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June 2015 Publications from CVM Authors

VetMed News - Thu, 2015-07-02 13:18

June 2015 Publications from CVM Authors
Take a look at the CVM author publications for June 2015 courtesy of the NCSU Scholarly Publications Repository.
CVM and other NCSU authors are specifically highlighted with their department affiliation and links to their other publications in the repository. To access the full text of any of these articles, click on “Find Text (NCSU Only)” link.
If you have questions or would like information about the repository or NCSU publications, please email libraryvetmed@ncsu.edu or call us at 919-513-6218.

Faculty – It’s Time for Fall Reserve Requests

VetMed News - Tue, 2015-06-30 14:20

Reserve lists for DVM courses will be taken from each faculty’s online course syllabus published as of Monday, August 3. Required (and optional) texts and library reserve titles will be entered in Reserves Direct, the Libraries’ online reserve management system.

If you need to put materials on reserve for other courses, please give us a reserve list (or email it as an attachment to libraryvetmed@ncsu.edu) by 10 AM on Monday, August 3.  In addition to your name and course name/number, provide complete citations (title, author, edition) for titles desired.

All personal materials (both books and media) listed on the syllabus or reserve lists should also be brought to the Library by 10 AM on Monday, August 3.

For information on VML reserves services and the online reserve management system, go to http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/vetmed/services/reserves. If you need assistance or have questions, please contact Betsy Whitman at eewhitma@ncsu.edu or phone 919-513-6218.

NCSU Libraries to Receive Phil Freelon’s Architectural Papers

Design Library News - Fri, 2015-06-26 10:38

Because the College of Design played such a critical role in his early development as an architect, Phil Freelon has chosen the NCSU Libraries as the home for his architectural archive: “I am proud to be a member of the NC State family,” Freelon noted, “and it is an honor to be recognized in this way.” Freelon has donated  his architectural records from his earliest years as a practitioner and plans to add to his archive in the future.

In addition to being a student in the College of Design in the 70’s, Freelon has taught at the College, served on its Design Guild/Design Life Board, the Board of Visitors, and the Board of Trustees. He has designed several buildings on campus, including the Partners III Lab Building on Centennial Campus and the new Gregg Museum addition, currently under construction.

Freelon is the founder and President of The Freelon Group, Inc.  His work has been published in national professional journals including Architecture, Progressive Architecture, Architectural Record, and Contract Magazine, where he was named Designer of the Year for 2008.

Metropolis and Metropolitan Home magazines and the New York Times have also featured Freelon and his firm.  His furniture design has been recognized nationally,  including first prize in the PPG Furniture Design Competition and design contract work with Herman Miller.

A native of Philadelphia, PA, Freelon earned his Bachelor of Environmental Design degree in Architecture from North Carolina State University and his Master of Architecture degree from MIT.  He then received a Loeb Fellowship and spent a year of independent study at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design.

Freelon went on to serve as an adjunct faculty member at North Carolina State University’s College of Design and has been a visiting critic/lecturer at Harvard, MIT, the University of Maryland, Syracuse University, Auburn University, the University of Utah, the California College of the Arts, Kent State University and the New Jersey Institute of Technology, among others.  He is currently on the faculty at MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning.

Freelon is a Peer Professional for the GSA’s Design Excellence Program and has served on numerous design award juries, including the National AIA Institute Honor Awards jury and the National Endowment for the Arts Design Stewardship Panel. He is also a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, a LEED Accredited Professional, and the 2009 recipient of the AIA Thomas Jefferson Award for Public Architecture.

Appointed in 2011 by President Barack Obama to the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts, Freelon is part of the team leading the design for the Smithsonian’s new National Museum of African American History and Culture and is a preeminent architectural designer of museums featuring African-American history, including the Center for Civil & Human Rights in Atlanta and the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco.

NCSU Libraries to Receive Phil Freelon’s Architectural Papers

NRL News - Thu, 2015-06-25 12:02

Because the College of Design played such a critical role in his early development as an architect, Phil Freelon has chosen the NCSU Libraries as the home for his architectural archive: “I am proud to be a member of the NC State family,” Freelon noted, “and it is an honor to be recognized in this way.” Freelon has donated  his architectural records from his earliest years as a practitioner and plans to add to his archive in the future.

In addition to being a student in the College of Design in the 70’s, Freelon has taught at the College, served on its Design Guild/Design Life Board, the Board of Visitors, and the Board of Trustees. He has designed several buildings on campus, including the Partners III Lab Building on Centennial Campus and the new Gregg Museum addition, currently under construction.

Freelon is the founder and President of The Freelon Group, Inc.  His work has been published in national professional journals including Architecture, Progressive Architecture, Architectural Record, and Contract Magazine, where he was named Designer of the Year for 2008.

Metropolis and Metropolitan Home magazines and the New York Times have also featured Freelon and his firm.  His furniture design has been recognized nationally,  including first prize in the PPG Furniture Design Competition and design contract work with Herman Miller.

A native of Philadelphia, PA, Freelon earned his Bachelor of Environmental Design degree in Architecture from North Carolina State University and his Master of Architecture degree from MIT.  He then received a Loeb Fellowship and spent a year of independent study at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design.  Freelon went on to serve as an adjunct faculty member at North Carolina State University’s College of Design and has been a visiting critic/lecturer at Harvard, MIT, the University of Maryland, Syracuse University, Auburn University, the University of Utah, the California College of the Arts, Kent State University and the New Jersey Institute of Technology, among others.  He is currently on the faculty at MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning.

Freelon is a Peer Professional for the GSA’s Design Excellence Program and has served on numerous design award juries, including the National AIA Institute Honor Awards jury and the National Endowment for the Arts Design Stewardship Panel. He is also a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, a LEED Accredited Professional, and the 2009 recipient of the AIA Thomas Jefferson Award for Public Architecture.

Appointed in 2011 by President Barack Obama to the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts, Freelon is part of the team leading the design for the Smithsonian’s new National Museum of African American History and Culture and is a preeminent architectural designer of museums featuring African-American history, including the Center for Civil & Human Rights in Atlanta and the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco.

Vet Med Library closed Friday and Saturday, July 3-4

VetMed News - Thu, 2015-06-25 09:00

The Veterinary Medicine Library will be closed on Friday, July 3rd and Saturday, July 4th for the holiday and will resume regular hours on Sunday, July 5 from 1:00pm – 5:00pm.
Enjoy your 4th of July Holiday!!

The D. H. Hill Library and James B. Hunt Library will be open from 7am-6pm on July 3rd and 9am-6pm on July 4th.

See  http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/hours for all NCSU Libraries Hours.

New Materials June 22

VetMed News - Mon, 2015-06-22 14:17
Seizures in dogs and cats
Sanders, Sean, author. Essential biomaterials science
Williams, D. F. (David Franklyn), author.

Large Design Drawings: Special Handling Required

Design Library News - Mon, 2015-06-22 10:19

Arcade Building for E. W. Grove by Charles N. Parker, Architect, Asheville, N.C., 15 July 1926

Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Design is a significant collecting area for the Special Collections Research Center, as well as an area of excellence at the university and a corresponding strength within the NCSU Libraries’ overall collection. Including papers, drawings, and records of prominent architects, landscape architects, and greenways planners in North Carolina and the southeastern United States, with an emphasis on major modernists, as well as collections documenting the historic architecture of North Carolina, industrial design and graphic design, these collections contain much material that is large or fragile or beautiful or all of the above. Thus, they require special arrangements for storage and transportation.

The beauty of architectural collections is often hidden when they first arrive. If the architect stopped practicing or the firm went out of business years before we receive the collection, then the material may have been stored in less than ideal conditions and may no longer be organized as it was when it was regularly used.

To preserve architectural drawings, we store them either rolled or flat in acid-free enclosures. Rolled drawings are rolled on acid-free cores and wrapped in acid-free paper. Flat drawings are stored in acid-free folders in metal flat files with baked epoxy finishes.

Storage for rolled drawings.

Flat storage for architectural drawings.

Because of their size, we need special equipment to transport architectural drawings. To move either rolled or flat drawings within one building, we use this cart with a top constructed for us by our Building Services Department:

Cart for moving architectural drawings.

To move drawings from our off-site storage facility to our Reading Room in the main library in order for users to see them, we use a variety of cases, including these:

Case to transport rolled drawings.

Cases to transport flat drawings.

For information about our collections in the areas of Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Design, please consult our website.

The Founding of the Farm at Black Mountain College

NRL News - Thu, 2015-06-18 09:33

Students working on the Black Mountain College farm

The farm at Black Mountain College was a remarkable achievement. Student-initiated and largely student-led, the farm was conceived in fall 1933, debated throughout winter, and launched in spring 1934. Building on his well-received program at the Hunt Library last summer, David Silver, visiting scholar at the NCSU Libraries, is back to discuss the origins of the farm at Black Mountain College and share his recent research that dispels some often-held misconceptions about both the farm and the College itself.

Using the Hunt Library’s high resolution visualization spaces as well as materials from the NCSU Libraries Special Collections Research Center, Silver will bring never-before-seen photographs and his electric presentation style to this interactive discussion of the genesis of the most significant art college in America’s history. Silver is an associate professor of media studies, environmental studies, and urban agriculture at the University of San Francisco.

There will be two presentations on Tuesday June 30, 2015: one at 10:30am and one at 7pm. Both presentations begin on the Commons Wall stairs between levels 3 and 4. Following the program, attendees are invited to join Professor Silver for refreshments and discussion in the Hunt Library’s Collaboration Hub (Level 5).

Free and open to the public. Presented by the NCSU Libraries. For more information contact Mike Nutt at mrnutt@ncsu.edu. For information about directions and parking, visit lib.ncsu.edu/parking.

The Founding of the Farm at Black Mountain College

Students working on the Black Mountain College farm

The farm at Black Mountain College was a remarkable achievement. Student-initiated and largely student-led, the farm was conceived in fall 1933, debated throughout winter, and launched in spring 1934. Building on his well-received program at the Hunt Library last summer, David Silver, visiting scholar at the NCSU Libraries, is back to discuss the origins of the farm at Black Mountain College and share his recent research that dispels some often-held misconceptions about both the farm and the College itself.

Using the Hunt Library’s high resolution visualization spaces as well as materials from the NCSU Libraries Special Collections Research Center, Silver will bring never-before-seen photographs and his electric presentation style to this interactive discussion of the genesis of the most significant art college in America’s history. Silver is an associate professor of media studies, environmental studies, and urban agriculture at the University of San Francisco.

There will be two presentations on Tuesday June 30, 2015: one at 10:30am and one at 7pm. Both presentations begin in the Teaching and Visualization Lab on Level 4. Following the program, attendees are invited to join Professor Silver for refreshments and discussion in the Hunt Library’s Collaboration Hub (Level 5).

Free and open to the public. Presented by the NCSU Libraries. For more information contact Mike Nutt at mrnutt@ncsu.edu. For information about directions and parking, visit lib.ncsu.edu/parking.

NCSU Libraries Launches New Makerspace

NRL News - Tue, 2015-06-16 10:47

As part of President Obama’s National Week of Making, the NCSU Libraries is opening their
Makerspace in D. H. Hill Library on Tuesday,
June 16.

The Makerspace will offer a hands-on, do-it-yourself space where users are encouraged to experiment and learn new hardware and software skills. It will be equipped with 3D printers, a laser cutter, electronics prototyping tools, sewing machines, and general tools for making, and will be accessible to all NC State students, faculty, and staff.

While typically available for open use, faculty integrating maker tools into their curriculum will
be able to reserve the Makerspace for classes, and the Libraries will use the space to hold
workshops featuring particular tools and techniques.

The Libraries hopes the D. H. Hill Makerspace will serve as a hub for making on campus—a place to expose the NC State community to making and its corresponding emerging literacies. To compliment their expertise with maker tools and techniques, the NCSU Libraries staff has expertise in disciplinary research, industry and market research, patent searching and filing, digital product development, data management, all of which can enrich a maker’s approach. The Libraries is committed to bringing critical thinking to the maker experience and technology literacy.

With the D. H. Hill Makerspace, the Libraries
have added yet another innovative learning space and equipped it with an extensive set of maker
technologies: MakerBot and LulzBot 3D
printers; Arduino, Galileo, and Raspberry Pi
electronics prototyping platforms; Bernina
sewing machines; an Epilog laser cutter, and
an electronics workstation with Hakko
soldering iron. The space also offers a
“tinkering table” for drop-in users, featuring
hands-on making tools like LittleBits,
3Doodlers, LEGOS, and MaKey MaKeys.
These interactive experiences will help stir
users’ creative thinking and get them making
on their first visit.

NCSU Libraries Launches New Makerspace

Design Library News - Tue, 2015-06-16 10:47

As part of President Obama’s National Week of Making, the NCSU Libraries is opening their Makerspace in D. H. Hill Library on Tuesday, June 16.

The Makerspace will offer a hands-on, do-it-yourself space where users are encouraged to experiment and learn new hardware and software skills. It will be equipped with 3D printers, a laser cutter, electronics prototyping tools, sewing machines, and general tools for making, and will be accessible to all NC State students, faculty, and staff.

While typically available for open use, faculty integrating maker tools into their curriculum will be able to reserve the Makerspace for classes, and the Libraries will use the space to hold workshops featuring particular tools and techniques.

The Libraries hopes the D. H. Hill Makerspace will serve as a hub for making on campus—a place to expose the NC State community to making and its corresponding emerging literacies. To compliment their expertise with maker tools and techniques, the NCSU Libraries staff has expertise in disciplinary research, industry and market research, patent searching and filing, digital product development, data management, all of which can enrich a maker’s approach. The Libraries is committed to bringing critical thinking to the maker experience and technology literacy.

With the D. H. Hill Makerspace, the Libraries have added yet another innovative learning space and equipped it with an extensive set of maker technologies: MakerBot and LulzBot 3D printers; Arduino, Galileo, and Raspberry Pi electronics prototyping platforms; Bernina sewing machines; an Epilog laser cutter, and an electronics workstation with Hakko soldering iron. The space also offers a “tinkering table” for drop-in users, featuring hands-on making tools like LittleBits, 3Doodlers, LEGOS, and MaKey MaKeys. These interactive experiences will help stir users’ creative thinking and get them making on their first visit.

New Materials June 15

VetMed News - Mon, 2015-06-15 15:20

NCSU Libraries Goes to Washington for First Capitol Maker Faire

NRL News - Thu, 2015-06-11 10:59

NCSU Libraries’ own Adam Rogers and Dan Hawkins are traveling to Washington, D.C. today to participate in the first Capitol Hill Maker Faire, which is being held at the Rayburn House Office Building. The Faire is open to the public, members of Congress, and congressional staff. Rogers and Hawkins are scheduled to meet with Congressman David Price of North Carolina later today.

The Capitol Hill Maker Faire kicks off a nationwide celebration of making, and is being held in conjunction with the much larger National Maker Faire at the University of DC, on June 12–13. It will be followed by the White House National Week of Making, June 12–18. As part of the National Week of Making, NCSU Libraries will be opening their own Makerspace in D.H. Hill Library on Tuesday, June 16.

Hosted by the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) in collaboration with the Congressional Maker Caucus, Maker Media, and Nation of Makers, the faire will explore the new movement driven by hobbyists, tinkerers, crafters, and innovators that is breathing new life and innovation into American manufacturing. The movement is also changing the face of informal learning at community institutions with learning that is inherently experimental, inventive, creative, and project-based.

The Capitol Hill Maker Faire is free and open to the public. It runs from 5:00 pm to 8:00 pm and will feature approximately 30 exhibitors with hands-on displays, such as robots, crafts, 3D printers, and other new manufacturing tools. The faire will be preceded by a series of panel discussions, from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm, with leaders of the Maker movement discussing its impact on the economy, education, and community development.

For details, go to www.imls.gov/maker.

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