing the age profile of NC State donors down a little,” Kim explains that “we subscribe to the idea that what you spend your money on shows what you believe in. When we began giving to NC State, it wasn’t large amounts—Ricky was still in med school. Recent graduates are sometimes intimidated by hearing about endowed faculty positions or big gifts. But smaller donations made regularly can make a big difference, and they’re more feasible for younger alumni. Our own gifts are not huge, and they did stretch our budget to begin with. But we realized that we can make a huge difference even if we can’t yet endow a chair or name a wing in the library. If recent graduates start from a younger age, this can really make a difference for decades before they enter their golden years.”

As for their investment in the Hunt Library, both have been back many times since the space opened and both are happy, according to Ricky, that it is “living up to its promise as a space where you can let your creativity flow and combine the technologies in ways that are novel and interesting.”

Like their own lives, “things are just getting started. The best is most certainly yet to come.”

Faculty, it’s time for your Spring Reserve Requests

Wed, 2014-11-19 10:33

Reserve lists for DVM courses will be taken from the online course syllabus published as of  Monday, December 1st. Required and optional texts and library reserve titles will be entered in Reserves Direct, the Libraries’ online reserve management system.

If you need to put materials on reserve at the Vet Med Library for other courses, please give us a reserve list (or email it as an attachment to libraryvetmed@ncsu.edu) by Wednesday, December 3rd. To help us expedite your request, please specify the email subject as Spring Reserve Request.   In addition to your name and course name/number, provide complete citations (title, author, edition) for titles desired.

All personal materials (both books and media) listed on the syllabus or reserve lists should also be brought to the Library by Wednesday, December 3rd. For digital items to be placed on reserve, we will enter them in the system with a link to the full text.

For information on VML reserves services and the online reserve management system, go to http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/vetmed/services/reserves. If you need assistance or have questions, please contact Betsy Whitman at libraryvetmed@ncsu.edu or phone 919-513-6218.

Don’t Just Read . . .

Tue, 2014-11-18 15:20

Looking for an opportunity to discuss the latest popular books with some of the smartest people around (your friends and North Carolina State University’s most engaged scholars)?

NCSU Libraries and Wake County Public Libraries teamed up to make that easy with READ SMART, a series of informal discussions moderated by members of NC State’s faculty.

READ SMART is free and open to the public and is sponsored by Friends of the Library of North Carolina State University. All discussions are held at the Cameron Village Regional Library, 1930 Clark Avenue, Raleigh, NC 27605. For more information, please call 919-513-3481.

Upcoming programs:

Read Smart Book Discussion – Mom & Me & Mom by Maya Angelou

Thursday, November 20 at 7:00 p.m.

Cameron Village Regional Library, 1930 Clark Ave., Raleigh

Dr. Dorianne Laux, poet and professor of English at NC State, will moderate a discussion of Maya Angelou’s Mom & Me & Mom. In this New York Times bestselling memoir, Angelou portrays the triumphs and struggles of being the daughter of Vivian Baxter, a larger-than-life force in her Angelou’s life. Read Smart Book Discussion – Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant by Roz Chast

Thursday, December 11 at 7:00 p.m.

Cameron Village Regional Library, 1930 Clark Ave., Raleigh

Dr. Karen Bullock, associate professor and head of the Department of Social Work at NC State will discuss Chast’s illustrated chronicle of coping with her aging parents. Chast, a cartoonist for The New Yorker, is a finalist for the the National Book Award. Read Smart Book Discussion – Factory Man: how one furniture maker battled offshoring, stayed local–and helped save an American town by Beth Macy Thursday, January 15 at 7:00 p.m.

Cameron Village Regional Library, 1930 Clark Ave., Raleigh

Steven Walker, assistant director of NC State’s Furniture Manufacturing and Management Center will lead a discussion of Factory Man by Beth Macy. The New York Times says, “Macy’s passion and enthusiasm are palpable on every page.”

First 70 years of the Technician now online

Tue, 2014-11-18 14:53

As part of our mandate to preserve the history of North Carolina State University and distribute that history widely to scholars, alumni, and the public, the NCSU Libraries has made the first 70 years of the Technician, the university’s student newspaper, available online in a format that is easy to browse and search.

Since it began publishing on February 2, 1920, the Technician has been the school’s most powerful way for students to tell their own stories, to give their perspective on the issues of the times, to influence the direction of the university and the community, and—quite often—to tweak the nose of authority.

The 4000 issues from 1920 through 1990 that are digitized and indexed in the NCSU Libraries’ online collection open a valuable window for historians, social scientists, and others who study the history of NC State and the attitudes and accomplishments of this important slice of our population. They will also be a delight for NC State graduates, staff, and faculty who can now go online and relive their own times at the university—silly fashions, fads, serious issues, and all.

Visitors to vintage Technician issues can, for instance, explore a 1920 sketch of the proposed Bell Tower, enjoy a story on the doubling of the bleacher capacity in October 1921—“that glorious day in football history when N. C. State College will match her strength and skill against the aggregation from the University” at Chapel Hill—or see how the NC State community reacted to the 1970 killings at Kent State University as the Vietnam war divided a campus proud of its long-standing tradition of patriotism and support for the military.

Visits to the campus by John F. Kennedy (1960) and Ronald Reagan (1985) show the range of political interests and views on campus over time, and the yearly April Fools issues establish an enduring heritage of enthusiastic, irreverent, and impolitic student satire and humor.

The online issues of the Technician join a range of other online resources on NC State University history that are available through the NCSU Libraries’ Historical State, Rare & Unique Digital Collections, and Student Leadership websites.

Future plans call for adding issues from the years after 1990 to the Technician collection. To learn how to support this initiative or others from the NCSU Libraries, please visit www.lib.ncsu.edu/giving.

New Materials November 17

Mon, 2014-11-17 13:45
Laboratory manual for Laboratory procedures for veterinary technicians, sixth edition
Sirois, Margi, author. Large animal medicine for veterinary technicians Textbook of post-ICU medicine : the legacy of critical care Textbook for the veterinary assistant Dog food logic : making smart decisions for your dog in an age of too many choices
Case, Linda P. Livestock handling and transport From birdbrained to brilliant : training the sporting dog to be a great companion
Antoniak-Mitchell, Dawn, 1966- Frank Sabella’s art of handling show dogs
Sabella, Frank, author. North Carolina cattle reflections : connecting the past to the present
Brown, Katharine L., author. Lean-led hospital design : creating the efficient hospital of the future
Grunden, Naida. Small animal orthopedics, rheumatology, & musculoskeletal disorders : self-assessment color review The Social Dog : Behaviour and Cognition Aging horse : help your horse grow old with dignity and in health
Getty, Juliet M. Equine Cushing’s disease : nutritional management
Getty, Juliet M. The science and technology of dog training
O’Heare, James, 1971- author. Treating separation anxiety in dogs
DeMartini-Price, Malena, 1968- Laminitis : a scientific and realistic approach
Getty, Juliet M. Easy keeper : making it easy to keep him healthy
Getty, Juliet M. Whole foods & alternative feeds
Getty, Juliet M. Joint health : a nutritional perspective
Getty, Juliet M. Impacts of oil spill disasters on marine habitats and fisheries in North America Small animal critical care medicine

Six more individual study rooms coming soon to Vet Med Library

Tue, 2014-11-11 11:57

The College of Veterinary Medicine will be renovating the Veterinary Medicine Library to add 6 individual study rooms in the southeast corner. These rooms will be located south of the existing rooms, and will provide additional space for individual study, testing and video interviews. Each room will contain a PC computer with built-in camera and microphone and have acoustic wall treatment to reduce sound transmission between rooms.

Proposed floor plan.

The exact construction schedule is under negotiation, but we anticipate it will start on Friday, November 28 after DVM final exams and be completed in early January. Although we have requested that the loudest construction be completed in the evenings after 5pm, this project will cause some noise during daytime hours. Special care will be taken during DVM Selectives and Graduate Student finals to ensure a functional atmosphere until 5pm. We apologize for the inconvenience.

If you are scheduled to use Library spaces between November 26 – January 16 where noise would be a problem, we suggest you check whether other spaces might meet your needs. The Veterinary Library will be closed completely between December 24 (Wednesday)– January 2 (Friday). The James B. Hunt and D.H. Hill Libraries have open hours during the period in which Vet Med is closed.

If you have questions about the planned construction or using library resources during the winter break, please contact us at libraryvetmed@ncsu.edu or 919-513-6218. We hope you enjoy the new spaces when they become available in January.

VML Hours 11/15/14-12/1/14 during Pre-Finals, Finals, and the Thanksgiving Holiday

Mon, 2014-11-10 15:27

These are the Vet Med Library Pre-finals, Reading Day and Examination Hours, and Thanksgiving Holiday hours. Good luck with your exams!

  • November 15 (Saturday): 10:00am -7:00pm (Pre-finals start)
  • November 16 (Sunday) : 10:00am –10:00pm
  • November 17 – 19 (Monday-Wednesday) : 6:30am –  midnight
  • November 20 – 21 (Thursday-Friday) : 6:00am –  midnight (Finals start)
  • November 22 (Saturday) 6:00am – 7:00pm
  • November 23 (Sunday) : 10:00am – midnight
  • November 24-25 (Monday-Tuesday): 6:00am- midnight
  • November 26 (Wednesday) :  6:00am – 6:00pm
  • November 27 (Thursday): CLOSED HAPPY THANKSGIVING!!
  • November 28-30 (Friday – Sunday) : 1:00pm – 5:00m

Regular hours resume Monday, December 1st.

Longer hours are available at the D.H. Hill Library and James B. Hunt Library. See all NCSU Libraries Hours.

Hunt Library Centerpiece of “Prosperity” Award

Fri, 2014-11-07 10:24

Calling it “a smart library for the 21st century,” the Hunt Library was cited as a key factor in the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities’ choice to honor NC State’s Centennial Campus with its second annual Innovation and Economic Prosperity University award as one of the nation’s most innovative and productive economic engines.

October 2014 Publications from CVM Authors

Mon, 2014-11-03 13:20

October 2014 Publications from CVM Authors

Take a look at the CVM author publications for October 2014 courtesy of the NCSU Scholarly Publications Repository.

CVM and other NCSU authors are specifically highlighted with their department affiliation and links to their other publications in the repository. To access the full text of any of these articles, click on “Find Text (NCSU Only)” link.

If you have questions or would like information about the repository or NCSU publications, please email libraryvetmed@ncsu.edu or call us at 919-513-6218.

Help VML Prepare for Fall Selectives 2014

Fri, 2014-10-31 08:01

The Veterinary Medicine Library has began processing Fall Selectives reserve reading requests.  CVM Faculty needing to put print or online materials on reserve may submit a reading list (or email it as an attachment to libraryvetmed@ncsu.edu)  by Friday,  November 14th.  In addition to your name and course name/number, provide complete citations (title, author, and full call number) for books, chapters, or articles desired.

Faculty or their designees may also manage course reading lists through the Libraries’ reserve management system. Visit the reserves management system at https://reserves.lib.ncsu.edu/ where you can make your requests.

For additional information on VML Reserves services and quick access to the system, go to http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/vetmed/services/reserves. If you need assistance or have questions, please contact Betsy Whitman at eewhitma@ncsu.edu or phone 513-6218.

Leading the Pack exhibit explores how student leaders have shaped the NC State legacy

Mon, 2014-10-27 16:01

On November 3, the NCSU Libraries will open a major exhibit that tells the stories of how students are transformed into leaders at North Carolina State University.  In conjuction with the exhibit, the Libraries will also host a panel discussion during NC State’s Homecoming week that will feature five past student body presidents, including the first female who held this position; a former mayor of Raleigh; and the current senior class president.

Leading the Pack: Student Leaders at NC State explores a rich cultural tradition that encourages students to act on what they are learning.  This alchemy of participation and involvement has produced an unusually large number of citizens who began their lives of service to the university and to the wider community while students at NC State.

When Abraham Lincoln signed the legislation that created land-grant institutions like NC State, he not only created a practical way to make higher education available to motivated, ambitious people who did not have access to the elite private schools of the time; his bold but practical move also provided a perfect model for how real leaders should think deeply about the problems in front of them and then act to solve them.

Transformative leadership was present at NC State’s land grant founding.  And ever since, NC State students have been picking up the tools they discovered on campus and setting out to change the world.  Immersed while on campus in an ethic that asks them to do nothing less than solve global challenges, each generation has left to shape the future in fields as diverse as engineering, public policy, agriculture, defense, design, humanitarian work, medicine, journalism, and business.

Leading the Pack examines that culture of leadership at NC State and follows the stories of those who immersed themselves in student government, student media, ROTC, Greek life, and service projects—or just followed their own geniuses—and learned the skills that later let them serve as the state’s youngest and most re-elected governor, or lead the nation’s military, or establish a non-profit that battles the water-borne illnesses that kill a child every 21 seconds.

Leading the Pack draws on the rich trove of materials collected by the NCSU Libraries’ Student Leadership Initiative.  This ongoing, multi-year program has chronicled the experiences and impact of former student leaders through the collection of hundreds of video oral histories, biographical essays, and digitized images.

During the week of NC State’s Homecoming, the NCSU Libraries will also host a panel discussion of current and past student leaders to explore how NC State fosters leadership and challenges students to make positive change.  The panel will be moderated by Tony Caravano, Student Body President from 2003 to 2005, and will include:

  • Superior Court Judge Ron Spivey, Student Body President, 1981-1982
  • Kelly Hook, Student Body President, 2010-2011
  • Kate Sterling, the first female Student Body President, 1970-1971
  • Smedes York, former NC State basketball player and former mayor of Raleigh
  • Harold Pettigrew, Student Body President, 2000-2001
  • Molly Basdeo, current Senior Class President

The panel discussion will be held on November 6 at 4 p. m. in the Mountains Ballroom at the Talley Student Center.

Both the exhibit and the panel discussion are open and free to the public.  The exhibit may be visited during regular library hours in the D. H. Hill Library’s Exhibit Gallery through the spring of 2015.

Vet Med Library Reduced Hours Oct 20-25 (CVM Fall Break)

Mon, 2014-10-13 10:36

The Veterinary Medicine Library has reduced hours during the College of Veterinary Medicine’s Fall Break:

  • October 20-24 (Monday – Friday): 7:30am – 6:00pm
  • October 25 (Saturday) : 1:00pm  – 5:00pm
  • October 26 (Sunday) : 11:00am – 10:00pm  (Regular hours resume)

Note the North Carolina State Fair is October 16-26; more info at NC State Fair.

Longer hours are available at the D.H. Hill Library and James B. Hunt Library–see all hours at NCSU Libraries Hours.

Celebrate National Veterinary Technicians Week (10/12-18)

Mon, 2014-10-13 10:32

The Veterinary Medicine Library honors veterinary technicians and their tremendous contributions to care during National Veterinary Technicians Week. Pets and Vets need Techs! Check out our selection of veterinary technician-focused titles on display during October at the Veterinary Medicine Library.

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