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VML opening at 11am on Sat 8/9 for visitors prior to White Coat Ceremony

VetMed News - Tue, 2014-07-29 14:19

The Veterinary Medicine Library will extend its hours on Saturday, August 9 to welcome the friends and family of the members of the Class of 2018 who may be visiting the College of Veterinary Medicine prior to the White Coat Ceremony. The White Coat Ceremony in which the Class of 2018 is formally inducted into the veterinary profession takes place at the Jane S. McKimmon Center at 3:00pm.

Library hours that weekend are:

August 9  (Saturday) : 11:00am – 5:00pm

August 10 (Sunday) : 1:00pm – 5:00pm (Regular Hours)

Longer hours are available at the D.H. Hill Library and James B. Hunt Library –see www.lib.ncsu.edu/hours for all NCSU Libraries Hours.

VML Closing at 6pm Mon 8/4 – Fri 8/8 (Intersession), VML hours on Sat 8/9

VetMed News - Tue, 2014-07-29 14:15

Veterinary Medicine Library operating hours are reduced during the University Semester Intersession:

August 4 – August 8  (Monday – Friday) : 7:30am – 6:00pm
August 9 (Saturday) : 11:00am – 5:00pm

Longer hours are available at the D.H. Hill Library and James B. Hunt Library–see www.lib.ncsu.edu/hours for all NCSU Libraries Hours.

Fabulous Faculty Book Talk 9/4 – Dr. Barbara Sherman and “Decoding Your Dog

VetMed News - Tue, 2014-07-29 08:38

When: September 4, 2014, 7:00pm
Where: The North Theater in College of Veterinary Medicine (Directions to CVM). Come to Main CVM Entrance.

Dr. Barbara Sherman, clinical professor of veterinary behavior at NC State’s College of Veterinary Medicine, will help you better understand your dog’s cues and behavior.

A graduate of The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine with a doctorate in Animal Behavior from UNC-Chapel Hill, Dr. Sherman teaches animal behavior to veterinary students and directs the clinical behavior residency training program. Her ongoing research focuses on reducing anxiety in dogs and cats using pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic methods, and behavioral screening of military working dogs to optimize their performance and welfare.

Sherman, past president of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists (ACVB), wrote the preface to the recently published Decoding Your Dog, which will be available on-site for purchase.

Contact Info: Marian Fragola | 919-513-3481 | marian_fragola@ncsu.edu

Admission Info: Free and open to the public.

More Info: This program is part of the NCSU Libraries’ Fabulous Faculty series.

The Farm at Black Mountain College: A Hunt Library Happening

Join David Silver, Visiting Scholar at the NCSU Libraries, for a multimedia happening that chronicles the rise and fall of Black Mountain College, founded in 1933 near Asheville, North Carolina. There will be two performances on Monday, August 4. The morning performance will start at 10:30 a.m. and conclude at noon. The evening performance will start at 7 p.m. and conclude at 8:30 p.m. Both performances will start at the Hunt Library iPearl Immersion Theater.

Education practitioners can still learn from what worked and what didn’t work at Black Mountain College, especially here at NC State where several of the College’s principles are still at work. Focusing on the Black Mountain College farm and work program, Silver will lead an exploration of the College’s lesser-known but vitally important participants. David Silver is associate professor of media studies, environmental studies, and urban agriculture at University of San Francisco.

Using the entire Hunt Library as a storytelling building and featuring never-before-seen photographs, this dynamic event will examine the most experimental college in American history. Silver will employ an unconventional storytelling approach that unfolds as participants walk through the building.

Free and open to the public. Presented by the NCSU Libraries. For more information contact Mike Nutt at mrnutt@ncsu.edu.

The Farm at Black Mountain College: A Hunt Library Happening

NCSU Libraries News - Mon, 2014-07-28 08:54

Join David Silver, Visiting Scholar at the NCSU Libraries, for a multimedia happening that chronicles the rise and fall of Black Mountain College, founded in 1933 near Asheville, North Carolina. There will be two performances on Monday, August 4. The morning performance will start at 10:30 a.m. and conclude at noon. The evening performance will start at 7 p.m. and conclude at 8:30 p.m. Both performances will start at the Hunt Library iPearl Immersion Theater.

Education practitioners can still learn from what worked and what didn’t work at Black Mountain College, especially here at NC State where several of the College’s principles are still at work. Focusing on the Black Mountain College farm and work program, Silver will lead an exploration of the College’s lesser-known but vitally important participants. David Silver is associate professor of media studies, environmental studies, and urban agriculture at University of San Francisco.

Using the entire Hunt Library as a storytelling building and featuring never-before-seen photographs, this dynamic event will examine the most experimental college in American history. Silver will employ an unconventional storytelling approach that unfolds as participants walk through the building.

Free and open to the public. Presented by the NCSU Libraries. For more information contact Mike Nutt at mrnutt@ncsu.edu.

North Carolina State University Student Center Records

SCRC News - Mon, 2014-07-21 08:00

NCSU Libraries’ Special Collections Research Center is happy to announce that the University Student Center Records are now processed and available for research. The collection contains files and other items related to the general administrative and departmental transactions of the Student Center, as well as materials from the production and promotion of its events, services, and activities.

One of the most interesting parts of the of the collection is the scrapbooks, made yearly between 1953 to 1964 to commemorate the events and activities related to and occurring at the Student Center, and are filled with newspaper clippings, programs from events, and promotional materials such as posters and flyers. However, as is the case with most scrapbooks their age, the adhesive has wasted away, so many of the items glued or taped to the pages have become loose. During the processing of the scrapbooks, an attempt was made to replicate the original layout of each page so they could be photographed before the loose items were filed separately.

The records range from 1941 to 2008 and reflect the history of the University Student Center, as well as how it functions today. The Student Center is a student organization established to give students and other community members a centralized location on campus which provides essential facilities, programs, and services. It was established with the purpose of enriching students’ lives by teaching them social and recreational skills, and to provide them with the opportunity of extracurricular activity without having to leave campus.

The earliest model of a student center on N C State’s (then, State College’s) campus was the King Religious Center (also called the YMCA Building), which opened in 1913. Taking note of the success of student unions on other college campuses, N C State took the initiative to create their own, starting in 1948. The first official student union was founded in 1951 and later named the Erdahl-Cloyd Student Union. In 1972, the newly built Talley Student Union replaced the Erdahl-Cloyd Union. Today, the College’s student center is actually the University Student Centers, consisting of Talley, the Witherspoon Student Center, the Price Music Center, and Thompson Hall.

In addition to providing students with social and recreational opportunities on campus, the Student Center organization has always offered a number of other services. It is the host of programs for academic and professional development, as well as being renowned as a performance venue since it was established, providing theater and music showings, film screenings, and forum discussions.

The University Student Center Records show how the Center has changed, but it still provides the services for which it was established. For more information about the collection, please consult the collection guide.

Exciting Photo Album Discovery!

SCRC News - Mon, 2014-07-14 11:23

Hand-colored albumen prints by Kusakabe Kimbei, showing Tokyo gardens, ca. 1890

The Special Collection Research Center has made an exciting discovery about a photograph album in its collection.  The album contains approximately 60 hand-colored albumen prints showing landscapes and architectural scenes in Japan during the late nineteenth century.  The dimensions of the photographs are 21.5 x 28 cm (8.5 x 11 in).  The album covers are lacquer with inlaid designs.    Many photos have printed captions and numbers, but there is no indication as to who created them or the album.  We have recently been able to attribute the album to Kusakabe Kimbei.  A further description exists in the library’s online catalog.

Kusakabe Kimbei was a commercial photographer based in Yokohama, Japan, in the late nineteenth century, and he was one of the great native-born Japanese photographers of his time.  He had been an apprentice of Baron Raimund von Stillfried, an Austrian who established a photographic studio in Japan in 1871.  When Stillfried left Japan in 1885, Kusakabe bought his mentor’s stock and initiated his own studio, which existed until 1912.

Stillfried’s firm had purchased the stock of Felice (or Felix) Beato in 1877.  Beato was an Italian-born photographer who established a studio in Japan during the mid-1860s and was one of the first Westerners to bring photography to the East Asian country.  He employed Japanese artists to color his albumen prints, and he became knowledgeable of such Japanese art traditions as ukiyo-e woodblock prints.  Both Stillfried and Beato specialized in studio portraits and genre scenes.  Beato also specialized in landscape photographs.  Westerners fascinated by Eastern cultures formed the major audience for their work.  Kusakabe continued these traditions, perfecting the psychological portrait, and he seems to have catered to the same audience.

Hand-colored albumen prints by Kusakabe Kimbei, showing Choin-in Temple, ca. 1890

Hand-tinting of albumen photographic prints became a minor art form in Japan in the late nineteenth century.  Japanese artists have had long traditions of coloring through fabric stenciling and woodblock printing.  The transfer of these processes to photography resulted in works that have rivaled Western examples in skill and beauty.  Because of the time-consuming process, a master colorist could finish only 2-3 prints per day, so Japanese photography studios drew upon the skills of large staffs.

The NCSU Libraries has held this particular photograph album for several years, probably decades, but its origins had become lost until recently.  While perusing the catalog of a rare book dealer, Special Collections staff found a description for another nineteenth century Japanese album with Kusakabe photographs.  Through online research, the staff was able to match two photos in the NCSU Libraries’ album with those in known Kusakabe collections, including one at the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives in Washington, D.C.  Research in print publications, including Japan Photographs, 1854-1905 (1979) by Clark Worswick and The History of Japanese Photography (2003) by and Anne Tucker, et al., also confirmed Kusakabe as the creator of some of these photos.  Therefore, it is assumed that the entire NCSU Libraries’ album can be attributed to Kusakabe.  One interesting aspect of the NCSU Libraries’ album is that it does not include any of the psychological portraits for which Kusakabe is now known.  Rather, it only contains landscape and architectural scenes.

Front cover of photo album by Kusakabe Kimbei, ca. 1890

Back cover of photograph album by Kusakabe Kimbei, ca. 1890

A bookplate on the inside cover of the album indicates it was donated by William T. Huxter.    A William T. “Bill” Huxter was at NC State from the 1960s to the 1990s as a professor and extension specialist, first in Wood Products Extension and later in Extension Forestry.

If anyone knows more about the donation of this album, please contact the Special Collections Research Center.  Interested researchers wanting to schedule a time to access the photo album may contact the Special Collections Research Center through the online form.

Have you “Kugged” your Kaypro today?

SCRC News - Mon, 2014-07-07 13:33

The Special Collections Research Center includes the History of Computing and Simulation as one of its key collecting areas. We recently received a small collection, the Lawrence Auld Collection of Kaypro Computer Materials, 1978-1992, that documents the Kaypro home computer. Kaypro began as “Non-Linear Systems,” a maker of electronic test equipment, and was founded by Andrew Kay in 1952. In 1982, Non-Linear Systems organized a company called the Kaypro Corporation and named its first product the Kaypro II. During the 1980s, Kaypros were in competition with IBM PCs and Apple II computers. Fun trivia fact: Arthur C. Clarke used the Kaypro II (64 Kb of RAM!) to write his 1982 novel 2010: Odyssey Two.

The bumper sticker shown above, “Have you kugged your Kaypro today?,” is a play on the “Kaypro Users Group” (KUG). This collection includes various materials that document the use of Kaypros and the discussions about them which were raised by the user community. Included are issues of ProFiles: The Magazine for Kaypro Users, and another popular magazine that catered to Kaypro users, Micro Cornucopia. Perhaps most interesting are Kaypro newsletters and bulletins from the 1980s as well as various user’s guides and user discussions. Although the collection has not yet received full archival processing, a preliminary inventory is available. The collection is open to researchers here at the Special Collections Research Center.

New Materials July 7

VetMed News - Mon, 2014-07-07 10:16

Congratulations to Betsy Whitman on Libraries’ Pride of the Wolfpack Award

VetMed News - Tue, 2014-07-01 17:01

The Veterinary Medicine Library Team is proud to announce that Betsy Whitman was one of the Libraries’ recipients of the Pride of the Wolfpack award at the Libraries’ Annual Service and Awards Program on June 19, 2014.

Please join us in congratulating Betsy for her efforts on behalf of the Wolfpack!!

Betsy Whitman, Pride of the Wolfpack Winner, with Kris Alpi. Photo by Carol Vreelend.

Wall Street Journal: Hunt Library helps inspire New York Public Library renovation

Citing the need for inspiring “collaborative spaces, stocked with tools for creative projects,” the New York Public Library looks to the Hunt Library for the planned renovation of its landmark Fifth Avenue building.

June 2014 Publications from CVM Authors

VetMed News - Tue, 2014-07-01 09:47

June 2014 Publications from CVM Authors

Take a look at the CVM author publications for June 2014 courtesy of the NCSU Scholarly Publications Repository.

CVM and other NCSU authors are specifically highlighted with their department affiliation and links to their other publications in the repository. To access the full text of any of these articles, click on “Find Text (NCSU Only)” link.

If you have questions or would like information about the repository or NCSU publications, please email libraryvetmed@ncsu.edu or call us at 919-513-6218.

Testing Code, Discovering Collections

SCRC News - Mon, 2014-06-30 16:31

Years ago, we decided, rather than using an out-of-the box solution, to roll our own for the Rare and Unique Digital Collections site. Doing this gives us greater control in creating the user experience; a greater ability to respond to bugs and feature requests, i.e., let’s add “related images” on the resource page; and a way to architect the application so that it fit the Libraries’ approach to managing digital collections. What it also means, though, is that we’re in charge of maintaining the application.

We’re currently using Blacklight and Solr for search and faceted browse, and the djatoka JPEG2000 image server delivers our images.

Recently, we went through two significant upgrades with the site. Project Blacklight released Version 5.4.0 in May 2014, and we migrated to this version in anticipation of some very significant new features to the site we’ll be working on over the summer. The latest release of Blacklight itself includes an upgraded version of Bootstrap, which helps to make websites responsive, i.e., sized appropriately for the screen size one is viewing the site on. In performing this upgrade, we also migrated the site to Rails 4.1 (a web framework), which was released in April 2014.

When performing upgrades, we release code to a staging site, where we can review the code’s effects. This is no small affair. We review the site in several web browsers (Chrome, Firefox, Safari, IE), as several viewing sizes (extra large desktop down to phone size), and on several different devices (Mac, Windows, and Linux operating systems; all of the iOS devices (iPhone, iPad, iPod); and several Android devices). And, since we’ve made the site available under HTTP Secure, we have to the view the site on http and https. When viewing the site on all of these devices and browsers, we test to make sure that: the site looks right, the facets work, all the buttons are placed properly and function correctly, the site navigation is functioning, the six different resource views (text, images, folders, video, etc.) are functioning properly, the image pan and zoom is working, the map and “now” features work, and audio and video play properly. These are the biggies; there are probably another dozen or so features we double-check for proper functionality.

But, it’s not all work. Well, it really is, but…we do end up stumbling upon interesting resources that are new to us or new again that make it feel less like work.

While it is possible to visit the site without coming across, by far our most viewed resource, it just doesn’t feel like a visit without doing so. Since beginning to track web statistics on our site with Google Analytics in October 2012, this image has been viewed over 23,000 times.

Here’s one I’d never seen before. It’s a busload of basketball players and fans in the Philippines, one of whom is playing a nose flute.

Like any major university, NC State has hosted presidents and figures of state. In this latest round of testing, I re-discovered a photograph of Bill Clinton receiving students, but the real focus of this one is Hilary. An all-time favorite.

I’ve seen this one in results set a million times, but for some reason I never paid it much mind. On further examination–I looked at this particular resource in order to check that pagination was working–it’s a really fascinating speech, as well as topic.

And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. I think this brief list of discoveries, in itself, is a great testament to the nature of our collections and the fact that the site supports serendipitous discovery.

These resources–and much, much more–are all available as part of the NCSU Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to thousands of images, video, and audio recordings, and text documenting NC State history.

Faculty – It’s Time for Fall Reserve Requests

VetMed News - Mon, 2014-06-30 10:39

Reserve lists for DVM courses will be taken from each faculty’s online course syllabus published as of Friday, August 1. Required (and optional) texts and library reserve titles will be entered in Reserves Direct, the Libraries’ online reserve management system.

If you need to put materials on reserve for other courses, please give us a reserve list (or email it as an attachment to libraryvetmed@ncsu.edu) by 10 AM on Friday, August 1.  In addition to your name and course name/number, provide complete citations (title, author, edition) for titles desired.

All personal materials (both books and media) listed on the syllabus or reserve lists should also be brought to the Library by 10 AM on Friday, August 1.

For information on VML reserves services and the online reserve management system, go to http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/vetmed/services/reserves. If you need assistance or have questions, please contact Betsy Whitman at eewhitma@ncsu.edu or phone 919-513-6218.

Vet Med Library closed Friday, July 4

VetMed News - Mon, 2014-06-30 10:34

The Veterinary Medicine Library will be closed on Friday, July 4th for the holiday and will resume regular hours on Saturday, July 5 from 1:00pm – 5:00pm.
Enjoy your 4th of July Holiday!!

The D. H. Hill Library and James B. Hunt Library will be open on July 4 from 7:00am – 6:00pm.

See  http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/hours for all NCSU Libraries Hours.

Gateway Veterinary Camp highlighted in Rocky Mount Telegram

VetMed News - Tue, 2014-06-24 16:58

The 35 campers participating in the 2014 Gateway Veterinary Camp visited the Veterinary Medicine Library of the NCSU Libraries as part of their tour of the College of Veterinary Medicine last week. Read more about Vet Camp in the Rocky Mount Telegram at
https://www.rockymounttelegram.com/news/youth-camp-promotes-veterinary-careers-2512969. The Veterinary Medicine Library welcomes all students interested in animal health. For more on visiting us and using resources onsite in the Library, see http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/vetmed/about/location.

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